Gus Tebell

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Gus Tebell
Gustebell.jpg
Tebell, c. 1927
Biographical details
Born(1897-09-06)September 6, 1897
St. Charles, Illinois
DiedMay 28, 1969(1969-05-28) (aged 71)
Richmond, Virginia
Playing career
Football
1920–1922 Wisconsin
1923–1924 Columbus Tigers
Basketball
1920–1923 Wisconsin
Position(s) End (football)
Guard (basketball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1923 Columbus Tigers
1924 NC State (assistant)
1925–1929 NC State
1930–1933 Virginia (assistant)
1934–1936 Virginia
Basketball
1924–1929 NC State
1930–1951 Virginia
Baseball
1931–1943 Virginia
1945–1955 Virginia
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1951–1962 Virginia
Head coaching record
Overall2–0–1 (NFL)
27–43–6 (college football)
319–226 (college basketball)
266–189–9 (college baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 SoCon (1927)
Awards
Football
All-American, 1922

Gustave Kenneth Tebell (September 6, 1897 – May 28, 1969) was an American football, basketball, and baseball player, coach, and college athletics administrator. From 1925 to 1929, he coached football at North Carolina State University, where he compiled a 21–25–2 record. From 1934 to 1936, he coached at the University of Virginia, where he compiled a 6–18–4 record. From 1930 to 1951, he served as the head men's basketball coach at Virginia, achieving his first championship in just his second year. During that tenure, he compiled a 240–190 record, including a NIT berth in 1941. His 240 wins rank fourth in school history. In 1951 he became Athletic Director. Tebell also coached baseball at Virginia from 1941 to 1943 and from 1945 to 1955.

Contents

Tebell played football and basketball at the University of Wisconsin. As an end on the football team, he was selected a second-team All-American by the New York Times. [1] After graduating, he played for the Columbus Tigers of the National Football League (NFL) in 1923 and 1924 and coached three of the team's games in 1923.

Tebell employed the “Meanwell System” on offense, named for its creator, Tebell’s coach at Wisconsin. It featured a double-post alignment with constant cuts, pivots and short passes, and also pioneered the screen. [2]

The University of Virginia honors Tebell by giving an annual award in his name, the Gus Tebell Memorial Award, which is granted each year to the graduating male student-athlete with the highest grade point average through his four years at the university.

Tebell in 1922 Gustebell-1922.jpg
Tebell in 1922

Head coaching record

NFL

TeamYearRegular SeasonPost Season
WonLostTiesWin %FinishWonLostWin %Result
Columbus Tigers 1923 201.6678th----
COL Total201.66700.000
Total201.66700.000

College football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStanding
NC State Wolfpack (Southern Conference)(1925–1929)
1925 NC State 3–5–10–4–118th
1926 NC State 4–60–421st
1927 NC State 9–14–0T–1st
1928 NC State 4–5–11–3–117th
1929 NC State 1–80–522nd
NC State:21–25–25–16–2
Virginia Cavaliers (Southern Conference)(1934–1935)
1934 Virginia 3–61–49th
1935 Virginia 1–5–40–3–2T–8th
Virginia Cavaliers (Independent)(1936)
1936 Virginia 2–7
Virginia:6–18–41–7–2
Total:27–43–6

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The 1936 Virginia Cavaliers football team represented the University of Virginia during the 1936 college football season. The Cavaliers were led by third-year head coach Gus Tebell and played their home games at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Virginia. They competed as members of the Southern Conference, finishing with a conference record of 1–5 and a 2–7 record overall. Shortly after the season ended, Virginia decided to leave the Southern Conference in response to the conference's "Graham Plan" that prohibited sports scholarships. In February 1937, head coach Gus Tebell was replaced by former Marquette head coach Frank Murray. Tebell failed to produce a winning season in his three years at Virginia and had an overall record of 6–18–4. He remained at the school to coach the basketball and baseball teams.

References

  1. "M'Carthy Picks Them In Pairs". The Newark Advocate. December 6, 1922.
  2. Cramer, Gary “Cavaliers! A Pictorial History of UVA Basketball”, Spring House Publ., 1983.