Gunnar Thorvaldson

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Gunnar Solmunder (Solly) Thorvaldson, QC (March 18, 1901 – August 2, 1969) was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1941 to 1949, and in the Senate of Canada from 1958 until his death. Originally elected as a Conservative, he sat as a Progressive Conservative after the party changed its name in 1943. [1]

Queens Counsel Jurist appointed by letters patent in some Commonwealth realms

A Queen's Counsel, or King's Counsel during the reign of a king, is a lawyer who is appointed by the monarch of the United Kingdom to be one of "Her Majesty's Counsel learned in the law." The term is recognised as an honorific. The position exists in some Commonwealth jurisdictions around the world, but other Commonwealth countries have either abolished the position, or re-named it to eliminate monarchical connotations, such as "Senior Counsel" or "Senior Advocate". Queen's Counsel is an office, conferred by the Crown, that is recognised by courts. Members have the privilege of sitting within the bar of court.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

Legislative Assembly of Manitoba form the Legislature of Manitoba, Canada

The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba is the deliberative assembly of the Manitoba Legislature in the Canadian province of Manitoba. Fifty-seven members are elected to this assembly at provincial general elections, all in single-member constituencies with first-past-the-post voting. Bills passed by the Legislative Assembly are given royal assent by the Queen of Canada in Right of Manitoba, represented by the Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba. The Manitoba Legislative Building is located in central Winnipeg, at the meeting point of the Wolseley and Fort Rouge constituencies.

Contents

Thorvaldson was born in Riverton, Manitoba to a notable Icelandic Canadian family. His father, Sveinn Thorvaldson, was also a Conservative member of the Assembly from 1914 to 1915. [2]

Riverton, Manitoba village in Manitoba, Canada

Riv city is an unincorporated urban community in the Municipality of Bifrost – Riv city within the Canadian province of Manitoba that held village status prior to January 1, 2015. It is located approximately 110 kilometres north of Winnipeg. The CPR's train conductor is reputed to have named the community.

Manitoba Province of Canada

Manitoba is a province at the longitudinal centre of Canada. It is often considered one of the three prairie provinces and is Canada's fifth-most populous province with its estimated 1.3 million people. Manitoba covers 649,950 square kilometres (250,900 sq mi) with a widely varied landscape, stretching from the northern oceanic coastline to the southern border with the United States. The province is bordered by the provinces of Ontario to the east and Saskatchewan to the west, the territories of Nunavut to the north, and Northwest Territories to the northwest, and the U.S. states of North Dakota and Minnesota to the south.

Sveinn Thorvaldson was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1914 to 1915, as a member of the Conservative Party.

His nephew Scott Thorkelson served in the Canadian House of Commons. [1]

Scott Jon Thorkelson was a member of the House of Commons of Canada from 1988 to 1993. His background was in research, consulting and fundraising.

Career

He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Saskatchewan in 1922 and a law degree from the Manitoba Law School in 1925. He worked as a barrister. Thorvaldson was also president of the Income Tax Payer's Association from 1944 to 1946, and was a member of the Manitoba Club, the Empire Club and the Optimist Club. In 1926, he married Edna Schwitzer, daughter of John Edward Schwitzer. [2]

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

University of Saskatchewan university

The University of Saskatchewan is a Canadian public research university, founded on March 19, 1907, and located on the east side of the South Saskatchewan River in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. An "Act to establish and incorporate a University for the Province of Saskatchewan" was passed by the provincial legislature in 1907. It established the provincial university on March 19, 1907 "for the purpose of providing facilities for higher education in all its branches and enabling all persons without regard to race, creed or religion to take the fullest advantage". The University of Saskatchewan is the largest education institution in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. The University of Saskatchewan is one of Canada’s top research universities and is a member of the U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities.

John Edward Schwitzer was assistant chief engineer for the Canadian Pacific Railway in the early 1900s. He was known for two major projects on the CPR, both that removed costly bottlenecks on the routes.

Elections

He ran for the Manitoba legislature in the constituency of Gimli in the 1932 provincial election, but finished third against Liberal Einar Jonasson. [1]

The 1932 Manitoba general election was held on June 16, 1932 to elect Members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Manitoba, Canada.

Manitoba Liberal Party centrist political party in Manitoba, Canada

The Manitoba Liberal Party is a political party in Manitoba, Canada. Its roots can be traced to the late nineteenth-century, following the province's creation in 1870.

Einar Sigurjon Jonasson was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1932 to 1935, as a member of the Liberal-Progressive Party.

Thorvaldson ran for the House of Commons of Canada in the 1935 federal election as a candidate of the Conservative Party of Canada. He lost, finishing a distant second against Liberal-Progressive candidate Joseph T. Thorson in the riding of Selkirk. [1]

House of Commons of Canada Lower house of the Canadian Parliament

The House of Commons of Canada is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign and the Senate. The House of Commons currently meets in a temporary Commons chamber in the West Block of the parliament buildings on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, while the Centre Block, which houses the traditional Commons chamber, undergoes a ten-year renovation.

1935 Canadian federal election

The Canadian federal election of 1935 was held on October 14, 1935. to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada of the 18th Parliament of Canada. The Liberal Party of William Lyon Mackenzie King won a majority government, defeating Prime Minister R. B. Bennett's Conservatives.

Selkirk was a federal electoral district in Manitoba, Canada, that was represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1871 to 1979.

He ran for the Manitoba legislature for the second time in the 1936 provincial election, this time campaigning in the constituency of Winnipeg, which elected ten members by a single transferable ballot. He finished twelfth on the first count, did poorly on transfers and was eliminated on the eleventh ballot.

Thorvaldson was finally successful on his fourth attempt at elected office, in the 1941 provincial election. He again ran in Winnipeg, [3] and this time finishing seventh on the first count. Subsequent counts confirmed his position, and he was finally declared elected on the nineteenth ballot. The Liberal-Progressives and Conservatives were partners in a coalition government during this period, and Thorvaldson served as a backbench supporter of the ministries of John Bracken and Stuart Garson.

He was re-elected in the 1945 election, [3] finishing eighth on the first count and securing election on the fifteenth ballot.

Thorvaldson resigned his provincial seat in 1949 to campaign as the Progressive Conservative candidate for Winnipeg South in the Canadian federal election of 1949. He was defeated by Liberal Leslie Alexander Mutch, and did seek a return to elected office. [1]

Appointments

Thorvaldson was appointed a King's Counsel in 1942. In 1954-55, he became the first lawyer to serve as president of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. [2]

In 1958, Thorvaldson was appointed to the Canadian Senate by Prime Minister John Diefenbaker. He served as president of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1959 to 1954, [1] and was named to Canada's United Nations delegation. In 1968, he was awarded the Order of the Falcon by the President of Iceland.

Death

Thorvaldson died at the age of 68 of a heart attack while golfing in Winnipeg. [4]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Gunnar Thorvaldson – Parliament of Canada biography
  2. 1 2 3 "Gunnar Solmunder Thorvaldson (1901-1969)". Manitoba Historical Society. Retrieved 2013-04-28.
  3. 1 2 "MLA Biographies - Deceased". Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. Archived from the original on 2014-03-30.
  4. "Winnipeg senator dies". Edmonton Journal. August 5, 1969. p. 6. Retrieved 2013-04-28.