Greens New South Wales

Last updated
The Greens NSW
Founded1991 (1991)
HeadquartersSuite D, Level 1/275 Broadway
Glebe NSW 2037 [1]
Membership (2018)Decrease2.svg ~3,000 [2]
Ideology Green politics [3]
International affiliation
Legislative Assembly
3 / 93
Legislative Council
3 / 42
NSW Local Councillors
58 / 1,480
Website
nsw.greens.org.au

The Greens New South Wales is the state Greens party in New South Wales and a member party of the Australian Greens.

New South Wales State of Australia

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea to the east. The Australian Capital Territory is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In September 2018, the population of New South Wales was over 8 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.1 million, live in the Greater Sydney area. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welshmen.

Australian Greens Australian political party

The Australian Greens, commonly known as The Greens, are a green political party in Australia.

Contents

Electoral history

The first Greens party was registered in 1984, but the Greens NSW did not take its current form until 1991, when six local groups in New South Wales federated as a state political party. Greens candidates have run in every federal election since 1984, when a single candidate ran in the federal Division of Sydney.

Division of Sydney Australian federal electoral division

The Division of Sydney is an Australian electoral division in the state of New South Wales. The division draws its name from Sydney, the most populous city in Australia, which itself was named after former British Home Secretary Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney. The division was proclaimed at the redistribution of 21 November 1968, replacing the old Division of Dalley, Division of East Sydney and Division of West Sydney, and was first contested at the 1969 election.

New South Wales state elections

NSW Election Results
Primary Vote (LA)

1995 New South Wales state election

Elections to the 51st Parliament of New South Wales were held on Saturday 25 March 1995. All seats in the Legislative Assembly and half the seats in the Legislative Council were up for election. The minority Liberal Party-led Coalition government of Premier John Fahey was defeated by the Labor Party, led by Opposition Leader Bob Carr. Carr went on to become the longest continuously-serving premier in the state's history, stepping down in 2005. Fahey pursued a brief career as a Federal Government minister.

1999 New South Wales state election

Elections to the 52nd Parliament of New South Wales were held on Saturday, 27 March 1999. All seats in the Legislative Assembly and half the seats in the Legislative Council were up for election. The Labor Party, led by premier Bob Carr won a second term with a 7% swing against the Liberal Party and National Party, led by Kerry Chikarovski.

2003 New South Wales state election

Elections to the 53rd Parliament of New South Wales were held on Saturday 22 March 2003. All seats in the Legislative Assembly and half the seats in the Legislative Council were up for election. The Labor Party led by Bob Carr won a third four-year term against the Liberal-National Coalition led by John Brogden.

The party first came close to electing a candidate in 1991, when Ian Cohen was the last candidate to be excluded in a contest against Christian Democratic Party leader Fred Nile. In the subsequent 1995 election, Cohen was elected to the NSW Legislative Council and became the first Greens parliamentary representative in NSW. In 1999 he was joined by Lee Rhiannon and in 2003 he was re-elected and joined by Sylvia Hale.

Ian Cohen Australian politician

Ian Cohen is a former Australian politician and member of the Greens New South Wales. Cohen was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Council in 1995 as its first Green member. He retired from parliament in 2011.

Christian Democratic Party (Australia) Political party

The Christian Democratic Party (CDP) is a socially conservative political party in Australia, founded in 1977 under the name Call to Australia Party by a group of Christian ministers in New South Wales, who had Fred Nile, a Congregational Church minister, run as their upper house candidate in the NSW State election. Fred Nile commonly refers to himself as the party's founder; however, the party states that it was founded by "concerned Australian ministers".

Frederick John "Fred" Nile ED MLC is an Australian politician and ordained Christian minister. Nile has been a member of the New South Wales Legislative Council since 1981, except for a period in 2004 when he resigned to unsuccessfully contest the Australian Senate at the 2004 federal election. Nile was re-elected at the March 2007 state election and served the Assistant President of the Legislative Council until 25 February 2019. He is the longest-serving member of the New South Wales parliament. In November 2009 he stated his decision to retire in 2015, but later announced his decision to accept the Christian Democratic Party (CDP) nomination for the NSW Legislative Council at the New South Wales State Election on 28 March 2015.

Greens members celebrating during the 2015 NSW election. Greensmmeberscelebrating2015electionresult.jpg
Greens members celebrating during the 2015 NSW election.

In 2007 Lee Rhiannon was re-elected to the Legislative Council and joined by John Kaye, bringing the number of Members of the Legislative Council to four. In 2010 Lee Rhiannon resigned from the Legislative Council to contest and win a Senate seat, and Sylvia Hale also resigned her seat. The resulting casual vacancies were filled by Cate Faehrmann and David Shoebridge respectively.

2007 New South Wales state election

Elections for the 54th Parliament of New South Wales were held on Saturday, 24 March 2007. The entire Legislative Assembly and half of the Legislative Council was up for election. The Labor Party led by Morris Iemma won a fourth four-year term against the Liberal-National coalition led by Peter Debnam.

John Kaye (politician) Australian politician

John Kaye was an Australian politician. He was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Council at the 2007 state election and represented the Greens. He was a vocal critic of electricity industry privatisation and a strong advocate for renewable energy and energy efficiency. He believed in life-long, high quality, and free public education and was a determined spokesperson for public schools as well as Colleges of Technical and Further Education (TAFE).

In politics, a casual vacancy is a situation in which a seat in a deliberative assembly becomes vacant during that assembly's term. Casual vacancies may arise through the death, resignation or disqualification of the sitting member, or for other reasons.

At the 2011 NSW state election the Greens further increased their vote, resulting in the election of Jamie Parker as the first Greens member of the Legislative Assembly, representing Balmain. David Shoebridge was re-elected and joined by Jan Barham and Jeremy Buckingham in the Legislative Council.

2011 New South Wales state election

Elections to the 55th Parliament of New South Wales were held on Saturday, 26 March 2011. The 16-year-incumbent Labor Party government led by Premier Kristina Keneally was defeated in a landslide by the Liberal–National Coalition opposition led by Barry O'Farrell. Labor suffered a two-party swing of 16.4 points, the largest against a sitting government at any level in Australia since World War II. From 48 seats at dissolution, Labor was knocked down to 20 seats—the worst defeat of a sitting government in New South Wales history, and one of the worst of a state government in Australia since federation. The Coalition picked up a 34-seat swing to win a strong majority, with 69 seats–the largest majority government, in terms of percentage of seats controlled, in NSW history. It is only the third time since 1941 that a NSW Labor government has been defeated.

Jamie Parker (politician) Australian politician

Jamie Thomas Parker is the member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly representing Balmain for the Greens since 2011. Parker is the first Green to represent his party in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly.

Electoral district of Balmain state electoral district of New South Wales, Australia

Balmain is an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly of the Australian state of New South Wales in Sydney's Inner West. It is currently represented by Jamie Parker of the Greens New South Wales.

In 2013 Cate Faehrmann resigned from the Legislative Council to contest a Senate seat. The resulting casual vacancy was filled by Mehreen Faruqi of the South Sydney Greens.

At the 2015 State election current sitting members Jamie Parker, John Kaye and Mehreen Faruqi were re-elected. Two new members were elected to the Legislative Assembly: Jenny Leong in the new seat of Newtown and Tamara Smith in the previously safe National seat of Ballina. The Greens primary vote in Newtown of 45.6% is the party's highest ever primary vote in a lower house electorate. This resulted in five Legislative Council seats and three Legislative Assembly seats.

In October 2016, Jan Barham resigned and the casual vacancy was filled a few months later by former federal candidate for Richmond, Dawn Walker.

In December 2018, Jeremy Buckingham resigned from the Greens NSW. [4]

Buckingham Described the party as “toxic”, Buckingham said the Greens had “abandoned the core principles they were founded on” and were more focused on “bringing down capitalism” and “divisive identity politics” than acting on climate change. [5]

At the 2019 state election there were two upper house Greens seats up for contest as was Buckingham's. David Shoebridge was re-elected, Abigail Boyd (former federal candidate for Dobell) won one but Dawn Walker lost hers. Each of the three lower house seats were returned with a favourable swing.

Federal elections

Federal Election Results
NSW Primary Vote (HoR)

The Greens elected their first ever New South Wales Senator, Kerry Nettle, at the 2001 election, only the second Australian Greens senator elected ever, joining Senator Bob Brown of Tasmania, who was elected to a second term at that election.

In 2002, Michael Organ was elected to the House of Representatives for the Wollongong seat of Cunningham at a by-election. Organ was the first Greens member to be elected to a single-member electorate in Australia.

At the 2004 Federal Election, the Greens ran John Kaye as their lead Senate candidate but was unsuccessful due to unfavourable preference flows and in 2007 Nettle lost her seat despite increasing her vote from 2001. In 2010 the Greens elected Lee Rhiannon to the Senate. No Greens candidates were successful in the 2013 election.

Constitutional Convention

Greens NSW members representing their local groups at an SDC meeting in 2015 Greensnswmembersatsdcgloucester2015.jpg
Greens NSW members representing their local groups at an SDC meeting in 2015

In 1997 The Greens NSW formed part of a joint ticket called Greens, Bill of Rights, Indigenous Peoples for the 1998 Constitutional Convention held in Canberra in February 1998. Catherine Moore led the ticket and was elected for NSW. She joined Christine Milne from Tasmania to focus on ensuring that the overall process was more inclusive. [6]

Local government

The party endorses candidates to stand for election in many of the 128 local government areas across NSW, including in rural and regional areas where the major parties usually do not run candidates on party tickets. The Greens NSW currently have 58 councillors on 32 local councils around NSW. [7]

In NSW local government elections were held in September 2016 and September 2017.

In 2016 The Greens elected three mayors and 24 councillors in the 29 areas where candidates stood. Greens councillors were elected for the first time in: Albury, Broken Hill, Clarence Valley, Glen Innes Severn, Goulburn Mulwaree, Kyogle and Yass Valley. The Greens also grew their vote in Bellingen, Byron, Shoalhaven, Campbelltown, Kiama, Hawkesbury, Wingecarribee, Lismore, Hawkesbury and the Blue Mountains.

In 2017 The Greens elected a further 31 Councillors in Armidale, Bathurst, Canterbury Bankstown, Canada Bay, Hornsby, Inner West, Newcastle, Northern Beaches, Orange, Parramatta, Queanbeyan Palerang, Randwick, Ryde. Snowy Mountains. Waverley, Willoughby, Woollahra, Woollongong.

The Greens have five sitting mayors in Byron, Shoalhaven, Randwick, Bellingen and Tweed.

Structure

The Greens NSW was founded when local Greens groups federated into a statewide party. Sydney-Greens-Glebe-061085.jpg
The Greens NSW was founded when local Greens groups federated into a statewide party.

The Greens NSW retain the same basic structure which was created in 1991, with the formation of the statewide party.

State Delegates Council

The Greens NSW make decisions affecting the state party through the State Delegates Council (SDC), a meeting that consists of a delegate from each local group. The SDC is the highest decision-making body, and controls election campaigns for statewide candidatures (such as the Senate and Legislative Council). It also decides on admitting new local groups as members of the Greens NSW.

Local groups

The party is made up of 'local groups', who cover a specific geographical area. Local groups have complete responsibility for elections held in their area, particularly elections for the House of Representatives, the New South Wales Legislative Assembly or Local Government. There are currently 56 affiliated local groups in NSW. [8]

Working groups

A variety of working groups have been established by the SDC, which are directly accessible to all Greens members. Working groups perform an advisory function by developing policy, conducting issues-based campaigns, or performing other tasks assigned by the SDC. These include:

Political factions

There is only one publicly acknowledged faction within Greens New South Wales which is the Left Renewal faction. It was formed in late 2016 and presents itself as the far-left, anti-capitalist wing of state's party. [9] [10]

Electoral Results

NSW Legislative Assembly

Election yearLeaderVotes% of votesSeats won+/–Notes
1995 None87,8622.57 (#6)
0 / 99
1999 145,019Increase2.svg 3.88 (#6)
0 / 93
Steady2.svg 0
2003 315,370Increase2.svg 8.25 (#4)
0 / 93
Steady2.svg 0
2007 352,805Increase2.svg 8.95 (#4)
0 / 93
Steady2.svg 0
2011 427,144Increase2.svg 10.28 (#4)
1 / 93
Increase2.svg 1
2015 453,031Increase2.svg 10.29 (#4)
3 / 93
Increase2.svg 2
2019 435,401Decrease2.svg 9.57 (#4)
3 / 93
Steady2.svg 0

NSW Legislative Council

Election yearLeaderVotes% of votesSeats wonOverall seats+/–Notes
1995 None126,5913.75 (#3)
1 / 21
1 / 42
1999 103,463Decrease2.svg 2.91 (#6)
1 / 21
2 / 42
Increase2.svg 1
2003 320,010Increase2.svg 8.60 (#3)
2 / 21
3 / 42
Increase2.svg 1
2007 347,548Increase2.svg 9.12 (#3)
2 / 21
4 / 42
Increase2.svg 1
2011 453,125Increase2.svg 11.12 (#3)
3 / 21
5 / 42
Increase2.svg 1
2015 412,660Decrease2.svg 9.92 (#3)
2 / 21
5 / 42
Steady2.svg 0
2019 432,999Decrease2.svg 9.73 (#3)
2 / 21
4 / 42
Decrease2.svg 1

Members of Parliament

Current

Australian Parliament

New South Wales Legislative Council

New South Wales Legislative Assembly

Former

Australian Parliament

New South Wales Legislative Council

See also

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References

  1. Karp, Paul. "Factional infighting erupts in NSW Greens over Lee Rhiannon claims". The Guardian Australia. The Guardian Australia. Retrieved 28 May 2018.
  2. https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/news/politics/2019/02/02/greens-split-factional-war/15490260007390
  3. Boyle, LINKS. "Australia: Left-Green unity is an objective necessity". Socialist Alliance. Retrieved 22 March 2014.
  4. https://www.buzzfeed.com/joshtaylor/jeremy-buckingham-is-quitting-the-corrupt-nsw-greens
  5. https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/dec/20/nsw-mp-jeremy-buckingham-quits-greens-and-will-run-as-an-independent-at-election
  6. Archived September 21, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  7. "Greens on Council".
  8. "Local Groups". greens.org.au. 6 September 2014. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  9. "Lee Rhiannon downplays reports Left Renewal faction is splintering Greens". www.theguardian.com. The Guardian Australia. Retrieved 5 March 2019.
  10. Aston, Heath (22 December 2016). "Hard-left faction forms inside Greens aiming to 'end capitalism'" via The Sydney Morning Herald.
  11. "NSW Greens MP Justin Field quits party to sit on crossbench". The Guardian . April 4, 2019. Retrieved April 14, 2019.

Notes

  1. He left the party over against internal division and “hyper-partisanship” that plague the Party's chapter. [11]