Governorate of the Río de la Plata

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The Governorate of the Río de la Plata (1549−1776) (Spanish: Gobernación del Río de la Plata, pronounced  [goβeɾnaˈsjon ðel ˈri.o ðe la ˈplata] ) was one of the governorates of the Spanish Empire. It was created in 1549 by Spain in the area around the Río de la Plata.

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It was at first simply a renaming of the New Andalusia Governorate and included all of the land between 470 and 670 leagues south of the mouth of the Río Santiago along the Pacific coast. After 1617, Paraguay was separated under a separate administration (Asunción had been the capital of the governorate since Juan de Ayolas.)

After the founding of the Viceroyalty of Peru in 1542, the governorate was since its birth under its authority until the formation of the independent Viceroyalty of the Rio de la Plata in 1776. Similarly, it was under the jurisdiction of the Royal Audience of Charcas until the formation of the independent Royal Audience of Buenos Aires from 1661 to 1671 and after 1783.

The adelantado grants of Charles V prior to the establishment of the Viceroyalty of Peru. Mapa de America del Sur (Gobernaciones 1534-1539).svg
The adelantado grants of Charles V prior to the establishment of the Viceroyalty of Peru.

Governors of New Andalusia

Governors of the Rio de la Plata

Governors of the Rio de la Plata and Paraguay

Governors of Rio de la Plata

The audiencias of the Viceroyalty of Peru c.1650. The Audience of Charcas is section 5. Audencias of Viceroyalty of Peru.PNG
The audiencias of the Viceroyalty of Peru c.1650. The Audience of Charcas is section 5.

See also

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References

  1. For two, somewhat different interpretations of the boundaries in unsettled areas, see Burkholder, Mark A. and Lyman L. Johnson. Colonial Latin America (10 editions). (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990), Map 2, 73 ISBN   0-19-506110-1; and Lombardi, Cathryn L., John V. Lombardi and K. Lynn Stoner. Latin American History: A Teaching Atlas. (Madison: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1983), 29. ISBN   0-299-09714-5