Hambuk Line

Last updated
Hambuk Line
Hambuk Line near Kanpyong.jpg
View of the Hambuk Line near Kanp'yŏng
Overview
StatusOperational
OwnerCh'ŏngjin–Hoeryŏng: Sentetsu (1916–1933)
Hoeryŏng–Tonggwan: Domun Railway (1920–1929)
Hoeryŏng–Tonggwan: Sentetsu (1929–1933)
Tonggwan–Unggi: Sentetsu (1929–1933)
Ch'ŏngjin–Unggi: Mantetsu (1933–1940)
Ch'ŏngjin–Sangsambong: Sentetsu (1940–1945)
Sangsambong–Unggi: Mantetsu (1940–1945)
Unggi–Rajin: Mantetsu (1935–1945)
Ch'ŏngjin–Rajin: Korean State Railway (since 1945)
Locale North Hamgyŏng
Rasŏn
Termini Ch'ŏngjin Ch'ŏngnyŏn
Rajin
Stations51
Service
Type Heavy rail, Regional rail
Depot(s) Hoeryŏng, Sambong
History
OpenedStages between 1916–1935
Technical
Line length325.1 km (202.0 mi)
Number of tracks Double track (Susŏng - Komusan)
Single track
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
partly with 1,520 mm (4 ft 11 2732 in)
(Dual Gauge, Hongŭi-Rajin)
Electrification 3000 V DC Overhead lines
Route map

DPRK-Hambuk Line.png

Contents

Some stations omitted for clarity
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Ch'ŏngjinhang
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-3.1
Ch'ŏngjin Ch'ŏngnyŏn
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Ch'ŏngjin Choch'ajang
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0.0
Panjuk
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Kŭndong
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4.7
Susŏng
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10.3
Sŏngmak
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18.1
Changhŭng
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24.1
Hyŏngje
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Puryŏng Ferroalloy Factory
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32.6
Puryŏng
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38.9
Komusan
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Komusan Cement Factory
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Sŏsang
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44.7
Sŏkpong
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51.4
Ch'angp'yŏng
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58.7
Chŏn'gŏri
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former mine
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89.5
Hoeryŏng Ch'ŏngnyŏn
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93.5
Sinhoeryŏng
Closed
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96.3
Kŭmsaeng
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Kŭngsim-dong
Closed
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Chaokai Line
←DPRK-China
Closed
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129.9
Sambong
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136.2
Hasambong
Closed 1933
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142.1
Chongsŏng
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150.3
Kangalli
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0.8
Gukkyŏng
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169.0
0.0
Namyang
Car shops
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180.4
Unsŏng
mines
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208.2
Hunyung
(Closed)
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237.4
Sin'gŏn
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Ch'undu
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255.0
Songhak
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285.6
0.0
Hongŭi
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1.0
Chŏkchi
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9.5
Tumangang
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286.6
Mulgol
←DPRK~Russia
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Taejin Port
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300.7
Ungsang
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313.0
Sŏnbong
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Sŭngri Line
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3.0
Namrajin
Closed
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Namrajin Branch
Closed
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328.2
0.0
Rajin
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Hambuk Line
Chosŏn'gŭl
Hancha
Revised Romanization Hambukseon
McCune–Reischauer Hambuksŏn

The Hambuk Line is an electrified standard-gauge trunk line of the Korean State Railway in North Korea, running from Ch'ŏngjin) on the P'yŏngra Line to Rajin, likewise on the P'yŏngra line. [1]

The Hambuk line connects to the Hongŭi Line at Hongŭi, which is North Korea's only rail connection to Russia, and at Namyang to the Namyang Border Line, which leads to Tumen, China, via the bridge over the Tumen River. [1]

Although located entirely inside North Hamgyŏng Province, this line is one of the DPRK's main trunk railways. The line's total length is 325.1 km (202.0 mi); in terms of length, it is the second-longest rail line in the country after the P'yŏngra Line, accounting for 7.7% of the national total of railway lines. [2]

Over ten rail lines - secondary mainlines and branchlines - connect to the Hambuk Line, including the Musan Line, the Hoeryŏng Colliery Line, the Kogŏnwŏn Line, the Hoeam Line, and the Hongŭi Line, along with numerous branchlines. The Hambuk Line connects three cities and four counties - Ch'ŏngjin City, Puryŏng County, Hoeryŏng City, Onsŏng County, Kyŏngwŏn County, Kyŏnghŭng County, and the Rason Special City.

In terms of regional characteristics, the Hambuk Line passes through two largely distinct areas. It runs inland in mountainous terrain between Panjuk to Hoeryŏng, then along the Tumen River and the northern border of the country all the way to Rajin. The steepest part of the line is between Puryŏng and Ch'angp'yŏng, where the ruling gradient is over 20‰. Conversely, the route on the Tumen River's bank along the national border is comparatively flat.

There is double track from Susŏng, where the line connects to the Kangdŏk line, to Komusan, where the Musan line begins; the dual-gauge section (standard and Russian gauges) from Hongŭi to Rajin is also double-tracked.

There are service facilities for locomotives in Hoeryŏng and Sambong and for rolling stock in Namyang. [2]

History

The Hambuk Line was created by the combination of a number of lines that were originally built by several different railway companies. [1]

The Ch'ŏngjin–Hoeryŏng section was originally part of the Hamgyŏng Line of the Chosen Government Railway (Sentetsu), completed in three stages between November 1916 and November 1917. [3]

The section from Hoeryŏng to Tonggwan (now called Kangalli) line was built by the privately owned Tomun Railway between 1920 and 1924, and in 1929 was nationalised by Sentetsu, which named it the West Tomun Line. [4] The East Tomun Line, from Tonggwan to Unggi (now Sŏnbong), was built by Sentetsu between 1929 and 1933; after completion of the East Tomun Line, it was merged with the West Tomun Line to create the Tomun Line. [5]

In October 1933, management of the entire line from Ch'ŏngjin to Unggi was transferred to the South Manchuria Railway (Mantetsu); [6] at that time, the Ch'ŏngjin–Sambong section was added to the existing (Wŏnsan–Ch'ŏngjin) Hamgyŏng Line, whilst the Sambong–Unggi section became Mantetsu's North Chosen Line. [7] Mantetsu connected this line to the port at Rajin by opening the Ungna Line from Unggi to Rajin on 1 November 1935. [7]

In 1940, the Ch'ŏngjin–Sambong line was transferred back to the Chosen Government Railway, and was made part of the Hamgyŏng Line running from Wŏnsan to Sambong. An express train from Seoul to Mudanjiang via this line was inaugurated at this time. Until the end of the Pacific War, the Ch'ŏngjin–Sambong section remained part of Sentetsu's Hamgyŏng Line, the Sangsambong–Unggi section and the adjoining branch lines remained part of Mantetsu's North Chosen Line, and the Ungna Line remained part of Mantetsu's network, as well.

Service on the line was suspended after the Soviet invasion at the end of the Pacific War. The damage sustained by the line during the war - including the destruction of the Tumen River bridges at both Hunyung and Sambong - was slow to be repaired due to strained relations between the Soviets and the Korean People's Committees; those two bridges have not been repaired to the present day. However, after the outbreak of the Korean War, the Soviets built a branchline from Baranovsky on the Vladivostok branch of the Soviet Far Eastern Railway to Khasan. The station at Khasan was opened on 28 September 1951, and in 1952 a wooden railway bridge was built across the Tumen River to Tumangang in North Korea, [8] connecting to the newly built Hongŭi Line from Tumangang to Hongŭi on the North Chosen Line.

Following the end of the Korean War, the Ch'ŏngjin–Sambong section of the Hamgyŏng Line, the Sambong–Unggi (renamed Sŏnbong) section of the North Chosen Line, and the Ungna Line from Sambŏng to Rajin were merged to create the Hambuk Line; this line, having been damaged during the war, was rebuilt with Soviet and Chinese assistance. The Korean-Russian Friendship Bridge across the Tumen River was commissioned on 9 August 1959, replacing the temporary wooden bridge, which had grown to be insufficient for the traffic crossing the river, [9] and in 1965 the P'yŏngra Line was completed to Rajin, meeting up with the terminus of the Hambuk Line.

In 2008 work was begun to convert the line from the DPRK–Russia border to the port at Rajin to dual (standard and Russian) gauge, including the entirety of the Hongŭi Line and the Hongŭi-Rajin section of the Hambuk Line. [10]

Construction of a branch from Nongp'o to a new industrial facility was begun in 2018.

Services

Freight

Much of the on-line freight traffic involves the transport of magnetite and ironstone from the Musan Mining Complex and other mines on the Musan Line and coal from mines on the Hoeryŏng Colliery Line and the Kogŏnwŏn Line, to the Kim Chaek Iron & Steel Complex at Kimchaek and the Ch'ŏngjin Steel Works in Ch'ŏngjin, and import-export traffic to and from Russia via the Hongŭi Line and to and from China via Namyanggukkyŏng Line ; the primary exports shipped through Namyang to China are magnetite, talc and steel, and the main import is coke. [2]

Passenger

Three pairs of passenger express trains are known to operate on this line: [1]

There are also long-distance trains between Kalma on the Pyongra Line and Rajin via Ch'ŏngjin and Hoeryŏng; between Ch'ŏngjin and Rajin via Hoeryŏng; between Haeju on the Hwanghae Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line and Onsŏng via Ch'ŏngjin and Hoeryŏng; and between Tanch'ŏn on the P'yŏngra Line and Tumangang via Ch'ŏngjin and Hoeryŏng. [2]

There are also various commuter trains that serve the main industrial zones along the line, including trains 623/624 operating between Rajin and Sŏnbong; [1] between Kogŏnwŏn on the Kogŏnwŏn Line and Hunyung via Singŏn; between Hoeryŏng and Ch'ŏn'gŏ-ri; between Ch'angp'yŏng and Sŏkpong; between Namyang and Hunyung; and between Hoeryŏng and Sech'ŏn via Sinhakp'o. [2]

Route

A yellow background in the "Distance" box indicates that section of the line is not electrified.


Distance (km)Station NameFormer Name
TotalS2STranscribedChosŏn'gŭl (Hanja)TranscribedChosŏn'gŭl (Hanja)Connections
-3.1531.0Ch'ŏngjin Ch'ŏngnyŏn청진청년 (清津青年)Ch'ŏngjin청진 (清津) P'yŏngra Line,
Ch'ŏngjin Port Line
0.03.1Panjuk반죽 (班竹)
4.74.7Susŏng수성 (輸城) Kangdŏk Line
10.35.6Sŏngmak석막 (石幕)
18.17.8Changhŭng장흥 (章興)
24.16.0Hyŏngje형제 (兄弟)
32.68.5Puryŏng부령 (富寧)
38.96.3Komusan고무산 (古茂山) Musan Line
44.75.8Sŏkpong석봉 (石峰)
51.46.7Ch'angp'yŏng창평 (蒼坪)
58.77.3Chŏn'gŏri전거리 (全巨里)
64.86.1P'ungsan풍산 (豊山)
69.44.6Ch'angdu창두 (昌斗)
76.47.0Chungdo중도 (中島)
82.46.0Taedŏk대덕 (大徳)
89.57.1Hoeryŏng Ch'ŏngnyŏn회령 청년 (会寧青年)Hoeryŏng회령 (会寧) Hoeryŏng Colliery Line
90.40.9Sinhoeryŏng신회령 (新会寧)Closed
93.23.7Kŭmsaeng금생 (金生)
98.95.7Koryŏngjin고령진 (高嶺鎮)
104.35.4Sinhakp'o신학포 (新鶴浦) Sech'ŏn Line
107.22.9Hakp'o학포 (鶴浦)
116.69.4Sinjŏn신전 (新田)
123.06.4Kanp'yŏng간평 (間坪)
129.96.9Sambong삼봉 (三峰)Sangsambong상삼봉 (上三峰)
133.13.2Hasambong하삼봉 (下三峰)Closed 1933
139.09.1Chongsŏng종성 (鍾城) Tongp'o Line
144.25.2Soam소암 (小岩)Closed 1944
147.28.2Kangalli강안리 (江岸里)Tonggwan동관 (東關) Sŏngp'yŏng Line
153.15.9Sugup'o수구포 (水口浦)
159.86.7Kangyang강양 (江陽)
165.96.1Namyang남양 (南陽) Namyang Border Line
169.83.9P'ungri풍리 (豊利)
175.96.1Sesŏn세선 (世仙)Closed
180.44.5Unsŏng운성 (穏城)
185.95.5P'ung'in풍인 (豊仁)
195.59.6Hwangp'a황파 (黄坡)
205.19.6Hunyung룬융 (訓戎)
210.55.4Hamyŏn하면 (下面)
214.84.3Saebyŏl새졀 (-)Kyŏngwŏn경원 (慶源)
222.17.3Nongp'o농포 (農圃)
225.93.8Ryongdangri룡당리 (龍洞里)Sŭngryang(承良)
234.38.4Sin'gŏn신건 (新乾) Kogŏnwŏn Line
244.910.6Sinasan신아산 (新阿山)
252.27.3Songhak송학 (松鶴) Ch'undu Line
258.15.9Haksong학송 (鶴松)Aoji아오지 (阿吾地) Hoeam Line
266.88.7Ch'ŏnghak청학 (青鶴)
276.59.7Sahoe사회 (四会)
282.56.0 Hongŭi 홍의 (洪儀) Hongŭi Line
283.51.0Mulgol물골 (-)
289.66.1Kuryongp'yŏng구룡평 (九龍坪)
297.68.0Ungsang웅상 (雄尚)
308.110.5Tongsŏnbong동선봉 (東雄基)
309.912.3Sŏnbong선봉 (先鋒)Unggi웅기 (雄基) Sŭngri Line
??Paekhwa백화 (百花)Closed
316.16.2Kwan'gok관곡 (寛谷)
325.19.0Rajin라진 (羅津) P'yŏngra Line,
Rajin Port Line

Related Research Articles

Rajin station is a railway station in Rajin-guyŏk, Rasŏn Special City, North Korea. It is the junction point and terminus of both the Hambuk and P'yŏngra lines of the Korean State Railway. It is also the starting point of a freight-only branchline to Rajin Port station.

Railway lines in North Korea The railway system of North Korea

North Korea has a railway system consisting of an extensive network of standard-gauge lines and a smaller network of 762 mm (30.0 in) narrow-gauge lines; the latter are to be found around the country, but the most important lines are in the northern part of the country. All railways in North Korea are operated by the state-owned Korean State Railway.

The Hamgyeong Line was a railway line of the Chosen Government Railway (Sentetsu) in Japanese-occupied Korea, running from Wonsan to Sangsambong. Construction began in 1914, and was completed in 1928. The line is now entirely within North Korea; the Korean State Railway has divided it between the Kangwŏn Line, the P'yŏngra Line, the Kangdŏk Line (Namgangdŏk−Suseong), and the Hambuk Line.

Ch'ŏngjin Ch'ŏngnyŏn station is the central railway station in Ch'ŏngjin-si, North Hamgyŏng Province, North Korea. It is the junction point of the Hambuk Line and the P'yŏngra Line of the Korean State Railway, and is the beginning of the Ch'ŏngjinhang Line to Ch'ŏngjin Port.

Kangdok Line

The Kangdŏk Line is an electrified standard-gauge secondary line of the North Korean State Railway running from Namgangdŏk on the P'yŏngra Line to Susŏng on the Hambuk Line.

Musan Line The railway which connects Puryong with Musan in DPRK.

The Musan Line is an electrified standard-gauge secondary trunk line of the Korean State Railway in Musan and Puryŏng counties, North Hamgyŏng Province, North Korea, running from Komusan on the Hambuk Line to Musan, where it connects to the narrow-gauge Paengmu Line. The section from Komusan to Sinch'am is double tracked.

Hoeryong Tangwang Line

The Hoeryŏng T'an'gwang Line is a non-electrified standard-gauge freight-only secondary line of the Korean State Railway in North Korea, running from Hoeryŏng Ch'ŏngnyŏn on the Hambuk Line to Yusŏn.

Hongui Line railway line

The Hongŭi Line is an electrified standard-gauge secondary line of the North Korean State Railway running from Hongŭi on the Hambuk Line to Tumangang, which is the border station between North Korea and Russia. From Tumangang the line continues across the border to Khasan, Russia. The line from Tumangang to Rajin is double-tracked, including the entirety of the Hongŭi Line; during the recent renovation a 32 km section of dual Standard/Russian gauge was installed between Tumangang and Rajin stations. The entirety of the North Korean section of the line is located in Sŏnbong county of Rasŏn Special City.

Pyongra Line railway line in North Korea

The P'yŏngra Line is an electrified standard-gauge trunk line of the Korean State Railway in North Korea, running from P'yŏngyang to Rajin, where it connects with the Hambuk Line. It is North Korea's main northeast–southwest rail line.

Tumangang station railway station in North Korea

Tumangang station is a railway station in Tumangang-rodongjagu, Sŏnbong, Rasŏn Special City, North Korea, on the Hongŭi Line of the Korean State Railway.

Hongŭi station is a railway station in Hongŭi-ri, Sŏnbong county, Rasŏn Special City, North Korea; it is the junction point of the Hongŭi and Hambuk lines of the Korean State Railway.

Musu station is a railway station in Musu-rodongjagu, Puryŏng, North Hamgyŏng province, North Korea, on the Musan Line of the Korean State Railway.

Chuch'o station is a railway station in Chucho'o-rodongjagu, Musan county, North Hamgyŏng province, North Korea, on the Musan Line of the Korean State Railway.

Musan station is a railway station in Musan-ŭp, Musan county, North Hamgyŏng province, North Korea, at the terminus of the Musan Line of the Korean State Railway. The narrow-gauge Paengmu Line from Paegam on the Paektusan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line also terminates here.

Hoeryong Chongnyon station

Hoeryŏng Ch'ŏngnyŏn station is a railway station in Hoeryŏng-si, North Hamgyŏng, North Korea, on the Hambuk Line of the Korean State Railway. It is also the starting point of the 10.6-km-long freight-only Hoeryŏng Colliery Line to Yusŏn-dong, Hoeryŏng-si.

Namyang station

Namyang station is a railway station in Namyang-rodongjagu, Onsŏng county, North Hamgyŏng, North Korea, on the Hambuk Line of the Korean State Railway, and there is a bridge across the Tumen River, giving a connection to the Chinese railway network at Tumen, China via the Namyang Border Line.

Sambong station

Sambong station is a railway station in Sambong-rodongjagu, Onsŏng County, North Hamgyŏng, North Korea, on the Hambuk Line of the Korean State Railway.

Namyanggukkyong Line

The Namyanggukkyŏng Line, or Namyang Border Line, is a 0.8 km (0.50 mi) long railway line of the Korean State Railway connecting Namyang on the Hambuk Line with Kukkyŏng at the DPRK–China border, continuing on to Tumen, China, 3.3 km (2.1 mi) from Namyang. At Tumen it connects with China Railway's Changtu Railway, Tujia Railway, and Tuhun Railway. The line is electrified between Namyang and Kukkyong.

The Chaokai Railway is a 58.4 km (36.3 mi) freight-only railway line of the China Railway in Jilin Province, connecting Chaoyangchuan on the Changtu Railway with Kaishantun. The line formerly crossed the Tumen River to reach Sambong in modern-day North Korea, but the bridge has since had the tracks removed, and is in use as a road crossing.

The North Chosen Line – specifically, the North Chosen West Line and the North Chosen East Line – was a railway line of the South Manchuria Railway in Japanese-occupied Korea from 1933 to 1945. Following Japan's defeat in the Pacific War and the subsequent partition of Korea, the line, being located entirely in the North, was taken over by the Korean State Railway as part of the Hambuk Line.

References

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