Graham Rees

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Graham Rees
Personal information
Full nameGraham Rees
Born18 April 1936
Maesteg, Glamorgan, Wales
DiedJuly 1987 (aged 51)
Prestwich, England
Playing information
Rugby union
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
Maesteg RFC
Rugby league
Position Prop, Second-row, Loose forward
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≤1968–≤68 Salford
≤1968–68 Swinton
1968–73 St. Helens 181330099
1973–≥73 Salford
Total181330099
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1968–70 Wales 4
Source: [1] [2]

Graham Rees (18 April 1936 – July 1987) was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Maesteg RFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Wales, and at club level for Salford (two spells) Swinton and St. Helens as a prop , second-row, or loose forward, i.e. number 8 or 10, 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums. [1] [2] [3]

Contents

Background

Graham Rees was born in Maesteg, Wales, and he died aged 51 in Prestwich, Greater Manchester, England.

Playing career

International honours

Graham Rees won caps for Wales (RL) while at St. Helens 1968-70 - 4-caps. [1]

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Graham Rees played left-prop, i.e. number 8, and scored a try in St. Helens' 16-13 victory over Leeds in the 1972 Challenge Cup Final during the 1971-72 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 13 May 1972. Graham Rees scored the quickest Challenge Cup Final try in 35 seconds for St Helens in 1972. [4]

County Cup Final appearances

Graham Rees played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, in Swinton's 4-12 defeat by St. Helens in the 1964 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1964–65 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 24 October 1964, played left-second-row, and scored a try in St. Helens' 30-2 victory over Oldham in the 1968 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1968–69 season at Central Park, Wigan on Friday 25 October 1968, and played right-prop, i.e. number 10, in the 4-7 defeat by Leigh in the 1970 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1970–71 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 28 November 1970.

BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final appearances

Graham Rees played left-second-row, i.e. number 11, in Swinton's 2-7 defeat by Castleford in the 1966 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1966–67 season at Wheldon Road, Castleford on Tuesday 20 December 1966, played left-prop, i.e. number 8, in St. Helens' 5-9 defeat by Leeds in the 1970 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1966–67 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Castleford on Tuesday 15 December 1970, and played left-prop in the 8-2 victory over Rochdale Hornets in the 1971 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1971–72 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Tuesday 14 December 1971.

Death

On 1 August 1987, it was reported that Rees had died following a collapse shortly after playing squash at a club in Prestwich. [5]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 "Profile at saints.org.uk". saints.org.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. Williams, Graham; Lush, Peter; Farrar, David (2009). The British Rugby League Records Book. London League. pp. 108–114. ISBN   978-1-903659-49-6.
  4. "Rugby League's home from home". bbc.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  5. "Rugby League". The Guardian. 1 August 1987. p. 14.