Gryazev-Shipunov GSh-30-1

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GSh-30-1
GSh-301 cropped.jpg
GSh-30-1
TypeAircraft autocannon
Place of origin Soviet Union
Service history
In service1980–present
Production history
DesignerV. Gryazev, A. Shipunov
Designed1977
Manufacturer Izhmash
Produced1980–present
Specifications
Mass46 kg (101 lb)
Length1,978 mm (77.87 in)
Barrel  length1,500 mm (59.06 in)
Width156 mm (6.14 in)
Height185 mm (7.28 in)

Shell 30×165mm
Caliber 30mm
Barrels1
Action Short recoil operated
Rate of fire 1,500–1,800 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity 900 m/s
Effective firing range200-1,800m
Maximum firing range1,800m

The Gryazev-Shipunov GSh-30-1 [1] (also known by the GRAU index designation 9A-4071K) is a 30 mm autocannon designed for use on Soviet and later Russian military aircraft, entering service in the early 1980s. Its current manufacturer is the Russian company JSC Izhmash.

Contents

Description

The GSh-30-1 is a single-barreled, recoil operated autocannon weighing 46 kg (101 lb). Unlike many postwar cannons, it uses a short recoil action instead of a revolver cannon or Gatling gun mechanism. This results in a reduced rate of fire, but lower weight and bulk.

The GSh-30-1 has a rate of fire of 1,800 rounds per minute, customarily limited to 1,500 rounds per minute to reduce barrel wear. Despite that, its barrel life is quite short: 2,000 rounds. With a continuous burst rated for 150 rounds [2] The gun uses an evaporation cooling system to prevent the detonation of a high explosive round inside a heated barrel. This cooling system consists of a cylindrical water tank around the rear end of the barrel. The GSh-30-1 is equipped with a unique pyrotechnic mechanism to clear misfires: a small pyrotechnic cartridge is located to the left of the 30mm cartridge chamber. This pyrotechnic cartridge fires a small steel bolt through the side wall of the 30mm cartridge. The hot propellant gases following the bolt into the dud 30mm round ignite the powder charge of that round and firing continues.

The gun's maximum effective range against aerial targets is 200 to 800 m and against surface or ground targets is 1,200 to 1,800 m.

In combination with a laser rangefinding/targeting system, it is reported to be extremely accurate as well as powerful, capable of destroying a target with as few as three to five rounds. It has been deployed on several different types of fighter aircraft:

Ammunition

The 30x165 mm rounds, fitted with distance-armed and delayed action fuze, are commonly fired from the GSh-30-1. This type of ammunition is intended to engage air and ground targets. The 30x165 mm round can have several projectiles. Its variants are: [3]

Users

See also

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References

  1. "Born in the USSR: Russia's most vicious Soviet mini-artillery guns - Russia Beyond".
  2. https://i.imgur.com/qtgqb2R.jpg
  3. 30x165 mm Rounds, Armaco JSC - Bulgaria