Harold Wood

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Harold Wood
Terraced housing at Queens Park Road - geograph.org.uk - 1623300.jpg
Terraced housing at Queens Park Road
Greater London UK location map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Harold Wood
Location within Greater London
Population12,650 (Harold Wood ward 2011) [1]
OS grid reference TQ545905
  Charing Cross 16.5 mi (26.6 km)  WSW
London borough
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ROMFORD
Postcode district RM3
Dialling code 01708
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
UK Parliament
London Assembly
List of places
UK
England
London
51°35′31″N0°13′53″E / 51.5920°N 0.2313°E / 51.5920; 0.2313 Coordinates: 51°35′31″N0°13′53″E / 51.5920°N 0.2313°E / 51.5920; 0.2313

Harold Wood is a suburban neighbourhood of Romford in the London Borough of Havering. It is situated 16.5 miles (26.6 km) east-northeast of Charing Cross and near to the Greater London boundary with Essex.

Contents

History

Toponymy

The name Harold Wood was recorded in about 1237, when it was shown as Horalds Wood. It was named after King Harold Godwinson, who was defeated by William the Conqueror in 1066. He held the surrounding manor of Havering-atte-Bower. [2] Some of the original roads are named after Anglo-Saxon kings such as Æthelstan and Alfred the Great.

Local government

Harold Wood formed a ward in the ancient parish of Hornchurch, although the area now around the station was in the North End ward. The eastern and southern boundary of the parish was the River Ingrebourne such that the area around Harold Court was in the parish of Upminster. Although locally situated within Essex the ancient Hornchurch parish formed the independent Liberty of Havering and was outside county administration. Harold Wood ward came under the control of the vestry of Romford chapelry, which also included Collier Row and Noak Hill, [3] however most of the current area of Harold Wood was in the North End ward which remained under Hornchurch parish vestry. In 1836 Romford and Hornchurch became separate civil parishes and were grouped into the Romford Poor Law Union. The area of the union, excluding the town of Romford, became a rural sanitary district in 1875. The special status of the Liberty of Havering was abolished in 1892 and the area was reincorporated into Essex.

Following the Local Government Act 1894, the Romford parish was split with the northern part of the Harold Wood ward becoming a new parish of Noak Hill and the southern part forming part of the Romford Rural parish, both within the Romford Rural District. This split the administration of the area between the Hornchurch, Romford Rural, Noak Hill and Upminster parish councils, and the Romford Rural District Council. In 1900 the Romford Rural parish was recombined with Romford Urban (which consisted of the town of Romford) to form an expanded Romford Urban District. With suburban house building, the population in the area started to rise soon after which prompted changes to the local government system. Hornchurch parish became the Hornchurch Urban District in 1926 and Upminster was added to it in 1934. The area formed part of the London Traffic Area from 1924 and the London Passenger Transport Area from 1933. [4] The whole area was included in the London Borough of Havering in 1965 when it was transferred from Essex to Greater London. [5]

Urban development

The Old Brickworks industrial estate The Old Brickworks - geograph.org.uk - 1623336.jpg
The Old Brickworks industrial estate

Harold Wood Hospital, on Gubbins Lane, closed on 13 December 2006 [6] with all patients moved to Queen's Hospital in nearby Romford. The site vacated by the hospital was earmarked for a 470-home housing development which faced fierce opposition from the local population. Developers have now built over 800 properties on the site. [7]

Education

There are three schools in Harold Wood:

Geography

Harold Wood borders with the following places:

Demography

86% of the population is White British, as of the 2011 census. [8]

Transport

Buses

Harold Wood is served by several London Bus routes:

Railway

Harold Wood railway station is on the Great Eastern Main Line; it is served by six trains an hour each way to London Liverpool Street and to Shenfield, operated by the Elizabeth line.

The nearest tube stations to Harold Wood are Upminster Bridge and Hornchurch, both on the District line.

Roads

The M25 motorway runs along the easterly boundary and the A12 and A127 roads form the north-west and south-west borders respectively.

Related Research Articles

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Romford Town in London, England

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Upminster Town in East London

Upminster is a suburban town in East London, England, within the London Borough of Havering. Located 16.5 miles (26.6 km) east-northeast of Charing Cross, it is one of the district centres identified for development in the London Plan.

London Borough of Havering London borough in United Kingdom

The London Borough of Havering in East London, England, forms part of Outer London. It has a population of 259,552 inhabitants; the principal town is Romford, while other communities are Hornchurch, Upminster, Collier Row and Rainham. The borough is mainly suburban, with large areas of protected open space. Romford is a major retail and night time entertainment centre, and to the south the borough extends into the London Riverside redevelopment area of the Thames Gateway. The name Havering is a reference to the Royal Liberty of Havering which occupied the area for several centuries. The local authority is Havering London Borough Council. It is the easternmost London borough.

Elm Park Human settlement in England

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Harold Hill Human settlement in England

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North Ockendon Human settlement in England

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Upminster Bridge Human settlement in England

Upminster Bridge is a crossing of the River Ingrebourne carrying the A124 road between the suburbs of Hornchurch and Upminster in northeast London, England. The bridge is known to have existed since at least 1375 and the current brick bridge was opened in 1892, replacing a series of wooden bridges. It gave its name to the nearby Upminster Bridge tube station, which opened in 1934, and has also been applied to the neighbourhood around the station in the London Borough of Havering.

Royal Liberty of Havering Medieval jurisdiction in England

Havering, also known as Havering-atte-Bower, was a royal manor and ancient liberty whose area now forms part of, and gives its name to, the London Borough of Havering in Greater London. The manor was in the possession of the Crown from the 11th to the 19th centuries and was the location of Havering Palace from the 13th to the late 17th century. It occupied the same area as the ancient parish of Hornchurch which was divided into the three chapelries of Havering, Hornchurch and Romford.

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Municipal Borough of Romford

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Rainham, London Suburban town on the outskirts of east London, England

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Public transport in the London Borough of Havering, in east London, England, is a mix of National Rail, London Underground, London Overground and Crossrail and London Buses services. Rail services are primarily radial to central London with bus services providing most of the orbital connections. The public transport authority is Transport for London and the local authority is Havering London Borough Council.

References

  1. Census Information Scheme (2012). "2011 Census Ward Population Estimates". Greater London Authority. Retrieved 30 January 2013.
  2. A. D. Mills, ed. (January 2011). A Dictionary of British Place Names. Oxford Reference Online. ISBN   978-0-19-960908-6 . Retrieved 7 June 2012.
  3. "Romford: Introduction | British History Online".
  4. Robson, William (1939). The Government and Mis-government of London. London: Allen & Unwin.
  5. Great Britain Historical GIS / University of Portsmouth, Havering London Borough . Retrieved {{{accessdate}}}.
  6. "Harold Wood Hospital Site Summary Information". NHS.uk. Archived from the original on 26 September 2006.
  7. "PDU Case Report". Archived from the original on 4 June 2011.
  8. "Harold Wood - UK Census Data 2011".