H. G. Salsinger

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H. G. Salsinger
H. G. Salsinger.jpg
Born(1885-04-10)April 10, 1885 [1]
DiedNovember 27, 1958(1958-11-27) (aged 73) [2]
OccupationSportswriter
Employer The Detroit News
Spouse(s)Gladys
Children1
Awards J. G. Taylor Spink Award (1968)

Harry George Salsinger (April 10, 1885 November 27, 1958) was an American sportswriter who served as sports editor of The Detroit News for 49 years.

Contents

Biography

Salsinger was born in Springfield, Ohio. [2] In 1907, he started writing for The Cincinnati Post . [3]

In 1909, Salsinger began working at The Detroit News as sports editor, a position he held until his death in 1958. [4] He covered 50 World Series, two Olympic Games, and many other sports including football, golf, tennis, and boxing. [4] Salsinger was also a president of both the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA), [2] and the Football Writers Association of America. [5] Salsinger retired in January 1958 and died 10 months later at Henry Ford Hospital following a long illness. [6] [7]

Salsinger was married to Gladys E. Salsinger. They had a son, Harry G. Salsinger Jr., born in October 1919. [8] At the time of the 1920 United States Census, Salsinger lived with his wife and son at 244 Pingree Avenue in Detroit. [9]

In 1968, the BBWAA posthumously awarded Salsinger the J. G. Taylor Spink Award for his baseball writing. [10] He was inducted into the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame in 2002. [11] [12]

Selected works

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References

  1. "Draft Registration Card" . Selective Service System. September 1918. Retrieved February 28, 2021 via fold3.com.
  2. 1 2 3 "1968 BBWAA Career Excellence Award Winner Harry Salsinger". baseballhall.org. Retrieved February 28, 2021.
  3. "H.G. Salsinger". BaseballLibrary.com. Archived from the original on February 3, 2007. Retrieved January 6, 2007.
  4. 1 2 Twentyman, Tim (January 31, 2008). "Michigan's Finest: Profiles of Previous Inductees: H. G. Salsinger". The Detroit News . Retrieved February 20, 2008.
  5. "Salsinger Heads Football Writers". Sunday Herald. August 6, 1950.
  6. "H.G. Salsinger" (PDF). The New York Times. November 28, 1958.
  7. "SALSINGER, 'OLD PRO' OF SPORTS WRITERS, DIES". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 28, 1958.
  8. "Draft Registration Card" . Selective Service System. July 1941. Retrieved February 28, 2021 via fold3.com.
  9. Census entry for Harry Salsinger and family. Ancestry.com. 1920 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Census Place: Detroit Ward 4, Wayne, Michigan; Roll: T625_805; Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 152; Image: 1072.
  10. Spoelstra, Watson (November 2, 1968). "Salsinger, Ex-Detroit Sports Expert, Wins Spink Award". Sporting News . p. 28.
  11. "Salsinger was special to sports". The Detroit News. December 14, 2001.
  12. "Sports editor taught columnist valuable lesson: Get it in writing". The Detroit News. December 12, 2001.