H. Fowler Mear

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Harry Fowler Mear
Born16 June 1888
Edmonton, London, United Kingdom
DiedMay 1985
Exeter, Devon, United Kingdom
OccupationWriter
Years active1917–1943 (film)

Harry Fowler Mear (16 June 1888 – May 1985) was a British screenwriter. [1] He spent a number of years at Twickenham Film Studios where his work has been described as "competent but uninspired". [2]

Contents

Partial filmography

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References

  1. "H. Fowler Mear". British Film Institute. Archived from the original on 10 March 2008.
  2. Richards (ed.) p.43

Bibliography