Guido Seeber

Last updated
Guido Seeber. Bundesarchiv N 1275 Bild-289, Guido Seeber mit Filmtrockentrommel.jpg
Guido Seeber.
Grave of Guido Seeber in Friedhof Heerstrasse, Berlin-Westend Guido Seeber, Friedhof Heerstrasse - Mutter Erde fec.JPG
Grave of Guido Seeber in Friedhof Heerstraße, Berlin-Westend

Guido Seeber (22 June 1879 in Chemnitz – 2 July 1940 in Berlin) was a German cinematographer and pioneer of early cinema.

Contents

Seeber's father, Clemens, was a photographer and therefore Seeber had experience with photography from an early age. In the summer of 1896, he saw the first films of the Lumière Brothers and became fascinated by this new technology. He bought a film camera and devoted himself to the development of cinematography and of sound films.

In 1908 he became technical manager of the film company Deutsche Bioscop [1] and in 1909 directed his first film. His pioneering work as a cinematographer from this time on laid the foundations which other cameramen of German silent film such as Karl Freund, Fritz Arno Wagner and Carl Hoffmann were able to build.

In addition to his technical talents with the camera (he developed several special effects techniques), his use of perspective and skillful contrasts between light and dark are noteworthy. His main collaborators were the directors Urban Gad, Lupu Pick, Georg Wilhelm Pabst und Paul Wegener and among his most important accomplishments are the shots of the Doppelgänger in Wegener's Der Student von Prag (The Student of Prague) of 1913 and the moving camera shots in the films of Lupu Pick, particularly Sylvester (1923), which can be seen as anticipating the so-called "unchained camera" of Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau's The Last Laugh (1924).

Seeber created several animated works, including an advertisement entitle Kipho or Du musst zur Kipho (You Must Go to Kino-Photo) for a film and photography exhibition in Berlin in 1925. [2]

Seeber continued to work into the sound era, but his work from this period is less significant. He had suffered a stroke in 1932 and after this he largely retired from active camera operation. However, he continued to be involved in the film industry, taking over the management of UFA's animation department in 1935 and publishing several books for amateur filmmakers.

Selected filmography

Related Research Articles

Paul Wegener German actor, writer and film director

Paul Wegener was a German actor, writer and film director known for his pioneering role in German expressionist cinema.

Mutz Greenbaum, sometimes credited as Max Greene or Max Greenbaum, was a Berlin, Germany-born film cinematographer.

Adele Sandrock German actress

Adele Sandrock was a German-Dutch actress. After a successful theatrical career, she became one of the first German movie stars.

Walter Ruttmann was a German cinematographer and film director, and along with Hans Richter, Viking Eggeling and Oskar Fischinger was the most important German representative of abstract experimental film. He is best known for directing the semi-documentary 'city symphony' silent film Berlin: Symphony of a Metropolis. His audio montage Wochenende (1930) is considered a major contribution in the development of audio plays.

Max Skladanowsky German inventor and early filmmaker

Max Skladanowsky was a German inventor and early filmmaker. Along with his brother Emil, he invented the Bioscop, an early movie projector the Skladanowsky brothers used to display the first moving picture show to a paying audience on 1 November 1895, shortly before the public debut of the Lumière Brothers' Cinématographe in Paris on 28 December 1895.

Charlotte Ander German actress

Charlotte Ander was a German actress.

Lee Parry German actress

Lee Parry was a German film actress of the silent era. She appeared in 48 films between 1919 and 1939.

Giuseppe Becce was an Italian-born film score composer who enriched the German cinema.

Gerhard Lamprecht German film director

Gerhard Lamprecht was a German film director, screenwriter and film historian. He directed 63 films between 1920 and 1958. He also wrote for 26 films between 1918 and 1958.

Otto Gebühr German actor

Otto Gebühr was a German theatre and film actor, who appeared in 102 films released between 1917 and 1954. He is noted for his performance as the Prussian king Frederick the Great in numerous films.

Friedrich Kayßler German actor

Friedrich Kayßler was a German theatre and film actor. He appeared in 56 films between 1913 and 1945.

Georg John 1879–1941; German stage and film actor

Georg John was a German stage and film actor.

Hans Brausewetter German actor

Hans Brausewetter was a German stage and film actor of the silent era. He appeared in 135 films between 1922 and 1945. He appeared in the 1923 film The Treasure, which was directed by Georg Wilhelm Pabst. He was killed by a bomb blast in Berlin during the final days of the Second World War.

Fritz Arno Wagner is considered one of the most acclaimed German cinematographers from the 1920s to the 1950s. He played a key role in the Expressionist film movement during the Weimar period and is perhaps best known for excelling "in the portrayal of horror" according to noted film critic Lotte H. Eisner.

Ludwig Berger was a German-Jewish film director, screenwriter and theatre director. He directed 36 films between 1920 and 1969. Berger began working in the German film industry during the Weimar Republic. At Decla-Bioscop and later UFA he established a reputation as a leading director of silent films. He emigrated to Hollywood, but was unable to establish himself and returned to Europe. He subsequently worked both in France and Germany. He was a member of the jury at the 6th Berlin International Film Festival.

Erich John Waschneck was a German cameraman, director, screenwriter and film producer.

Jaro Fürth Austrian actor (1871-1945)

Jaro Fürth was an Austrian stage and film actor.

Hermann Picha was a German stage and film actor. Picha was extremely prolific, appearing in over 300 short and feature films during the silent and early sound eras. Picha played a mixture of lead and supporting roles during his career. He played the title role in the 1920 film Wibbel the Tailor directed by Manfred Noa. He appeared in Fritz Lang's Destiny.

Aafa Film or Aafa-Film was a German film production and distribution company which operated during the 1920s and 1930s. Established in 1920 as Radio-Film the company was controlled by the producer Gabriel Levy and the director Rudolf Dworsky. The company was one of the leading producers of the Weimar Republic, and survived the transition from silent to sound film in 1929. It made the first German full sound film It's You I Have Loved that year. During the early 1930s Aafa produced a number of mountain films directed by Arnold Fanck. It also made a multi-language version musical Lieutenant, Were You Once a Hussar? (1930).

Franz Stein (1880–1958) was a German cinematographer and film actor. During the silent era he shot a number of films, many of them for National Film. After 1925 his film appearances were exclusively as an actor.

References

  1. Deutsche Bioscop GmbH (de) on IMDb
  2. Bendazzi, Giannalberto (1994). Cartoons: One hundred years of cinema animation . Translated by Anna Taraboletti-Segre. Indiana University Press. p.  26. ISBN   0-253-20937-4.

Sources