Guggenheim Fellowship

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Guggenheim Fellowships are grants that have been awarded annually since 1925(99 years ago) by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, endowed by the late Simon and Olga Hirsh Guggenheim. [1] These awards are bestowed upon individuals who have demonstrated distinguished accomplishment in the past and potential for future achievement. The recipients exhibit outstanding aptitude for prolific scholarship or exceptional talent in the arts. [2] [3] [4]

Contents

The foundation holds two separate competitions each year: [5]

The performing arts are excluded from these fellowships, but composers, film directors, and choreographers are still eligible to apply. While students are not qualified to apply, advanced professionals in mid-career, such as published authors, are encouraged to do so. Upon receipt of the grant, Fellows are free to use the funds however they deem fit. [7] [1] The goal of the grant is to provide recipients with dedicated time and freedom to pursue their projects or artistic endeavours, while being relieved of their regular duties. [8] [9] Applicants are required to submit references as well as a CV and portfolio.

As of 2020, the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation has funded 18,000 Fellows with a total sum of over $375 million since its inception. [10] Each year, the foundation receives a high number of applications; since its formation it has seen anywhere between 500 and 4,000 applications. [5] [7] [8] Out of these, approximately 175 Fellowships are awarded. [11] The size of each grant varies and the amount and duration of the grant is adjusted based on the individual needs of the recipients, [12] taking into consideration their other resources and the purpose and scope of their plans. The average grant awarded is between $40,000 and $55,000. [13] [14]

University affiliations of Guggenheim fellows

Pulitzer Prize for Poetry-winning poet and writer Stephen Vincent Benet authored "John Brown's Body" as a Guggenheim Fellow in Paris in 1926 Stephen Vincent Benet Yale College BA 1919.jpg
Pulitzer Prize for Poetry-winning poet and writer Stephen Vincent Benét authored "John Brown's Body" as a Guggenheim Fellow in Paris in 1926

Since the inaugural class of 1925, over 18,000 fellowships have been awarded. Harvard University counts the most affiliated fellows at 176, followed by Yale University at 102, Princeton University at 96, Berkeley at 73, and Columbia University at 72. [15]

InstitutionFellows (1925-2022)
Harvard University176
Yale University 102
Princeton University 96
University of California, Berkeley 73
Columbia University72
Stanford University 65
University of Chicago 64
Cornell University 54
University of Pennsylvania 51
University of Michigan 41

    † Harvard includes Radcliffe and Columbia includes Barnard

    Lists of Guggenheim Fellows

    1920s 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929
    1930s 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939
    1940s 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949
    1950s 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959
    1960s 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
    1970s 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979
    1980s 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989
    1990s 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
    2000s 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
    2010s 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
    2020s 2020 2021 2022 2023

    See also

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    References

    1. 1 2 "Guggenheimers". TIME Magazine. 27 (14). June 1936.
    2. "Electronic Cafe International Founders Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz Named Guggenheim Fellows". Cultural Studies. 14 (1): 132–133. January 2000.
    3. "Eleven Researchers, Artistes Awarded Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowships". News India Times. 49 (16): 12–12. 2018-04-20.
    4. "Several Indian-Americans Among 2022 Guggenheim Fellows". News India Times. 53 (16): 10–10. 2022-04-22.
    5. 1 2 "Guggenheim Fellowships Awards 2011". Art Nexus. 10 (82): 58–60. September 2011.
    6. "How to Apply". John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Retrieved August 1, 2022.
    7. 1 2 "Several Of Indian Origin Among 171 Recipients Of Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship". News India Times. 54 (17): 7–7. 2023-04-28.
    8. 1 2 Elfman, Lois (July 2021). "CUNY Professor Wins Guggenheim Fellowship". Women in Higher Education (10608303). 30 (7): 13–15. doi:10.1002/whe.21015.
    9. Little, Myles (2015-04-14). "Photojournalist Moises Saman Receives Guggenheim Fellowship". Time.com: N.PAG.
    10. "DG Members Receive Guggenheim Fellowship". Dramatist. 22 (6): 7–7. July 2020.
    11. "The Fellowship". John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Retrieved 2009-08-11.
    12. "At Least Four Individuals Of Indian Origin Win Prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship For 2021". News India Times. 52 (17): 12–12. 2021-04-23.
    13. "Frequently Asked Questions". John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Retrieved 2009-08-11.
    14. Jones, Dylon (July 2014). "The End of Striving". Louisville Magazine. 65 (7): 93–103.
    15. "Search Fellows". gf.org. Retrieved February 15, 2022.