Gryazev-Shipunov GSh-6-23

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Gryazev-Shipunov GSh-6-23
Izhmash museum-15.jpg
GSh-6-23M on the installation of 9-EYU-768K, designed to equip the MiG-31 interceptor
Type Rotary cannon
Place of origin Soviet Union
Service history
In service1975-present
Production history
DesignerVassily P. Gryazev and Arkady G. Shipunov
Manufacturer KBP Instrument Design Bureau Tula
Specifications
Mass73–76 kg (161–167 lb)
Length1.4 m (4 ft 7 in)
Height18 cm (7 in)

Cartridge 23×115mm AM-23
Caliber 23 mm
Barrels6
Action Gas-operated
Rate of fire 6,000–8,000 (standard). [1] 9,000–10,000 rpm (alleged maximum). [2]
Muzzle velocity 715 m/s (2345 ft/s)
Feed systemBelt or linkless feed system

The Gryazev-Shipunov GSh-6-23 (Russian : Грязев-Шипунов ГШ-6-23) (GRAU designation: 9A-620 for GSh-6-23, 9A-768 for GSh-6-23M modernized variant) is a six-barreled 23 mm rotary cannon used by some modern Soviet/Russian military aircraft. [3]

Contents

The GSh-6-23 differs from most American multi-barreled aircraft cannon in that it is gas-operated, rather than externally powered via an electric, hydraulic, or pneumatic system.

Second from the left GSh-6-23 Tula State Museum of Weapons (79-54).jpg
Second from the left GSh-6-23

The GSh-6-23 uses the 23×115 Russian AM-23 round, fed via linked cartridge belt or a linkless feed system. [4] The linkless system, adopted after numerous problems and failures with the belt feed, is limited. [5] [ better source needed ] Fire control is electrical, using a 27 V DC system. The cannon has 10 pyrotechnic cocking charges, similar to those used in European gas-operated revolver cannon such as the DEFA 554 or Mauser BK-27.

The rapid rate of fire exhausts ammunition quickly: the Mikoyan MiG-31 aircraft, for example, with 260 rounds of ammunition (800 rounds maximum), would empty its ammunition tank in less than two seconds.

GSh-6-23M has the highest rate of fire out of any autocannon so far. [6]

The GSh-6-23 is used by the Sukhoi Su-24 attack aircraft, the MiG-31 interceptor aircraft, and the now-obsolete Sukhoi Su-15 among others. However, after two Su-24s were lost because of premature shell detonation in 1983, and because of some other problems with gun usage (such as system failures), usage of the GSh-6-23 was stopped by a decision of the Soviet Air Force Command. At present all aircraft in the Russian Air Force are flying with fully operational guns. [7]

It is also used in the SPPU-6 gun pod, which can traverse to −45° elevation, and ±45° azimuth. [8]

Variants

See also

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Yefim Gordon is a Lithuanian aircraft photographer and author who specializes in Soviet aircraft and Russian aviation.

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Gryazev-Shipunov may refer to:

References

  1. Gordon, Komissarov, Yefim, Dmitriy (30 October 2011). Flight Craft 8: Mikoyan MiG-31: Defender of the Homeland. ISBN   9781473869202.
  2. Skaarup, Harold (May 2008). Canadian MiG Flights. ISBN   9780595520718.
  3. Gordon, Yefim; Komissarov, Dmitriy (30 October 2011). Flight Craft 8: Mikoyan MiG-31: Defender of the Homeland. ISBN   9781473869202.
  4. "From 20mm to 25mm - The Russian Ammunition Page" . Retrieved 26 November 2014.
  5. "Untitled Document" . Retrieved 26 November 2014.
  6. "GSh-6-23M".
  7. "Untitled Document" . Retrieved 26 November 2014.
  8. http://weaponsystems.net/weaponsystem/HH13%20-%20SPPU-6.html

Sources