Guards Chapel, Wellington Barracks

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Guards Chapel
Guards Chapel, Wellington Barracks - East end - geograph.org.uk - 351924.jpg
Alternative namesRoyal Military Chapel, St. James Park
General information
Town or city London
Country United Kingdom
Completed1839–1840
Listed Building – Grade II*
Designated9 January 1970
Amended 26 April 2012
Part ofRoyal Military chapel and cloister, south of Birdcage Walk, Wellington Barracks
Reference no.1066441 [1]

The Royal Military Chapel, St James Park, known as the Guards Chapel, is the religious home of the Household Division at the Wellington Barracks in London. Constructed between 1839–40 in the style of a Grecian temple and restored in the 1870s, [2] the chapel was damaged by German bombing during the Blitz in 1940/1941.

Wellington Barracks barracks of the British Army in Westminster, London

Wellington Barracks is a military barracks in Westminster, central London, for the Foot Guards battalions on public duties in that area. The building is located about three hundred yards from Buckingham Palace, allowing the guard to be able to reach the palace very quickly in an emergency, and lies between Birdcage Walk and Petty France. Three companies are based at the barracks, as well as all of the Foot Guards bands and the regimental headquarters.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of both England and the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

The Blitz bombing of London during WWII

The Blitz was a German bombing campaign against Britain in 1940 and 1941, during the Second World War. The term was first used by the British press and is the German word for 'lightning'.

Contents

The Flanders Fields Memorial Garden is situated adjacent to the chapel. [3]

Flanders Fields Memorial Garden memorial garden in London

The Flanders Fields Memorial Garden is a monument dedicated to the participants of World War I situated alongside the Guards Chapel at Wellington Barracks in Central London, England.

On the last Tuesday of each month, except August, the Chapel hosts a free 45-minute lunchtime concert featuring a wide variety of music.

World War II attacks

On Sunday 18 June 1944 the chapel was hit again, this time by a V1 during the morning service. The explosion of the V1 collapsed the concrete roof onto the congregation, with 121 killed and 141 injured persons (military and civilians).

V-1 flying bomb cruise missile

The V-1 flying bomb —also known to the Allies as the buzz bomb, or doodlebug, and in Germany as Kirschkern (cherrystone) or Maikäfer (maybug)—was an early cruise missile and the only production aircraft to use a pulsejet for power.

Using the memorials from the old chapel as foundations, [2] in the 1960s it was rebuilt in a modern style. In 1970 it was given Grade II* listed status. [1]

Listed building Collection of protected architectural creations in the United Kingdom

A listed building, or listed structure, is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England in England, Historic Environment Scotland in Scotland, Cadw in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland.

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References

  1. 1 2 Historic England, "Guards Chapel (1066441)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 4 January 2018
  2. 1 2 Bromley & Bromley 2015, p. 585.
  3. "The Queen leads remembrance events in London". BBC News Online. 6 November 2014. Retrieved 6 November 2014.
Bibliography
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Coordinates: 51°30′01″N0°08′08″W / 51.5003°N 0.1356°W / 51.5003; -0.1356