Guy Green (filmmaker)

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Guy Green
Guy Green 1992.png
Guy Green, 1992
Born
Guy Mervin Charles Green

(1913-11-05)5 November 1913
Frome, Somerset, England
Died15 September 2005(2005-09-15) (aged 91)
Occupationdirector, cinematographer, camera operator, screenwriter, producer
Years active1933–1986
Spouse(s)Josephine Smith (1948-2005) (His death)
Awards Best Cinematography, Black-and-White
1947 Great Expectations

Guy Mervin Charles Green OBE BSC (5 November 1913 15 September 2005) was an English film director, producer, screenwriter, and cinematographer. In 1946, he won an Oscar as cinematographer for the film Great Expectations . In 2002, Green was given a Lifetime Achievement Award by the BAFTA, and, in 2004, he was named an Officer of the Order of the British Empire for his lifetime contributions to British cinema.

Contents

Biography

Green was born in Frome, Somerset, England. He began working in film in 1929 and became a noted film cinematographer and a founding member of the British Society of Cinematographers. Green became a full-time director of photography in the mid-1940s, working on such films as David Lean's Oliver Twist in 1948.

In about 1955, Green switched to directing, and he moved to Hollywood around 1962. In addition to directing A Patch of Blue (1965), Green also wrote and co-produced the film. After his death, his widow Josephine told AP that it was his proudest accomplishment. Among his other films as director are The Angry Silence (1960), The Mark (1961) (nominated for the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival), Jacqueline Susann's Once Is Not Enough (1975), and The Devil's Advocate (1977).

Green died in his Beverly Hills home from kidney and heart failure, aged 91. In addition to his wife of 57 years, he was survived by his son, Michael; his daughter, Marilyn Feldman; and two grandchildren.

Works

Selected filmography

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