Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness

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Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness
IUCN category Ib (wilderness area)
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Location Huerfano / Pueblo counties, Colorado, USA
Nearest city Rye, Colorado
Coordinates 37°51′00″N105°01′00″W / 37.85000°N 105.01667°W / 37.85000; -105.01667 [1] Coordinates: 37°51′00″N105°01′00″W / 37.85000°N 105.01667°W / 37.85000; -105.01667 [2]
Area 22,040 acres (89.2 km2)
Established 1993
Governing body U.S. Forest Service

The Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness is a U.S. Wilderness Area located northwest of Walsenburg, Colorado in the San Isabel and Pike National Forests. The wilderness area includes the summit of Greenhorn Mountain, the highest point in the Wet Mountains of Colorado. There are 11 miles (18 km) of trails, all in the northern half of the wilderness. [3] [4] [5]

Walsenburg, Colorado City in State of Colorado, United States

Walsenburg is a statutory city that is the county seat and the most populous city of Huerfano County, Colorado, United States. The city population was 3,068 at the 2010 census, down from 4,182 in 2000.

San Isabel National Forest Forest in Colorado, US

San Isabel National Forest is located in central Colorado. The forest contains 19 of the state's 53 fourteeners, peaks over 14,000 feet (4,267 m) high, including Mount Elbert, the highest point in Colorado.

Pike National Forest

The Pike National Forest is located in the Front Range of Colorado, United States, west of Colorado Springs including Pikes Peak. The forest encompasses 1,106,604 acres (4,478 km²) within Clear Creek, Teller, Park, Jefferson, Douglas and El Paso counties. The major rivers draining the forest are the South Platte and Fountain Creek. Rampart Reservoir, a large artificial body of water, is located within the forest.

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Greenhorn Mountain mountain in United States of America

Greenhorn Mountain is the highest summit of the Wet Mountains range in the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 12,352-foot (3,765 m) peak is located in the Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness of San Isabel National Forest, 5.2 miles (8.4 km) southwest by west of the Town of Rye, Colorado, United States, on the boundary between Huerfano and Pueblo counties. The summit of Greenhorn Mountain is the highest point in Pueblo County, Colorado. The peak's summit rises above timberline, which is about 11,500 feet (3,500 m) in south-central Colorado.

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References

  1. "Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved August 10, 2012.
  2. "Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved August 10, 2012.
  3. "Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness". Wilderness.net. Retrieved August 10, 2012.
  4. "Greenhorn Mountain Wilderness". Colorado Wilderness. Retrieved August 10, 2012.
  5. Rappold, R. Scott (September 9, 2009). "Out there: Wet Mountain wilderness offers solitude". Colorado Springs, Colorado: The Gazette. Retrieved August 10, 2012.