Gradiška, Bosnia and Herzegovina

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Gradiška
Градишка (Serbian)
Grad Gradiška
Град Градишка
City of Gradiška
Gradiska.jpg
Gradiska2013.jpeg
Savski most u Gradisci.JPG
Zdravofest Gradiska.jpg
Dvoranaservitium.jpg
City of Gradiška
Grb Gradishke.svg
Gradiska municipality.svg
Location of Gradiška within Republika Srpska
Gradiska-naselja.PNG
Coordinates: 45°08′45″N17°15′14″E / 45.14583°N 17.25389°E / 45.14583; 17.25389 Coordinates: 45°08′45″N17°15′14″E / 45.14583°N 17.25389°E / 45.14583; 17.25389
Country Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina
Entity Flag of the Republika Srpska.svg  Republika Srpska
Geographical region Bosanska Krajina
Government
  MayorZoran Adžić (SNSD)
  City761.74 km2 (294.11 sq mi)
Elevation
163 m (535 ft)
Population
 (2013 census)
  City
51,727
Time zone UTC+1 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
78400
Area code(s) +387 51
Website www.gradgradiska.com
Gradiska municipality by population proportional to the settlement with the highest and lowest population Gradiskabypopulation.png
Gradiška municipality by population proportional to the settlement with the highest and lowest population

Gradiška (Serbian Cyrillic : Градишка), [1] [2] [3] formerly Bosanska Gradiška (Serbian Cyrillic : Босанска Градишка), is a city and municipality located in the northwestern region of Republika Srpska, an entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina. As of 2013, it has a population of 51,727 inhabitants, while the city of Gradiška has a population of 14,368 inhabitants.

Contents

It is geographically located in eastern Krajina region, and the town is situated on the Lijevče plain, on the right bank of the Sava river across from Stara Gradiška, Croatia, and about 40 km (25 mi) north of Banja Luka.

History

In the Roman period this town was of strategic importance; a port of the Roman fleet was situated here. Among notable archaeological findings are a viaduct.

Gradiški Brod is mentioned for the first time as a town in c. 1330. It had a major importance as the location where the Sava river used to be crossed. By 1537, the town and its surroundings came under Ottoman rule.

The Ottoman built a fortress, which served as the Bosnia Eyalet's northern defense line. The town was also called Berbir because of the fortress.

Following the outbreak of the First Serbian Uprising (1804), in the Sanjak of Smederevo (modern Central Serbia), the Jančić's Revolt broke out in the Gradiška region against the Ottoman government in the Bosnia Eyalet, following the erosion of the economic, national and religious rights of Serbs. Hajduks also arrived from Serbia, and were especially active on the Kozara. Jovan Jančić Sarajlija organized the uprising with help from Metropolitan Benedikt Kraljević. The peasants took up arms on 23 September 1809, in the region of Gradiška, beginning from Mašići. The fighting began on 25 September, and on the same night, the Ottomans captured and executed Jančić. The rebels retreated to their villages, except those in Kozara and Motajica who continued, and offered strong resistance until their defeat in mid-October, after extensive looting and burning of villages by the Ottomans. [4] Another revolt broke out in 1834, in Mašići. [5]

Ottoman rule ended with the Austro-Hungarian occupation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (1878), following the Herzegovina Uprising (1875–77). Austro-Hungarian rule in Bosnia and Herzegovina ended in 1918, when the South Slavic Austro-Hungarian territories proclaimed the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs, which subsequently joined the Kingdom of Serbia into the Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

From 1929 to 1941 Gradiška was part of the Vrbas Banovina of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

During Yugoslavia, the town was known as Bosanska Gradiška (Босанска Градишка). During the Bosnian War, the town was incorporated into Republika Srpska (RS). After the war, the RS National Assembly changed the name, omitting bosanska ("Bosnian"), as was done with many other towns (Kostajnica, Dubica, Novi Grad, Petrovo, Šamac).

Settlements

Aside from the town of Gradiška, the municipality includes total of 74 other settlements:

Demographics

Population

Population of settlements – Gradiška municipality
Settlement1885.1895.1910.1921.1931.19481953.1961.1971.1981.1991.2013.
Total29,96237,79741,86845,19057,23546,01348,05650,14353,58158,09559,97451,727
1Berek482412
2Bistrica795432
3Bok Jankovac7541,161
4Brestovčina3601,027
5Bukovac349371
6Čatrnja768697
7Cerovljani604367
8Čikule369255
9Cimiroti331202
10Donji Karajzovci600548
11Donji Podgradci957758
12Dubrave2,5811,534
13Elezagići561528
14Gašnica443324
15Gornja Lipovača992500
16Gornji Karajzovci537484
17Gornji Podgradci2,3781,656
18Gradiška5,5909,9326,3639,58513.47516,84114,368
19Grbavci991594
20Jablanica745438
21Kijevci381212
22Kočićevo631463
23Kozinci9081,661
24Krajišnik528617
25Kruškik1,0741,119
26Laminci Brezici1,4151,847
27Laminci Dubrave591438
28Laminci Jaružani394287
29Laminci Sređani574456
30Liskovac1,4671,080
31Lužani275238
32Mačkovac476266
33Mašići1,3591,153
34Miloševo Brdo439241
35Nova Topola2,1912,324
36Orahova2,4791,185
37Petrovo Selo358329
38Rogolji741668
39Romanovci1,199976
40Rovine1,0161,422
41Seferovci502504
42Sovjak307208
43Trebovljani425348
44Trošelji550559
45Turjak415268
46Vakuf416342
47Vilusi887736
48Vrbaška1,057779
49Žeravica335482

Ethnic composition

Ethnic composition – Gradiška city
Nationality2013.1991.1981.1971.
Total14,368 (100,0%)16,841 (100,0%)13,475 (100,0%)9,585 (100,0%)
Serbs11,122 (77,41%)6,502 (38,61%)4,251 (31,55%)2,911 (30,37%)
Bosniaks2,408 (16,76%)7,188 (42,68%)5,033 (37,35%)5,377 (56,10%)
Croats294 (2,046%)781 (4,637%)730 (5,417%)808 (8,430%)
Unaffiliated214 (1,489%)
Others174 (1,211%)582 (3,456%)99 (0,735%)121 (1,262%)
Yugoslavs38 (0,264%)1,788 (10,62%)3 218 (23,88%)306 (3,192%)
Roma34 (0,237%)42 (0,312%)9 (0,094%)
Albanians29 (0,202%)44 (0,327%)25 (0,261%)
Ukrainians17 (0,118%)
Unknown16 (0,111%)
Montenegrins14 (0,097%)29 (0,215%)12 (0,125%)
Slovenes5 (0,035%)20 (0,148%)14 (0,146%)
Macedonians3 (0,021%)9 (0,067%)2 (0,021%)
Ethnic composition – Gradiška Municipality
Nationality2013.1991.1981.1971.
Total51,727 (100,0%)59,974 (100,0%)58,095 (100,0%)53,581 (100,0%)
Serbs41,863 (80,93%)35,753 (59,61%)32,825 (56,50%)35,038 (65,39%)
Bosniaks7,580 (14,65%)15,851 (26,43%)13,026 (22,42%)12,688 (23,68%)
Croats826 (1,597%)3,417 (5,697%)3,544 (6,100%)4,415 (8,240%)
Unaffiliated416 (0,804%)
Roma395 (0,764%)232 (0,399%)29 (0,054%)
Others340 (0,657%)1,642 (2,738%)660 (1,136%)849 (1,585%)
Ukrainians111 (0,215%)
Yugoslavs76 (0,147%)3,311 (5,521%)7,638 (13,15%)415 (0,775%)
Unknown43 (0,083%)
Albanians30 (0,058%)70 (0,120%)56 (0,105%)
Montenegrins29 (0,056%)57 (0,098%)61 (0,114%)
Slovenes14 (0,027%)31 (0,053%)25 (0,047%)
Macedonians4 (0,008%)12 (0,021%)5 (0,009%)

Culture

Serbian Orthodox church in Gradiska. Khram pokrova presvete Bogoroditse (Gradishka).jpg
Serbian Orthodox church in Gradiška.
Monument dedicated to the fallen Serb fighters of the Defense-Fatherland War Spomenik Gradiska.jpg
Monument dedicated to the fallen Serb fighters of the Defense-Fatherland War
Memorial fountain dedicated to Diana Budisavljevic Dijana Budisavljevic memorial fountain.jpg
Memorial fountain dedicated to Diana Budisavljević

The town has a Serbian Orthodox cathedral dedicated to the Mother of God .

Sports

Local football club Kozara have played in the top tier of the Bosnia and Herzegovina football pyramid but spent most seasons in the country's second level First League of the Republika Srpska.

Economy

The following table gives a preview of total number of registered people employed in legal entities per their core activity (as of 2018): [6]

ActivityTotal
Agriculture, forestry and fishing320
Mining and quarrying4
Manufacturing2,916
Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply171
Water supply; sewerage, waste management and remediation activities234
Construction267
Wholesale and retail trade, repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles1,956
Transportation and storage452
Accommodation and food services543
Information and communication71
Financial and insurance activities114
Real estate activities24
Professional, scientific and technical activities323
Administrative and support service activities77
Public administration and defense; compulsory social security581
Education840
Human health and social work activities661
Arts, entertainment and recreation62
Other service activities222
Total9,838

Notable residents

International relations

Twin towns and sister cities

Gradiška is twinned with: [7]

Partnerships

Gradiška also cooperates with: [8]

Notes

  1. As Serbia since Bosnia and Herzegovina does not recognize Kosovo.
  2. The political status of Kosovo is disputed. Having unilaterally declared independence from Serbia in 2008, Kosovo is formally recognised as an independent state by 97 UN member states (with another 15 states recognising it at some point but then withdrawing their recognition), while Serbia continues to claim it as part of its own sovereign territory.

See also

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References

  1. the official web site of the municipality Gradiška/Градишка.
  2. "Systemic census of municipalities and populated places of Bosnia and Herzegovina" (PDF). Sarajevo: Agency for Statistics of Bosnia and Herzegovina. 2013. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 16 July 2015.
  3. "Preliminary results of the 2013 Census of Population, Households and Dwellings in Bosnia and Herzegovina" (PDF). bhas.ba. Sarajevo: Agency for Statistics of Bosnia and Herzegovina. 5 November 2013. p. 8. Retrieved 16 July 2015.
  4. Стојан Бијелић. Машићка буна. Врбаске новине бр. 107 ст. 5, 1933. (извор)
  5. :: Www.Gradiskasela.Net :: Archived 2009-09-25 at the Wayback Machine
  6. "Cities and Municipalities of Republika Srpska" (PDF). rzs.rs.ba. Republika Srspka Institute of Statistics. 25 December 2019. Retrieved 31 December 2019.
  7. "Побратимски градови". gradgradiska.com (in Serbian). Gradiška. 2021-04-24. Retrieved 2021-04-24.
  8. "Пaртнeрски градови / oпштинe". gradgradiska.com (in Serbian). Gradiška. 2021-04-24. Retrieved 2021-04-24.