Guanwen

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Guanwen (Chinese :官文; pinyin :Guānwén; Manchu: ᡤᡠᠸᠠᠨᠸᡝᠨguwanwen; created Count Yiyong of the First Class 勇毅一等伯) (1798 1871) courtesy name Xiufeng (秀峰), was a Manchu official, Grand Secretariat, military general, Viceroy of Zhili, Huguan and commander of the Army Group Central Plain during the late Qing Dynasty in China.

Guanwen was born in a Manchu clan Wanggiya. He raised the Green Standard Army to fight effectively against the Taiping Rebellion and restored the stability of Qing Dynasty along with other prominent figures, including Zuo Zongtang and Li Hongzhang, setting the scene for the era later known as the "Tongzhi Restoration" (同治中兴). He was known for his strategic perception and administrative skill.

Oversight of the Xiang Army

Guanwen was appointed Viceroy of Huguang from 1856 when the civil war. This was after two previous holders of the post had been killed in battle and another had committed suicide. Guanwen led the 600,000-strong Green Standard Army in the Central Plain.

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References

Government offices
Preceded by
Young Pei
(acting)
Viceroy of Huguang
18551867
Succeeded by
Li Hongzhang
Preceded by
Liu Changyou
(acting)
Viceroy of Zhili
18671868
Succeeded by
Zeng Guofan