Graeco-Phrygian

Last updated
Graeco-Phrygian
Greco-Phrygian
Geographic
distribution
Southern Balkans, Anatolia (now Turkey) and Cyprus
Linguistic classification Indo-European
  • Graeco-Phrygian
Subdivisions
Glottolog grae1234

Graeco-Phrygian ( /ˌɡrkˈfrɪiən/ ) is a proposed subgroup of the Indo-European language family which comprises Hellenic and Phrygian languages. [1]

Contents

Evidence

The linguist Claude Brixhe points to the following features Greek and Phrygian are known to have in common and in common with no other language: [2]

Obrador-Cursach (2019) has presented further phonological, morphological and lexical evidence for a close relation between Greek and Phrygian. [3]

Other proposals

Greek has also been variously grouped with Armenian and Indo-Iranian (Graeco-Armenian; Graeco-Aryan), Ancient Macedonian (Graeco-Macedonian) and, more recently, Messapian. Greek and Ancient Macedonian are often classified under Hellenic; at other times, Hellenic is posited to consist of only Greek dialects. The linguist Václav Blažek states that, in regard to the classification of these languages, "the lexical corpora do not allow any quantification" (see corpus and quantitative comparative linguistics). [4]

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References

  1. Ligorio & Lubotsky (2018), p. 1816: "Phrygian is most closely related to Greek. The two languages share a few unique innovations [...] It is therefore very likely that both languages emerged from a single language, which was spoken in the Balkans at the end of the third millennium BCE.
  2. Brixhe (2008 , p. 72)
  3. Obrador-Cursach (2019), p. 243: "With the current state of our knowledge, we can affirm that Phrygian is closely related to Greek."
  4. Blažek (2005 , p. 6)

Bibliography

Further reading