Greenhorn Mountain

Last updated
Greenhorn Mountain
Greenhorn.JPG
Greenhorn Mountain seen from Walsenburg, Colorado
Highest point
Elevation 12,352 ft (3,765 m) [1] [2]
Prominence 3,777 ft (1,151 m) [3]
Isolation 25.24 mi (40.62 km) [3]
Listing Colorado county high points 35th
Coordinates 37°52′53″N105°00′48″W / 37.8814618°N 105.0133256°W / 37.8814618; -105.0133256 Coordinates: 37°52′53″N105°00′48″W / 37.8814618°N 105.0133256°W / 37.8814618; -105.0133256 [1]
Geography
USA Colorado location map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Greenhorn Mountain
Location Huerfano County and the high point of Pueblo County, Colorado, U.S. [3]
Parent range Highest summit of the
Wet Mountains [3]
Topo map USGS 7.5' topographic map
San Isabel, Colorado [4]
Climbing
Easiest route Hike

Greenhorn Mountain is the highest summit of the Wet Mountains range in the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 12,352-foot (3,765 m) peak is located in the Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness of San Isabel National Forest, 5.2 miles (8.4 km) southwest by west (bearing 238°) of the Town of Rye, Colorado, United States, on the boundary between Huerfano and Pueblo counties. The summit of Greenhorn Mountain is the highest point in Pueblo County, Colorado. [1] [2] [3] The peak's summit rises above timberline, which is about 11,500 feet (3,500 m) in south-central Colorado.

Contents

Geography

The massive Greenhorn Mountain can be seen from Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Trinidad, and also from along Interstate 25 rising over 7,000 feet (2,100 m) above the great plains to the east. The mountain's habitats are protected within the secluded Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness Area, which is only accessed by a few trails and a 4-wheel drive road on its north.

Name origin

The original name for the mountain peak was Cuerno Verde. [5] The name comes from Cuerno Verde (Green Horn) given by the colonial Spanish of the Provincias Internas to two, father and son, Jupe Comanche band mahimiana paraibo or war chiefs. The younger Cuerno Verde was known to the Comanches as "Man Who Holds Danger." On September 3, 1779, younger Cuerno Verde, his son, medicine man, four principal chiefs, and ten of his warriors, were killed near Greenhorn Mountain by the men of the expedition of Spanish troops and native American allies (Apache, Ute,and Pueblo) under Juan Bautista de Anza. [6]

US Board on Geographic Names decides in favor using Greenhorn over Cuerno Verde for highest peak of the Wet Mountains located in the US state of Colorado. Greenhorn Mountain Decision Card 06446.pdf
US Board on Geographic Names decides in favor using Greenhorn over Cuerno Verde for highest peak of the Wet Mountains located in the US state of Colorado.

On April 4, 1906, the United States Board on Geographic Names decided to use the English translation, Greenhorn, for the name it carries today.

See also

Related Research Articles

Mount Massive

Mount Massive is the second-highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the U.S. state of Colorado. The prominent 14,428-foot (4,398 m) fourteener of the Sawatch Range is located in the Mount Massive Wilderness of San Isabel National Forest, 10.6 miles (17.1 km) west-southwest of the City of Leadville in Lake County, Colorado, United States. Mount Massive edges out the third-highest summit of the Rockies, Mount Harvard, by 7 feet (2.1 m), but falls short of Mount Elbert by 12 feet (3.7 m). It ranks as the third-highest peak in the contiguous United States after Mount Whitney and Mount Elbert.

Sangre de Cristo Mountains

The Sangre de Cristo Mountains are the southernmost subrange of the Rocky Mountains. They are located in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico in the United States. The mountains run from Poncha Pass in South-Central Colorado, trending southeast and south, ending at Glorieta Pass, southeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico. The mountains contain a number of fourteen thousand foot peaks in the Colorado portion, as well as all the peaks in New Mexico which are over thirteen thousand feet.

Castle Peak (Colorado)

Castle Peak is the ninth highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the U.S. state of Colorado. The prominent 14,279-foot (4352.2 m) fourteener is the highest summit of the Elk Mountains and the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness. The peak is located 11.6 miles (18.7 km) northeast by north of the Town of Crested Butte, Colorado, United States, on the drainage divide separating Gunnison National Forest and Gunnison County from White River National Forest and Pitkin County. The summit of Castle Peak is the highest point of both counties.

La Plata Peak

La Plata Peak is the fifth-highest summit of the Rocky Mountains of North America and the U.S. state of Colorado. The prominent 14,343-foot (4,372 m) fourteener is located in the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness of San Isabel National Forest, 22.7 miles (36.5 km) northwest by west of the Town of Buena Vista in Chaffee County, Colorado, United States.

Mount Sneffels

Mount Sneffels is the highest summit of the Sneffels Range in the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 14,158-foot (4315.4 m) fourteener is located in the Mount Sneffels Wilderness of Uncompahgre National Forest, 6.7 miles (10.8 km) west by south of the City of Ouray in Ouray County, Colorado, United States. The summit of Mount Sneffels is the highest point in Ouray County.

Mount Wilson (Colorado)

Mount Wilson is the highest summit of the San Miguel Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 14,252-foot (4,344 m) fourteener is located in the Lizard Head Wilderness of San Juan National Forest, 10.6 miles (17.1 km) north by east of the Town of Rico in Dolores County, Colorado, United States. Mount Wilson should not to be confused with the lower Wilson Peak nearby.

Mount Eolus Mountain in Colorado, United States

Mount Eolus is a high mountain summit of the Needle Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 14,090-foot (4,295 m) fourteener is located in the Weminuche Wilderness of San Juan National Forest, 27.4 miles (44.1 km) northeast by north of the City of Durango in La Plata County, Colorado, United States.

Windom Peak

Windom Peak is the highest summit of the Needle Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 14,093-foot (4,296 m) fourteener is located in the Weminuche Wilderness of San Juan National Forest, 28.2 miles (45.4 km) northeast by north of the City of Durango in La Plata County, Colorado, United States. The summit of Windom Peak is the highest point in La Plata County and the entire San Juan River drainage basin. The mountain was named in honor of Minnesota senator William Windom.

San Isabel National Forest Forest in Colorado, US

San Isabel National Forest is located in central Colorado. The forest contains 19 of the state's 53 fourteeners, peaks over 14,000 feet (4,267 m) high, including Mount Elbert, the highest point in Colorado.

Wet Mountains Mountain range in southern Colorado, United States

The Wet Mountains are a small mountain range in southern Colorado, named for the amount of snow they receive in the winter. They are a sub-range of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, in the southern Rocky Mountains System. There are three variant names of mountain range: Cuerno Verde, Greenhorn Mountains, and Sierra Mojada.

East Spanish Peak

East Spanish Peak is a prominent mountain summit that is the lower of the two Spanish Peaks in the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 12,688-foot (3,867 m) peak is located in the Spanish Peaks Wilderness of San Isabel National Forest, 9.3 miles (14.9 km) southeast by south of the Town of La Veta, Colorado, United States, on the drainage divide between Huerfano and Las Animas counties. The Spanish Peaks are two large igneous stocks which form an eastern outlier of the Culebra Range, a subrange of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. East Spanish Peak is higher than any point in the United States east of its longitude; it is also the easternmost point in the United States over 12,000 feet (3,700 m), 11,000 feet (3,400 m), and 10,000 feet (3,000 m) feet above sea level.

Cuerno Verde Leader of the Comanche in the late 18th century

Cuerno Verde was a leader of the Comanche, likely of the Kotsoteka Comanche, in the late 18th century.

Tijeras Peak

Tijeras Peak is a high mountain summit in the Sangre de Cristo Range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 13,610-foot (4,148 m) thirteener is located 9.8 miles (15.8 km) southeast by east of the Town of Crestone in Saguache County, Colorado, United States, in the Sangre de Cristo Wilderness on the boundary between Great Sand Dunes National Preserve and Rio Grande National Forest. Tijeras Peak is the highest summit in Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve. Tijeras is Spanish for scissors, and refers to the double-pronged rocky tip of the mountain.

James Peak

James Peak is a high mountain summit in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 13,300-foot (4,054 m) thirteener is located on the Continental Divide in the James Peak Wilderness of Arapaho National Forest and Roosevelt National Forest, 5.2 miles (8.4 km) east-southeast of the Town of Winter Park, Colorado, United States. The summit is the tripoint of Clear Creek, Gilpin, and Grand counties. The peak is the highest point in Gilpin County and the James Peak Wilderness.

Mount Julian (Colorado)

Mount Julian is a mountain summit in the northern Front Range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 12,933-foot (3,942 m) peak is located in the Rocky Mountain National Park Wilderness, 12.2 miles (19.7 km) west of the Town of Estes Park in Larimer County, Colorado, United States. The mountain was named in honor of Julian Hayden, a civil engineer who lived in Estes Park.

Mount Richthofen

Mount Richthofen is the highest summit of the Never Summer Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 12,945-foot (3,946 m) peak is located 5.6 miles (9.0 km) northwest by west of Milner Pass, Colorado, United States, on the Continental Divide separating the Rocky Mountain National Park Wilderness in Rocky Mountain National Park and Grand County from Routt National Forest and Jackson County. The mountain was named in honor of pioneering German geologist Baron Ferdinand von Richthofen, apparently by Clarence King's 1870 survey team.

Mount Alice (Colorado)

Mount Alice is a high mountain summit in the northern Front Range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 13,315-foot (4,058 m) thirteener is located in the Rocky Mountain National Park Wilderness, 12.0 miles (19.3 km) southwest by south of the Town of Estes Park, Colorado, United States, immediately east of the Continental Divide between Boulder and Grand counties. Just who the namesake Alice was is unclear, but according to one source she was likely a "woman of ill repute".

Bison Peak

Bison Peak is the highest summit of the Tarryall Mountains range in the Rocky Mountains of North America. Officially designated Bison Mountain, the prominent 12,432-foot (3,789 m) peak is located in the Lost Creek Wilderness of Pike National Forest, 8.1 miles (13.1 km) north by west of the community of Tarryall in Park County, Colorado, United States. The summit is the highest point in the Lost Creek Wilderness.

Mount Powell (Colorado)

Mount Powell is the highest summit of the Gore Range in the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 13,586-foot (4,141 m) thirteener is located in the Eagles Nest Wilderness, 8.5 miles (13.7 km) north by east of the Town of Vail, Colorado, United States, along the drainage divide separating White River National Forest and Eagle County from Arapaho National Forest and Summit County. Mount Powell was named in honor of John Wesley Powell who climbed to the summit in 1868.

Chief Cheley Peak

Chief Cheley Peak is a mountain summit in the northern Front Range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 12,815-foot (3,906 m) peak is located in the Rocky Mountain National Park Wilderness, 13.1 miles (21.1 km) west of the Town of Estes Park, Colorado, United States, on the Continental Divide between Grand and Larimer counties.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "GREENHORN MTN". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey . Retrieved October 20, 2014.
  2. 1 2 The elevation of Greenhorn Mountain includes an adjustment of +1.401 m (+4.60 ft) from NGVD 29 to NAVD 88.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 "Greenhorn Mountain, Colorado". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved October 20, 2014.
  4. "Greenhorn Mountain". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved November 15, 2014.
  5. "The Rocky Mountain News (Daily) January 31, 1868 — Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection". www.coloradohistoricnewspapers.org. Retrieved 2020-12-26.
  6. Elizabeth A.H. John, Storms Brewed in Other Men's Worlds, Texas A&M University Press, College Station 1975, pages 584-589 ISBN   9780806128696 (2nd ed. University of Oklahoma Press, 1996).

Sources