Hapu Party

Last updated

The Hapu Party was a Māori political party in New Zealand formed in August 2008. [1] The party's leader was Northland iwi leader David Rankin. [1]

Māori people Indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand

The Māori are the indigenous Polynesian people of New Zealand. Māori originated with settlers from eastern Polynesia, who arrived in New Zealand in several waves of canoe voyages some time between 1250 and 1300. Over several centuries in isolation, the Polynesian settlers developed a unique culture, with their own language, a rich mythology, and distinctive crafts and performing arts. Early Māori formed tribal groups based on eastern Polynesian social customs and organisation. Horticulture flourished using plants they introduced; later, a prominent warrior culture emerged.

A political party is an organized group of people, often with common views, who come together to contest elections and hold power in the government. The party agrees on some proposed policies and programmes, with a view to promoting the collective good or furthering their supporters' interests.

New Zealand Country in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Contents

Policies and actions

The Hapu Party believed that because of poorer Māori health outcomes, and therefore reduced life expectancy, Māori should be eligible for the pension at age 56. It planned to introduce a flat rate 18% personal tax and GST rate. Finally it sought to introduce the allocation of Treaty of Waitangi settlement monies to hapū and marae, and to allow treaty claims to be made over private land. [2]

Treaty of Waitangi treaty signed on 6 February 1840 by representatives of the British Crown and various Māori chiefs from the North Island of New Zealand

The Treaty of Waitangi is a treaty first signed on 6 February 1840 by representatives of the British Crown and Māori chiefs (rangatira) from the North Island of New Zealand. It is a document of central importance to the history and political constitution of the state of New Zealand, and has been highly significant in framing the political relations between New Zealand's government and the Māori population.

In Māoridom and New Zealand, a hapū functions as "the basic political unit within Māori society".

Marae cleared ceremonial meeting place in some Polynesian societies

A marae, malaʻe, meʻae, and malae is a communal or sacred place that serves religious and social purposes in Polynesian societies. In all these languages, the term also means "cleared, free of weeds, trees, etc". It generally consists of an area of cleared land roughly rectangular, bordered with stones or wooden posts perhaps with terraces which were traditionally used for ceremonial purposes; and in some cases, a central stone ahu or a'u. In the Rapa Nui culture of Easter Island ahu has become a synonym for the whole marae complex).

The Hapu party sought to stand candidates in all seven Māori electorates for the 2008 election. [1] It ran only a single candidate in 2008, receiving only 202 votes. [3] It did not run any candidates in the 2011 election.

Māori electorates

In New Zealand politics, Māori electorates, colloquially known as the Māori seats, are a special category of electorate that gives reserved positions to representatives of Māori in the New Zealand Parliament. Every area in New Zealand is covered by both a general and a Māori electorate; there are currently seven Māori electorates. Since 1967 candidates in Māori electorates have not needed to be Māori themselves, but to register as a voter in the Māori electorates people need to declare they are of Māori descent.

Leadership

The party's leader David Rankin, Matarahurahu hapū leader, became involved in a number of controversies including attempting to ban Māori Party MP Hone Harawira and his mother Titewhai Harawira from Waitangi Day commemorations in 2007. [4] Later he called for Harawira's resignation following Harawira's allegations of racism towards the Australian prime minister. [5] Rankin became involved in the question of authenticity surrounding the auction of a piece of the famous Kororareka flagpole cut down in Russel in 1844 as an act of defiance against British authority, by his great great uncle Hone Heke. [6]

Māori Party New Zealand political party promoting indigenous rights

The Māori Party is an indigenous rights-based political party in New Zealand, formed on 7 July 2004. Tariana Turia founded the party after resigning from the Labour Party, where she had been a minister in the Fifth Labour Government. She and Pita Sharples, a high-profile academic, became co-leaders. Since the 2008 election, the party supported a National Party-led government, and Turia and Sharples became ministers outside cabinet.

Hone Harawira New Zealand politician

Hone Pani Tamati Waka Nene Harawira is a New Zealand Māori activist and former parliamentarian. He was elected to the New Zealand Parliament for the Māori electorate of Te Tai Tokerau in the 2005 general election as the Māori Party candidate. His resignation caused the Te Tai Tokerau by-election, held on 25 June 2011, which he won with a majority of 1117. As Leader of the Mana Movement and Member of Parliament for Te Tai Tokerau, he sat on the front bench in the New Zealand House of Representatives until losing the seat in the 2014 general election.

Titewhai Harawira

Titewhai Harawira is a Māori activist. She is affiliated with the Ngāti Hau and Ngāti Hine hapū of Ngāpuhi and Ngāti Wai.

See also

Related Research Articles

Iwi are the largest social units in Aotearoa Māori society. The Māori-language word iwi means "people" or "nation", and is often translated as "tribe", or "a confederation of tribes". The word is both singular and plural in Māori.

Waitangi Day National day of New Zealand

Waitangi Day is the national day of New Zealand, and commemorates the signing, on 6 February 1840, of the Treaty of Waitangi. Ceremonies take place at Waitangi, Northland to commemorate the signing of the treaty, which is regarded as New Zealand's founding document. The day is observed annually and is designated a public holiday, unless 6 February falls on a Saturday or Sunday, when the Monday that immediately follows becomes the public holiday.

Tariana Turia New Zealand politician

Dame Tariana Turia is a New Zealand politician. She gained considerable prominence during the foreshore and seabed controversy, and eventually broke with her party as a result. She resigned from parliament, and successfully contested a by-election in her former electorate as a candidate of the newly formed Māori Party. She retired from Parliament in 2014.

Ngāpuhi

Ngāpuhi is a Māori iwi located in the Northland region of New Zealand, and centred in the Hokianga, the Bay of Islands, and Whangarei.

Māori politics

Māori politics is the politics of the Māori people, who were the original inhabitants of New Zealand and who are now the country's largest minority. Modern Māori politics can be seen as a subset of New Zealand politics in general, but has a number of distinguishing features.

Tame Iti New Zealand politician and artist

Tame Wairere Iti is a Tūhoe Māori activist in New Zealand. He grew up in the Urewera area, and in the late 1960s and 1970s he was involved in protests against the Vietnam War and apartheid in South Africa, and in many Māori protest actions. His ability to court controversy and his full tā moko make him well-recognised.

Treaty of Waitangi claims and settlements have been a significant feature of New Zealand race relations and politics since 1975. Since the Treaty of Waitangi Act 1975, New Zealand governments have increasingly provided formal legal and political opportunity for Māori to seek redress for breaches by the Crown of the guarantees set out in the Treaty of Waitangi. While it has resulted in putting to rest a number of significant longstanding grievances, the process has been subject to criticisms from a number of angles, from those who believe that the redress is insufficient to compensate for Māori losses, to those who see no value in revisiting painful and contentious historical issues. The settlements are typically seen as part of a broader Māori Renaissance.

The New Zealand Oath of Allegiance is defined by the Oaths and Declarations Act 1957. All Oaths can be taken in either Māori or English form. It is possible to take an affirmation, which has the same legal effect as an Oath.

Ngā Tamatoa was a Māori activist group that operated throughout the 1970s to promote Māori rights, fight racial discrimination, and confront injustices perpetrated by the New Zealand Government, particularly violations of the Treaty of Waitangi.

The Māori renaissance is the revival in fortunes of the Māori of New Zealand beginning in the latter half of the twentieth century. During this period, the perception of Māori went from being that of a "dying race" to being politically, culturally and artistically ascendant.

Paul Moon New Zealand historian

Paul Moon is a New Zealand historian and a professor at the Auckland University of Technology. He is a prolific writer of New Zealand history and biography, specialising in Māori history, the Treaty of Waitangi and the early period of Crown rule.

Flagstaff Hill (New Zealand) hill in New Zealand

Flagstaff Hill overlooks the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. Directly north of the small historical village of Russell, the flagstaff on the hill played a significant role in early relations between the local Māori of the Ngāpuhi iwi and early British colonials.

Te Tai Tokerau

Te Tai Tokerau is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate that was created out of the Northern Maori electorate ahead of the first Mixed Member Proportional (MMP) election in 1996. It was first held by Tau Henare representing New Zealand First for one term, and then Dover Samuels of the Labour Party for two terms. From 2005 to 2014, it was held by MP Hone Harawira. Initially a member of the Māori Party, Harawira resigned from both the party and then Parliament, causing the 2011 by-election. He was returned under the Mana Party banner in July 2011 and confirmed at the November 2011 general election. In the 2014 election, he was beaten by Labour's Kelvin Davis, ending the representation of the Mana Party in Parliament.

Kelvin Davis (politician) New Zealand politician

Kelvin Glen Davis is a New Zealand politician and a member of the House of Representatives who has served as Deputy Leader of the Labour Party since 1 August 2017.

Annette Sykes New Zealand politician

Annette Te Imaima Sykes is a Rotorua activist and lawyer who fights for the rights of Māori tribes to be self-governing. She was ranked third on the joint Internet Mana list for the New Zealand general election, 2014.

The Mana Movement is a New Zealand political party led by Hone Harawira which was formed in April 2011, following his resignation from the Māori Party. Harawira won the by-election in Te Tai Tokerau of 25 June 2011 for the Mana Party, and retained the seat during the 2011 general election but lost it in 2014 and 2017 to Labour Party candidate, Kelvin Davis.

2011 Te Tai Tokerau by-election New Zealand by-election

The 2011 Te Tai Tokerau by-election was a by-election in the New Zealand electorate of Te Tai Tokerau that was caused by Hone Harawira's resignation from the seat. He chose to re-contest it with the Mana Party in order to seek a new mandate for his views. After generating several days of media interest and criticism Harawira announced on 4 May 2011 that he was delaying his resignation in order to consult his supporters in his electorate. On 11 May 2011 Harawira wrote to the Speaker of the House to resign from Parliament, with effect from 20 May 2011. On 12 May 2011 the Prime Minister John Key announced that the by-election would be held on 25 June.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "New Maori Party to be launched". 2008-08-14. Retrieved 2008-08-16.
  2. "Hapu Party issues shock Treaty policy". Scoop Media. 2008-09-30. Retrieved 2008-10-08.
  3. "Election Results -- Te Tai Tokerau". Chief Electoral Office. 2008-11-08. Archived from the original on 2009-05-23. Retrieved 2008-11-14.
  4. "Hapu leader warns Harawiras to stay away from Waitangi". The New Zealand Herald . NZPA. 1 February 2007. Retrieved 2 October 2011.
  5. "Backlash against Harawira outburst". Television New Zealand . 10 July 2007. Retrieved 2 October 2011.
  6. Tahana, Yvonne (30 March 2009). "Flagpole auction raises history question". The New Zealand Herald . Retrieved 2 October 2011.