Héctor Martínez Arteche

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Héctor Martínez Arteche was a painter and muralist who was born in Mexico City in 1934, but has spent most of his life in the state of Sonora. Most of mural work can be seen in Hermosillo, Ciudad Obregón and Navojoa, totalling more than 4,000 meters squared. These include Energía, evolución y movimiento, La evolución mística del hombre venado, El universo del hombre, El pueblo de Cajeme and Comunicación I. In addition to this artwork, he has also had a long teaching career, which began in 1948 at the Escuela Nacional de Artes Plásticas at UNAM. His best known oils include Mujer con violeta and Mujer con cobalto. His work has received recognitions such as Concurso Nacional de Pintura Mural in 1953, Medalla de Plata from the state of Sonora in 1992 and was honored by the city of Cajeme for his artistic and teaching work in 2002. His most recent recognition was the Creador Emérito for 2008-2009 for the Region Sur de Sonora. [1] Died on October 3, 2011 at 77. [2]

Mexico City Capital in Mexico

Mexico City, or the City of Mexico, is the capital of Mexico and the most populous city in North America. Mexico City is one of the most important cultural and financial centres in the Americas. It is located in the Valley of Mexico, a large valley in the high plateaus in the center of Mexico, at an altitude of 2,240 meters (7,350 ft). The city has 16 boroughs.

Sonora State of Mexico

Sonora, officially Estado Libre y Soberano de Sonora, is one of 31 states that, with Mexico City, comprise the 32 federal entities of United Mexican States. It is divided into 72 municipalities; the capital city is Hermosillo. Sonora is bordered by the states of Chihuahua to the east, Baja California to the northwest and Sinaloa to the south. To the north, it shares the U.S.–Mexico border with the states of Arizona and New Mexico, and on the west has a significant share of the coastline of the Gulf of California.

Hermosillo City in Sonora, Mexico

Hermosillo, formerly called Pitic, is a city located centrally in the northwestern Mexican state of Sonora. It is the capital and largest city as well as the main economic center for the state and region. As of 2015, the city has a population of 812,229 inhabitants, making it the 16th largest city in Mexico. The recent city population spur is due to its recent strong industrialization, especially in the automotive industry.

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References

  1. Jimenez Gonzalez, Victor Manuel, ed. (2010). Sonora: Guía para descubrir los encantos del estado[Sonora: Guide to discover the charms of the state] (in Spanish). Mexico City: Editorial Océano de Mexico SA de CV. p. 19. ISBN   978-607-400-319-2.
  2. "Fallece Héctor Martínez Arteche". www.dossierpolitico.com (in Spanish). 4 October 2011. Retrieved 2018-03-05.