Gressoney-La-Trinité

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Gressoney-La-Trinité

Greschòney Drifaltigkeit  (Walser)
Comune di Gressoney-La-Trinité
Commune de Gressoney-La-Trinité
Gemeinde Gressoney-La-Trinité
GressoneyLT veduta.jpg
Centre of the town
Blason ville It Gressoney-La-Trinite (AO).svg
Coat of arms
Location of Gressoney-La-Trinité
Gressoney-La-Trinite
Italy provincial location map 2016.svg
Red pog.svg
Gressoney-La-Trinité
Location of Gressoney-La-Trinité in Italy
Italy Aosta Valley location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Gressoney-La-Trinité
Gressoney-La-Trinité (Aosta Valley)
Coordinates: 45°50′N07°50′E / 45.833°N 7.833°E / 45.833; 7.833 Coordinates: 45°50′N07°50′E / 45.833°N 7.833°E / 45.833; 7.833
Country Italy
Region Aosta Valley
Area
[1]
  Total65 km2 (25 sq mi)
Elevation
1,635 m (5,364 ft)
Population
 (31 December 2006) [2]
  Total304
  Density4.7/km2 (12/sq mi)
Demonym(s) Gressonards
Time zone UTC+1 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
11020
Dialing code 0125
Website Official website

Gressoney-La-Trinité (Gressoney Walser : Greschòney Drifaltigkeit or Creschnau Drifaltigkeit; Arpitan : Gressonèy-La-Trinità) is a town or commune and renowned alpine resort at the foot of Monte Rosa in the Val de Gressoney, which is part of the Aosta Valley region of Northwest Italy. It features one of the most scenic alpine ski resorts in the Aosta Valley.

Contents

Geography

Gressoney-La-Trinité is located in a side valley of the Aosta Valley region of northwestern Italy. At 1,627 metres (5,338 ft) above sea level, it has the highest elevation of any city in the Gressoney Valley.

History

Inscription in Walser German dedicated to Henrich Welf, a native of Gressoney-La-Trinite, president of the Walser Kulturzentrum. Greschoneititsch.jpg
Inscription in Walser German dedicated to Henrich Welf, a native of Gressoney-La-Trinité, president of the Walser Kulturzentrum.
Garage door of the local fire service in La-Trinite. The door is specified in the three official languages: German, Italian and French. GresTrinFeuerwehr.jpg
Garage door of the local fire service in La-Trinité. The door is specified in the three official languages: German, Italian and French.

Germanic people, known as the Walser, settled in the upper Lys Valley from the 12th century onwards. [3] Historically, Gressoney-Saint-Jean and Gressoney-La-Trinité have been two separate communes . [4]

From 1928 until 1946, the two communes were unified and officially named Gressoney. From 1939 to 1946, the name was Italianized into Gressonei. After WWII the two former communes were again reconstituted separately. [5]

Walser Culture and Language

Gressoney-La-Trinité and Gressoney-Saint-Jean form a Walser German linguistic and cultural entity known as Greschòney in Franco-Provençal or Arpitan, Kressenau in Walser German, or Kreschnau in the local Walser dialect known as Greschoneytitsch (or simply Titsch). [6]

An example of Greschòneytitsch:

Walser GermanGermanEnglish

Endsche Attò
das béscht em Hémmel,
dass héilege sígge Dín Noame.
Chéeme Dín Herrschaft. [7]

Vater unser
der Du bist im Himmel,
geheiligt werde Dein Name.
Dein Reich komme.

Our Father
in heaven,
hallowed be your name.
Your kingdom come,

Where to stay

There are many hotels and bed-and-breakfast lodgings near the Monterosa ski lifts. Camping chalets and pitches are also available for rent.

Related Research Articles

Aosta Valley An autonomous region of Italy

The Aosta Valley is a mountainous autonomous region in northwestern Italy. It is bordered by Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes, France, to the west, Valais, Switzerland, to the north, and by Piedmont, Italy, to the south and east. The regional capital is Aosta.

Walser

The Walser are the speakers of the Walser German dialects, a variety of Highest Alemannic. They inhabit the region of the Alps of Switzerland and Liechtenstein, as well as the fringes of Italy and Austria. The Walser people are named after the Wallis (Valais), the uppermost Rhône valley, where they settled from roughly the 10th century in the late phase of the migration of the Alamanni, crossing from the Bernese Oberland; because of linguistic differences among the Walser dialects, it is supposed that there were two independent immigration routes.

Monte Rosa Massif in Switzerland and Italy

Monte Rosa is a mountain massif in the eastern part of the Pennine Alps. It is between Italy's and Switzerland's (Valais). Monte Rosa is the second highest mountain in the Alps and western Europe, after Mont Blanc.

Courmayeur Comune in Aosta Valley, Italy

Courmayeur is a town and comune in northern Italy, in the autonomous region of Aosta Valley.

Alagna Valsesia Comune in Piedmont, Italy

Alagna Valsesia is a comune and small village high in the Valsesia alpine valley in the province of Vercelli, Piedmont, northern Italy, a UNESCO World heritage site since 2013. It is a tourist place for mountaineering and winter sports, and it is internationally renowned for the freeride off-piste skiing. It is also the traditional starting point for the Margherita Hut climb, at 4,554 metres (14,941 ft) above sea level, the highest building in Europe. It was originally settled by Walser at the beginning of the 12th century. It is located at an elevation of 1,191 metres (3,907 ft) just south of the Monte Rosa, elevation 4,638 metres (15,217 ft) ; It is very close to Milan and to the international Milan–Malpensa Airport.

Brusson, Aosta Valley Comune in Aosta Valley, Italy

Brusson is a town and comune in Val d'Ayas, a left minor valley of the Aosta Valley region in Italy.

Cogne Comune in Aosta Valley, Italy

Cogne is a town and comune (municipality) in Aosta Valley, northern Italy, with 1369 inhabitants, as of 2017.

Ayas, Aosta Valley Comune in Aosta Valley, Italy

Ayas is a comune sparso in the Aosta Valley region of northwestern Italy, with 1359 inhabitants in 2010.

Fontainemore Comune in Aosta Valley, Italy

Fontainemore is a town and comune in the Aosta Valley region of north-western Italy.

Issime Comune in Aosta Valley, Italy

Issime is a town and comune in the Aosta Valley region of north-western Italy. Its population speak Walser German.

La Thuile, Aosta Valley Comune in Aosta Valley, Italy

La Thuile is a town and comune in the Aosta Valley of northwest Italy.

Gressoney-Saint-Jean Comune in Aosta Valley, Italy

Gressoney-Saint-Jean is a town and comune in the Aosta Valley region of north-western Italy.

Riva Valdobbia Frazione in Piedmont, Italy

Riva Valdobbia is a fraction in the Province of Vercelli in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 90 kilometres (56 mi) north of Turin and about 70 kilometres (43 mi) northwest of Vercelli.

Entracque Comune in Piedmont, Italy

Entracque is a small town in the Valle Gesso of the Maritime Alps of north-west Italy, about 20 kilometres (12 mi) southwest of Cuneo and close to the French border. It is the principal settlement and capoluogo of the comune or municipality of the same name in the Piedmontese Province of Cuneo.

Lys (Dora Baltea)

The Lys is a small 40 kilometres (25 mi) river.

Gressonney may refer to two villages and communes in the Aosta Valley region of Italy:

Gressoney was a commune of Aosta Valley in north-west Italy. It was created in 1928 by the union of the two existing communes of Gressoney-La-Trinité and Gressoney-Saint-Jean. From 1939 onwards its official name was Italianized as Gressonei. The commune was suppressed in 1946 when the two former communes were reconstituted.

Champoluc Place in Aosta Valley, Italy

Champoluc is a village in the commune of Ayas, in the province of Aosta Valley, Northern Italy.

Vincent Pyramid

The Vincent Pyramid is a mountain of the Pennine Alps, located on the border between the Italian regions of Aosta Valley and Piedmont. The Vincent Pyramid makes up a large buttress of the huge multi-summited Monte Rosa. It lies south of the Ludwigshöhe on the border with Switzerland, between the Lysgletscher and the Piode Glacier. A seconday summit of the Vincent Pyramid, the Punta Giordani/Giordanispétz, lies to the southeast. Both Vincent Pyramid and Punta Giordani are on the official UIAA list of Alpine four-thousanders.

The Monterosa Ski is an Italian ski resort, at the foots of Monte Rosa the second tallest mountain in the Alps, which links three valleys, located largely in the Aosta Valley and the remainder in Piedmont. Much of the area consists of easy and intermediate skiing, but the area around the Passo dei Salati and especially the steep slopes in Alagna Valsesia are a major and very famous destination for freeride skiers and snow-boarders.

References

  1. "Superficie di Comuni Province e Regioni italiane al 9 ottobre 2011". Istat. Retrieved 16 March 2019.
  2. "Popolazione Residente al 1° Gennaio 2018". Istat. Retrieved 16 March 2019.
  3. www.visitmonterosa.com/en/news-en/historical-and-cultural-identities-in-gressoney/
  4. "History - Municipality of Gressoney-La-Trinité". www.comune.gressoneylatrinite.ao.it. Retrieved 2021-03-23.
  5. "History - Municipality of Gressoney-La-Trinité". www.comune.gressoneylatrinite.ao.it. Retrieved 2021-03-23.
  6. Flurnamen Fein Weisser Fleck. Letter by Rolf Marti, Gstaad, in: Die Alpen, June 2011, p.29
  7. "Das Vaterunser auf Walserisch (Greschòney)" (in Walser). Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitungs. 2006. Retrieved 2011-05-13.