Hans Conried

Last updated
Hans Conried
Hans Conreid 1977.JPG
Conried in The Tony Randall Show , 1977
Born
Hans Georg Conried, Jr.

(1917-04-15)April 15, 1917
DiedJanuary 5, 1982(1982-01-05) (aged 64)
Alma mater Columbia University
OccupationActor, voice actor
Years active1937–1982
Spouse(s)
Margaret Grant
(m. 1942;his death 1982)
Children4 [1]

Hans Georg Conried, Jr. (April 15, 1917 January 5, 1982) was an American actor and voice actor, who was very active in voice-over roles and known for providing the voices of Walt Disney's Mr. George Darling, and Captain Hook in Peter Pan (1953), for playing the title role in The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T , Dr. Miller on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show , Professor Kropotkin on the radio and film versions of My Friend Irma , his work as Uncle Tonoose on Danny Thomas's sitcom Make Room for Daddy , and multiple roles on I Love Lucy .

The Walt Disney Company American mass media corporation

The Walt Disney Company, commonly known as Walt Disney or simply Disney, is an American diversified multinational mass media and entertainment conglomerate headquartered at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California. It is the world's oldest media conglomerate, and the largest in terms of revenue, ahead of NBCUniversal and WarnerMedia.

Captain Hook fictional human

Captain James Hook is a fictional character, the main antagonist of J. M. Barrie's play Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up and its various adaptations, in which he is Peter Pan's archenemy. The character is a pirate captain of the brig Jolly Roger. His two principal fears are the sight of his own blood and the crocodile who pursues him after eating the hand cut off by Pan. An iron hook replaced his severed hand, which gave the pirate his name.

<i>Peter Pan</i> (1953 film) 1953 American animated fantasy-adventure film

Peter Pan is a 1953 American animated fantasy adventure film produced by Walt Disney and based on the play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up by J. M. Barrie. It is the 14th Disney animated feature film and was originally released on February 5, 1953, by RKO Radio Pictures. Peter Pan is the final Disney animated feature released through RKO before Walt Disney's founding of his own distribution company, Buena Vista Distribution, later in 1953 after the film was released. Peter Pan is also the final Disney film in which all nine members of Disney's Nine Old Men worked together as directing animators. It is also the second Disney animated film starring Kathryn Beaumont, Heather Angel, and Bill Thompson after their roles in the animated feature Alice in Wonderland.

Contents

Biography

Early years

Conried was born on April 15, 1917 in Baltimore, Maryland to parents Edith Beryl (née Gildersleeve) and Hans Georg Conried, Sr. His Connecticut-born mother was a descendant of Pilgrims, and his father was a Jewish immigrant from Vienna, Austria. [2] He was raised in Baltimore and in New York City.

Baltimore Largest city in Maryland

Baltimore is the largest city in the state of Maryland within the United States. Baltimore was established by the Constitution of Maryland as an independent city in 1729. With a population of 611,648 in 2017, Baltimore is the largest such independent city in the United States. As of 2017, the population of the Baltimore metropolitan area was estimated to be just under 2.808 million, making it the 20th largest metropolitan area in the country. Baltimore is located about 40 miles (60 km) northeast of Washington, D.C., making it a principal city in the Washington-Baltimore combined statistical area (CSA), the fourth-largest CSA in the nation, with a calculated 2017 population of 9,764,315.

Maryland State of the United States of America

Maryland is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware to its east. The state's largest city is Baltimore, and its capital is Annapolis. Among its occasional nicknames are Old Line State, the Free State, and the Chesapeake Bay State. It is named after the English queen Henrietta Maria, known in England as Queen Mary.

Connecticut state of the United States of America

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the Tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

He studied acting at Columbia University and went on to play major classical roles onstage. Conried worked in radio before working in movies in 1939. During World War II, he enlisted in the United States Army in September 1944. [3]

Columbia University Private Ivy League research university in New York City

Columbia University is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Established in 1754, Columbia is the oldest institution of higher education in New York and the fifth-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. It is one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence, seven of which belong to the Ivy League. It has been ranked by numerous major education publications as among the top ten universities in the world.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

United States Army Land warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Army (USA) is the land warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces. It is one of the seven uniformed services of the United States, and is designated as the Army of the United States in the United States Constitution. As the oldest and most senior branch of the U.S. military in order of precedence, the modern U.S. Army has its roots in the Continental Army, which was formed to fight the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783)—before the United States of America was established as a country. After the Revolutionary War, the Congress of the Confederation created the United States Army on 3 June 1784 to replace the disbanded Continental Army. The United States Army considers itself descended from the Continental Army, and dates its institutional inception from the origin of that armed force in 1775.

Conried trained at Fort Knox as a tank crewman until the army decided he was too tall. He became a heavy mortar crewman then was sent to the Philippines as an engineer labourer until fellow actor Jack Kruschen obtained his release for service with the Armed Forces Radio Service. [4]

Fort Knox US Army post in Kentucky, United States

Fort Knox is a United States Army post in Kentucky, south of Louisville and north of Elizabethtown. It is also adjacent to the United States Bullion Depository, which is used to house a large portion of the United States' official gold reserves. The 109,000 acre base covers parts of Bullitt, Hardin, and Meade counties. It currently holds the Army Human Resources Center of Excellence to include the Army Human Resources Command. It is named in honor of Henry Knox, Chief of Artillery in the American Revolutionary War and first United States Secretary of War.

Jack Kruschen Canadian actor

Jacob "Jack" Kruschen was a Canadian character actor who worked primarily in American film, television and radio. Kruschen was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Dr. Dreyfuss in the 1960 comedy-drama The Apartment.

Radio career and other voice work

One of Conried's early radio appearances came in 1937, when he appeared in a supporting role in a broadcast of The Taming of the Shrew on KECA in Los Angeles, California. [5] Four years later, a newspaper reported about his role on Hedda Hopper's Hollywood: "But at the mike he's equally convincing as old men, drunks, dialeticians, or Shakesperean tragedians. Miss Hopper favors him for her dramatizations when the script will allow him, as she puts it, 'to have his head.'" [6]

<i>The Taming of the Shrew</i> play by Shakespeare

The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written between 1590 and 1592.

KABC is a commercial AM radio station licensed to Los Angeles, California. It serves as a West Coast flagship station for the Cumulus Media company. A pioneer of the talk radio format, the station went "all-talk" in September 1960, the second radio station to do so, a few months after KMOX in St. Louis. Despite different owners, KABC, KSPN and KABC-TV, all maintain an informal partnership.

Conried appeared regularly on radio during the 1940s and 1950s. He was in the regular cast of Orson Welles's Ceiling Unlimited , for which he wrote the December 14, 1942, episode, "War Workers". [7] On CBS's The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show he played a psychiatrist whom George regularly consulted for help in dealing with the ditzy Gracie.

<i>Ceiling Unlimited</i>

Ceiling Unlimited (1942–1944) is a CBS radio series created by Orson Welles and sponsored by the Lockheed-Vega Corporation. The program was conceived to glorify the aviation industry and dramatize its role in World War II.

CBS is an American English language commercial broadcast television and radio network that is a flagship property of CBS Corporation. The company is headquartered at the CBS Building in New York City with major production facilities and operations in New York City and Los Angeles.

<i>The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show</i> American television series

The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, sometimes called The Burns and Allen Show, is a half-hour television series broadcast from 1950 to 1958 on CBS. It stars George Burns and Gracie Allen, one of the most enduring acts in entertainment history. Burns and Allen were headliners in vaudeville in the 1920s, and radio stars in the 1930s and 1940s. Their situation comedy TV series received Emmy Award nominations throughout its eight-year run.

Conried made his Broadway debut in Can-Can [8] and was credited in six films (among them The Twonky and The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T ), all in 1953. Other Broadway productions include 70, Girls, 70 and Irene . He can be clearly heard on the original cast recordings of Cole Porter's "Can-Can" and Kander & Ebb's "70, Girls, 70" where, among other songs, Conried performs a sensational fast-paced patter song called "The Caper."

Conried's inimitable growl and impeccable diction were well suited to the roles he played, whether portraying the dim Professor Kropotkin in the radio show My Friend Irma or portraying comic villains and mock-sinister or cranky types, such as Walt Disney's Mr. Darling, and Captain Hook in Peter Pan (1953), and The Grinch/Narrator from Dr. Seuss' Halloween is Grinch Night . According to the DVD commentary of Futurama , he was the inspiration for the voice created for that series' "Robot Devil".

Conried was a cast member of other Dr. Seuss specials, and The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show , voicing the character of Snidely Whiplash in the Dudley Do-Right shorts, a creation of Jay Ward and Bill Scott, as well as Wally Walrus on The Woody Woodpecker Show , Uncle Waldo P. Wigglesworth on Hoppity Hooper , and Dr. Dred on Drak Pack . He also performed as the "slave in the mirror" character, hosting several memorable episodes of Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color .

TV appearances

Conried as the grumpy Uncle Tonoose, a recurring role he played on Make Room for Daddy . Hans Conried Uncle Tonoose Danny Thomas Show 1959.JPG
Conried as the grumpy Uncle Tonoose, a recurring role he played on Make Room for Daddy .

Besides hosting Fractured Flickers , Conried was a regular panelist on CBS's pantomime program, Stump the Stars and a semi-regular guest on the Ernie Kovacs-hosted game show Take a Good Look . He was a regular guest on Jack Paar's Tonight Show on NBC from 1959 to 1962. Conried joined the cast of The Tony Randall Show during the 1977-78 season.

Guest appearances included I Love Lucy (as the English tutor Percy Livermore) Davy Crockett , The Californians , Meet McGraw , Hey, Jeannie! , The Ray Milland Show , The DuPont Show with June Allyson , The Real McCoys , The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis , Mister Ed , The Islanders , Ben Casey , Dr. Kildare , Lost in Space , Daniel Boone , The Beverly Hillbillies , The Lucy Show , Gilligan's Island , The Monkees , Have Gun – Will Travel , Love, American Style , Here's Lucy , Kolchak , Alice , Laverne & Shirley , The Love Boat , Hogan's Heroes , Match Game , Maverick , The Donna Reed Show, What's It For, Fantasy Island and Quark .

From 1955-64, Conried made twenty-one guest appearances as Danny Thomas's Lebanese "Uncle Tonoose" in Make Room for Daddy on ABC and then CBS. He was featured in the 1958 episode "What Makes Opera Grand?" on the anthology series Omnibus . The episode, an analysis by Leonard Bernstein showing the powerful effect of music in opera, featured Conried as Marcello in a spoken dramatization of Act III of Puccini's La Bohème . The program demonstrated the effect of the music in La Bohème by having actors speak portions of the libretto in English, followed by opera singers singing the same lines in the original Italian. [ citation needed ]

Personal life and death

He married Margaret Grant on January 29, 1942; the couple had four children. [1] Conried had a history of heart problems and suffered a stroke in 1974 and a mild heart attack in 1979. [9] He managed to remain active until his death on January 5, 1982, one day after suffering a massive heart attack and three weeks short of his 40th wedding anniversary. His remains were donated to medical science.

Filmography

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References

  1. 1 2 "Hans Conried, 66". The New York Times . January 6, 1982. Retrieved 2009-01-21. Hans Conried, a versatile character actor and comedian who entertained audiences on stage, radio and television and in films for more than 40 years, died of a heart attack yesterday in a hospital in Burbank, Calif. A resident of Hollywood, he was 66 years old. Mr. Conried, a tall, ...
  2. Gargiulo, Suzanne; Leonard Maltin (2002). Hans Conried: a biography. McFarland. pp. 9–10. ISBN   0-7864-1338-7.
  3. National Archives and Records Administration. U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, US: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005.
  4. p. 46 Gargiulo, Suzanne Hans Conried: A Biography; With a Filmography and a Listing of Radio, Television, Stage and Voice Work McFarland, 22 Aug. 2002
  5. "Toscanini Will Conduct Vienna Orchestra on Air". The San Bernardino County Sun. July 26, 1937. p. 11. Retrieved May 2, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  6. "Shirley Temple on Air Tonight". Belvidere Daily Republican. January 27, 1941. p. 5. Retrieved May 3, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  7. Welles, Orson, and Peter Bogdanovich, edited by Jonathan Rosenbaum, This is Orson Welles. New York: HarperCollins Publishers 1992 ISBN   0-06-016616-9 page 375
  8. "Delmar to return to radio". Billboard. 1953-03-07. Retrieved 2015-03-26.
  9. "Hans Conried, the versatile comedian who delighted radio, TV,..." United Press International . January 6, 1982. Retrieved January 9, 2019.
  10. "YouTube".