Harold Poynton

Last updated

Harry Poynton
Harold Poynton - Wakefield Trinity.jpeg
Personal information
Full nameHarold Poynton
Born(1936-03-01)1 March 1936
Wakefield, England
Died4 June 2018(2018-06-04) (aged 82)
Wakefield, England
Playing information
Height5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Weight11 st 5 lb (72 kg)
Position Stand-off, Scrum-half
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1957–69 Wakefield Trinity 31962160218
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1960 Yorkshire 1
1962 Great Britain 30000
As of 12 February 2009
Source: [1]

Harold Poynton (1 March 1936 – 4 June 2018) [2] also known by the nicknames "Fishcake", "Poynton the Pippin", and "Prince of Bamboozlers", [3] was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Yorkshire, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity (Heritage № 643) (captain), as a stand-off, or scrum-half, i.e. number 6, or 7. [1]

Contents

Background

Harold Poynton was born in Lupset, Wakefield, West Riding of Yorkshire, England. He was a pupil at St Michael's School, Flanshaw, Wakefield, and then Snapethorpe School, Lupset, Wakefield, and he would watch Wakefield Trinity play over-the-wall without paying. He joined the British Army at age 18, whilst stationed in Germany, he played association football, and for the first time he played rugby football, and he left the army aged 21, and in 1957 he trialled for Wakefield Trinity's A-Team. He worked as a warehouseman c.1963, and he later worked as a salesman for a food company. His nickname of "fishcake" originated from his habitual fish and chip shop order following training sessions with Wakefield Trinity, and was given to him by Derek Turner. He and his wife Kath ran newsagent's shops for over 30 years, initially on Hesley Road, Kettlethorpe, Wakefield, and then on Dewsbury Road (opposite Ashleigh Avenue), Lupset, Wakefield. [4] On 15 July 2007 Harold Poynton had the beer Poynton's Pride named after him. [5] Harold Poynton's funeral service took place at Wakefield Cathedral at 11:00am on 21 June 2018, followed by cremation at Wakefield Crematorium at 1:00pm, and a reception at Waterton House. [6]

Playing career

International honours

Harold Poynton played stand-off, alongside Wakefield Trinity teammate; left-prop; Jack Wilkinson, and against teammates left-centre; Neil Fox, and loose forward; Derek Turner, in Rest of the League's 16–21 defeat by Great Britain in pre-1960 Rugby League World Cup warm-up match, in aid of the George VI's Jubilee Trust, at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Monday 12 September 1960, he played stand-off in Great Britain's 17–10 victory over Australia in the second 1962 Great Britain Lions tour Ashes Test Match at Lang Park, Brisbane on Saturday 30 June 1962, and the 17–18 defeat by Australia in the third 1962 Great Britain Lions tour Ashes Test Match at Sydney Cricket Ground on Saturday 14 July 1962, and played scrum-half in the 8–27 defeat by New Zealand in the second Test Match at Carlaw Park, Auckland on Saturday 11 August 1962. [1]

In addition to the above Test Matches, Harold Poynton also played in the following 1962 Great Britain Lions tour matches; the 24–10 victory over Western New South Wales at Bathurst, New South Wales on Sunday 27 May 1962, the 18–23 defeat by Newcastle at Newcastle, New South Wales on Monday 4 June 1962, the 36–12 victory over Toowoomba at Toowoomba on Sunday 17 June 1962, the 55–8 victory over Central Queensland at Rockhampton on Wednesday 20 June 1962, the 33–31 victory over Far North Queensland at Cairns on Saturday 23 June 1962, the 20–5 victory over New South Wales at Sydney Cricket Ground on Saturday 7 July 1962, the 10–18 defeat by Northern New South Wales at Tamworth, New South Wales on Sunday 8 July 1962, the 81–14 victory over Bay of Plenty at Rotorua on Tuesday 7 August 1962, the 13–46 defeat by Auckland at Auckland on Monday 13 August 1962, the 49–30 victory over South Africa at Pretoria on Thursday 23 August 1962, the 39–33 victory over South Africa at Durban on Saturday 25 August 1962, and the 45–23 victory over South Africa at Johannesburg on Friday 31 August 1962.

County honours

Harold Poynton won a cap for Yorkshire while at Wakefield Trinity, he played stand-off, alongside Wakefield Trinity teammates; right wing; Fred Smith, left-centre; Neil Fox, left-prop; Jack Wilkinson, and right-second-row; Derek Turner in the defeat by Cumberland, at Recreation Ground, Whitehaven on Wednesday 14 September 1960.

Championship Final appearances

Harold Poynton played stand-off, and was captain, and scored a try in Wakefield Trinity's 21–9 victory over St. Helens in the Championship Final replay during the 1966–67 season at Station Road, Swinton on Wednesday 10 May 1967, played stand-off, and was captain, and scored a goal the 17–10 victory over Hull Kingston Rovers in the Championship Final during the 1967–68 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 4 May 1968. [7]

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Harold Poynton was injured in Wakefield Trinity's 11–2 victory over Featherstone Rovers in the Challenge Cup semi-final at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Saturday 9 April 1960, and so he missed the 38–5 victory over Hull F.C. in the 1959–60 Challenge Cup Final, but he played stand-off in Wakefield Trinity's 12–6 victory over Huddersfield in the 1961–62 Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 12 May 1962, in front of a crowd of 81,263, played stand-off, scored a try, played stand-off, and was man of the match winning the Lance Todd Trophy in the 25–10 victory over Wigan in the 1962–63 Challenge Cup Final at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 11 May 1963, in front of a crowd of 84,492, and played stand-off, and was captain in the 10–11 defeat by Leeds in the 1967–68 Challenge Cup Final (the "Watersplash" final) at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 11 May 1968, in front of a crowd of 87,100. [7]

County Cup Final appearances

Harold Poynton played stand-off in Wakefield Trinity's 16–10 victory over Huddersfield in the 1960–61 Yorkshire Cup Final during the 1960–61 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 29 October 1960, [7] played stand-off in the 19–9 victory over Leeds in the 1961–62 Yorkshire Cup Final at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Saturday 11 November 1961, and played stand-off in the 18–2 victory over Leeds in the 1964–65 Yorkshire Cup Final at Fartown, Huddersfield on Saturday 31 October 1964.

Club career

Geoffrey Oakes, Reg Parker, and Harold Poynton made their début for Wakefield Trinity in the 17–12 victory over St. Helens at Belle Vue, Wakefield on Saturday 1 February 1958, in early 1963 he was the subject of a £8,000 transfer bid from St. Helens, [3] (based on inflation, this would be equivalent to £168,753in 2019) (based on increases in average earnings, this would be approximately equivalent to £322,100.00 in 2017), [8] and he played his last match for Wakefield Trinity against Huddersfield at Belle Vue, Wakefield on Saturday 13 September 1969, after which he retired due to a recurring knee injury.

Testimonial match

Harold Poynton's Testimonial match for Wakefield Trinity was the 10–5 victory over the then league-leaders Leeds, at Belle Vue, Wakefield on Monday 15 April 1968.

Family

Harold Poynton's married Kathleen (née Stanley) in 1965 in Wakefield. They had two children; David (born 1966) and Rachel (born 1971). [9]

Related Research Articles

Frank Dyson

Frank Dyson, also known by the nickname of "Spanky", was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Yorkshire, and at club level for Huddersfield and Oldham, as a prolific left-footed goal-kicking fullback, i.e. number 1, and he coached at club level for Oldham.

Wakefield Trinity English professional rugby league football club

Wakefield Trinity is a professional rugby league club in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England, that plays in the Super League. One of the original twenty-two clubs that formed the Northern Rugby Football Union in 1895, between 1999 and 2016 the club was known as Wakefield Trinity Wildcats. The club has played at Belle Vue Stadium in Wakefield since 1895 and has rivalries with Castleford Tigers and Featherstone Rovers. Wakefield have won two premierships in their history when they went back to back in 1967 and 1968. As of 2021, it has been 53 years since Wakefield last won the league.

Dave Valentine former GB international rugby league & Scotland international rugby union footballer

David Donald Valentine was a Scottish representative rugby union and World Cup winning rugby league footballer, a dual-code rugby international who played in the 1940s and 1950s, and coached in the 1960s.

Ken Traill English RL coach and former GB & England international rugby league footballer

Kenneth Traill was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s, and coached in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Hunslet, Bradford Northern, Halifax and Wakefield Trinity, as a loose forward, and coached at club level for Wakefield Trinity.

Neil Fox MBE is an English former professional rugby league footballer and player-coach who played in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, and coached in the 1970s and 1980s.

Alan Leslie Skene was a South African dual-code international rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for South Africa, and at provincial level for Western Province, as a centre, i.e. number 12 or 13, and representative level rugby league (RL) for South Africa and Rugby League XIII, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity, and South Sydney Rabbitohs, as a centre, or stand-off, i.e. number 3 or 4, or 6.

Jack Wilkinson was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1960s. A Halifax and Wakefield Trinity Hall of Fame inductee, he was a Great Britain and England international forward. Wilkinson also represented Yorkshire, and ended his career as captain-coach of Bradford Northern.

Derek Turner former English RL coach and GB & England international rugby league footballer

Derek Turner, also known by the nickname of "Rocky", was an English World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England, Yorkshire and Great Britain & France, and at club level for Hull Kingston Rovers, Oldham and Wakefield Trinity (captain), with whom he won three Challenge Cup Finals, as a second-row, i.e. number 11 or 12, or more usually loose forward, i.e. number 13, and coached at club level for Castleford, Leeds and Wakefield Trinity.

Bill Horton (rugby league) GB & England international rugby league footballer

William Horton was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s and 1930s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity (captain), as a second-row, or loose forward, i.e. number 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums.

Brian Briggs GB & England international rugby league footballer

Brian Briggs was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Stanley Rangers, York, Huddersfield, St. Helens and Wakefield Trinity, as a second-row, i.e. number 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums.

Geoffrey "Geoff" Oakes is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at club level for Wakefield Trinity and Warrington as a hooker, i.e. number 9, during the era of contested scrums.

Fred "Freddy" Smith was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for Yorkshire, and at club level for Leeds and Wakefield Trinity, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5.

Keith Holliday was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Yorkshire (captain), and at club level for Eastmoor ARLFC, Wakefield Trinity (captain), and Bramley, as a centre, stand-off, or scrum-half, i.e. number 3 or 4, 6, or 7, and coached at club level for Bramley.

Gerald "Gerry" V. Round was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Hebden Bridge ARLFC, and Wakefield Trinity, as a fullback, i.e. number 1.

John Holmes was an English World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played as a centre, stand-off and second-row forward in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s.

Herbert Goodfellow England international rugby league footballer

Herbert Goodfellow, also known by the nickname of "Goody", was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity (captain), Batley, Castleford and Oldham, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7.

Thomas "Tommy" Smales was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, and coached in the 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Castleford, Huddersfield (captain), Bradford Northern, North Sydney Bears and Wakefield Trinity as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7, and coached at club level for Castleford and Featherstone Rovers.

William Martin Banks was a Welsh rugby union and World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Maesteg RFC, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 9, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain, Wales, Other Nationalities, British Empire and Combined Nationalities, and at club level for Leeds, Wakefield Trinity, Huddersfield, Whitehaven and Salford, as a stand-off, or scrum-half, i.e. number 6, or 7.

Ted Slevin

Edward "Ted" Slevin was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Lancashire, and at club level for Wigan, Huddersfield and Rochdale Hornets, as a prop, or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums.

Peter Ramsden was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at club level for Huddersfield and York, as a centre, stand-off or loose forward, i.e. number 3 or 4, 6, or 13, during the era of contested scrums.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. "A Tribute to Harold Poynton". Howarth Funeral Service. 21 June 2018.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  3. 1 2 Waring, Eddie (1963). Eddie Waring - Rugby League - Annual 1963–64. Stockport: Boon & Co. ISBN na
  4. "Former Wakefield Trinity and Great Britain star Poynton dies". wakefieldexpress.co.uk. 5 June 2018. Retrieved 5 June 2018.
  5. "One for the road as brewery calls time". wakefieldexpress.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  6. "Obituary at announcements.johnstonpress.co.uk". announcements.johnstonpress.co.uk. 15 June 2018. Retrieved 15 June 2018.
  7. 1 2 3 Hoole, Les (2004). Wakefield Trinity RLFC – FIFTY GREAT GAMES. Breedon Books. ISBN   1-85983-429-9
  8. "Measuring Worth - Relative Value of UK Pounds". Measuring Worth. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  9. "Harold Poynton Obituary". wakefieldtrinity.com. 5 June 2018. Retrieved 5 June 2018.