Greek torpedo boat Kios

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Fiume-class.PNG
History
Naval Ensign of Greece (1863-1924 and 1935-1970).svg Greece
Ordered: January 16, 1912
Laid down: March 22, 1914
Launched: December 17, 1914
Acquired: 1920 as war reparation from Austria-Hungary
Commissioned: 1920
Decommissioned: April 22, 1941
Fate: scuttled in the Saronic Gulf during German invasion of Greece 1941
General characteristics
Displacement: 270 tons standard
Length: 60.5 m (198 ft)
Beam: 5.6 m (18 ft)
Draft: 1.5 m (4.9 ft)
Propulsion: 5,000 shp; 2 Yarrow boilers; 2 set Melms & Pfenniger turbines
Speed: 31 knots (57 km/h) maximum (32 knots (59 km/h) after 1925)
Complement: 38
Armament: 2 × 66 mm (2.6 in) L/30, AA:2 machine guns, 4 × 450 mm torpedo tubes (2 × 2)

The Greek torpedo boat Kios (Greek: TA Κίος) served in the Royal Hellenic Navy from 19201941. Originally the ship was the Austro-Hungarian Fiume-class torpedo boat SMS Tb 99-M. She was named for the ancient Greek city of Kios (today known as Gemlik) located in Anatolia; the city was part of the territory awarded to Greece for joining the side of the allied in the Treaty of Sèvres at the end of World War I.

Austria-Hungary Constitutional monarchic union from 1867 to October 1918

Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Dual Monarchy, was a constitutional monarchy in Central and Eastern Europe from 1867 to 1918. It was formed by giving a new constitution to the Austrian Empire, which devolved powers on Austria (Cisleithania) and Hungary (Transleithania) and placed them on an equal footing. It broke apart into several states at the end of World War I.

Gemlik Place in Bursa, Turkey

Gemlik is a town and district in the Bursa Province in Turkey on the southern gulf of Armutlu Peninsula on the coast of the Sea of Marmara. It is located approximately 29 km (18 mi) from Bursa, not far from Istanbul. Gemlik was called Kios until 1922, when its Greek inhabitants, who composed around 80% of the population, forced to leave Asia Minor as part of the population exchange with Greece]. As of 2009, the total population of Gemlik is 100,000.

Treaty of Sèvres

The Treaty of Sèvres was one of a series of treaties that the Central Powers signed after their defeat in World War I. Hostilities had already ended with the Armistice of Mudros. The treaty was signed on 10 August 1920, in an exhibition room at the Manufacture nationale de Sèvres porcelain factory in Sèvres, France.

Contents

The ship, along with two sister ships of Monfalcone-built torpedo boats Kydonia and Kyzikos, was transferred to Greece as a war reparation from the Central Powers in 1920. [1]

The Greek torpedo boat Kyzikos served in the Royal Hellenic Navy from 1920–1941. Originally the ship was the Austro-Hungarian Fiume-class torpedo boat SMS Tb 98-M. She was named for the ancient Greek city of Kyzikos located in Anatolia; the city was part of the territory awarded to Greece for joining the side of the allied in the Treaty of Sèvres at the end of World War I.

Central Powers group of countries defeated in World War I

The Central Powers, consisting of Germany, Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire and Bulgaria—hence also known as the Quadruple Alliance —was one of the two main coalitions that fought World War I (1914–18).

Service in the Austro-Hungarian navy

In the build-up to the First World War, Austria-Hungary ordered four 250–tonne boats to be built at the Ganz & Co.– Danubius shipyard in 1912/13. The Navy asked for several improvements compared with the Trieste–class boats. Negotiations broke down in early December because of exaggerated prices requested by Danubius and were only resumed when pressured by the Hungarian Minister of Commerce. Danubius lowered its price by 10%. Finally Ganz & Co. – Danubius got orders for 16 torpedoboats in 1913, despite the fact that original plans had called for the Naval Arsenal Pola to build the Tb 86 to Tb 100 series. These ‘Monfalcone–boats’ were commissioned under the numbers Tb 98 M to Tb 100 M between March 1915 and March 1916. They differed from their Trieste sister–ships having two funnels and an extended forecastle. [2] They were very similar to the Fiume-built ships of the same series.

World War I 1914–1918 global war originating in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

Service in the Hellenic navy

Kios served in the Hellenic navy from 1920 until she was scuttled at sea near Athens during the German invasion of Greece on April 22, 1941.

Athens Capital and largest city of Greece

Athens is the capital and largest city of Greece. Athens dominates the Attica region and is one of the world's oldest cities, with its recorded history spanning over 3,400 years and its earliest human presence starting somewhere between the 11th and 7th millennium BC.

See also

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