Half diminished scale

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Half diminished scale
Modes I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII
Component pitches
C, D, E, F, G, A, B
Qualities
Number of pitch classes 7
Forte number 7-34
Complement 5-34

The half diminished scale or Sisyphean Scale is a seven-note musical scale. It is more commonly known as the Locrian 2scale, [1] a name that avoids confusion with the diminished scale and the half-diminished seventh chord (minor seventh, diminished fifth). It is the sixth mode of the ascending form of the melodic minor scale (or jazz scale).

Half diminished scale

In the key of B, the half-diminished scale built on C is associated with Cm75, which functions as a ii ø7 chord in minor (see chord-scale system).

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References

  1. Arnold, Bruce (January 2001). Music Theory Workbook for Guitar: Scale construction and application. muse eek publishing. p. 17. ISBN   1-890944-53-X . Retrieved Jul 10, 2009.