Harry Batstone

Last updated
Harry Batstone
Born:(1899-05-09)May 9, 1899
Hamilton, Ontario
Died:March 10, 1972(1972-03-10) (aged 72) [1]
Kingston, Ontario [1]
Career information
Position(s) Running back
College Queen's University
Career history
As player
1919–1921 Toronto Argonauts
1922–1927 Queen's University
Career stats

Harry "Red" Batstone (September 5, 1899 – March 10, 1972) was a Canadian football player who played three seasons in the Interprovincial Rugby Football Union for the Toronto Argonauts and six seasons in the intercollegiate union for Queen's University. He was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame in the founding cohort in 1963, and into the Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in 1975.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Dr. Harry Batstone played with Argos", Toronto Star, 13 March 1972, p. 36