Gus McNaughton

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Gus McNaughton
Actor Gus McNaughton.jpg
in The 39 Steps (1935)
Born(1881-07-29)29 July 1881
Hornsey, London, England
Died18 November 1969(1969-11-18) (aged 88)
OccupationActor
Years active1930–1947
Spouse Charlotte Poluski (? - ?)

Gus McNaughton (29 July 1881 18 November 1969), also known as Augustus Le Clerq and Augustus Howard, [1] [2] was an English film actor. He appeared in 70 films between 1930 and 1947. He was born in London and died in Castor, Cambridgeshire. [3] He is sometimes credited as Gus MacNaughton. [4] He appeared on stage from 1899, as a juvenile comedian with the Fred Karno company, the influential British music hall troupe. In films, McNaughton was often cast as the "fast-talking sidekick", and he appeared in several popular George Formby comedies of the 1930s and 1940s. [5] He also appeared twice for director Alfred Hitchcock in both Murder! (1930) and The 39 Steps (1935). [6]

Contents

Filmography

Theatre

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References

  1. Michael Kilgarriff (1998). Grace, Beauty & Banjos. Oberon. p. 245. ISBN   9781840021165.
  2. Joseph F. Clarke (1977). Pseudonyms. BCA. p. 108.
  3. "Gus McNaughton". BFI. Archived from the original on 11 July 2012.
  4. "Gus McNaughton". hitchcock.zone.
  5. Hal Erickson. "Gus McNaughton - Biography, Movie Highlights and Photos - AllMovie". AllMovie.
  6. "Gus McNaughton". aveleyman.com.
  7. At the Bristol Hippodrome ( 9–14 February 1931), with Gus McNaughton, Eddie Childs, Sybil Woodruffe, Felice Lascelles, Phyllis Palmer, Kenneth Berrell, Hawes Cowan, Beryl Adair, Jack McNaughton.