Hangul orthography

Last updated
Hangul orthography
Hangul
한글 맞춤법
Hanja
한글 맞춤法
Revised Romanization Hangeul matchumbeop
McCune–Reischauer Han'gŭl match'umpŏp

한글맞춤법 (Hangeul matchumbeop) refers to the overall rules of writing the Korean language with Hangul. The current orthography was issued and established by Korean Ministry of Culture in 1998. The first of it is Hunminjungeum(훈민정음). In everyday conversation, 한글 맞춤법 is referred to as 맞춤법.

Korean orthography rule (한글 맞춤법) consists of six chapters, along with appendix.


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