Governorate of New Castile

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Governorate of New Castile

Gobernación de Nueva Castilla
1528–1542
Flag of Cross of Burgundy.svg
Mapa de America del Sur (Gobernaciones 1534-1539).svg
Spanish map of the administrative division of New Castile made in 1535
Status Spanish colony
Capital Jauja 1533–1535
Lima after 1535
Common languagesOfficial: Spanish (de facto); common: Quechua, Kichwa, Aymara, Puquina.
Religion
Roman Catholicism (de facto)
GovernmentMonarchy
King  
 1516–1556
Charles I
Governor  
 1528–1541
Francisco Pizarro
 1541–1544
Cristóbal Vaca de Castro
 1544–1548
Gonzalo Pizarro
(Self-proclaimed; unrecognized by Spanish court until death)
Historical era Spanish empire
1528
1532
1533
 Appointment of Francisco Pizarro as Viceroy of Peru
1542
Currency Spanish escudo
Succeeded by
Viceroyalty of Peru Flag of Cross of Burgundy.svg

The Governorate of New Castile (Gobernación de Nueva Castilla, pronounced  [ɡoβeɾnaˈθjon de ˈnweβa kasˈtiʎa] ) was the gubernatorial region administered to Francisco Pizarro in 1528 by King Charles I of Spain, of which he was appointed governor.

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The region roughly consisted of modern Peru and was, after the foundation of Lima in 1535, divided. The conquest of the Inca empire in 1531–1533, performed by Pizarro and his brothers set the basis for the territorial boundaries of New Castile.

Governorates in Peruvian region

After the territorial division of South America between Spain and Portugal, the Peruvian colonial administration was divided into four entities:

This territorial division set the basis for the colonial administration of South America for several decades. It was formally dissolved in 1544, when King Charles I sent his personal envoy, Blasco Núñez Vela, to govern the newly founded Viceroyalty of Peru that replaced the governorates.

See also

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References

    Coordinates: 12°02′36″S77°01′42″W / 12.04333°S 77.02833°W / -12.04333; -77.02833