Harry Gallatin

Last updated

Harry Gallatin
Harry Gallatin.jpeg
Personal information
Born(1927-04-26)April 26, 1927
Roxana, Illinois
Died October 7, 2015(2015-10-07) (aged 88)
Edwardsville, Illinois
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Listed weight 210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school Roxana (Roxana, Illinois)
College Truman (1946–1948)
BAA draft 1948 / Round: -- / Pick: --
Selected by the New York Knicks
Playing career 1948–1958
Position Forward / Center
Number 11, 10
Career history
As player:
19481957 New York Knicks
1957–1958 Detroit Pistons
As coach:
1958–1962 Southern Illinois
19621965 St. Louis Hawks
19651966 New York Knicks
1967–1970 SIU Edwardsville
Career highlights and awards

As player:

As coach:

Halls of Fame:

  • NAIA Hall of Fame (1957)
  • IBCA Hall of Fame (1974)
  • Truman State Athletics Hall of Fame (1984 & 2007)
  • Missouri Sports Hall of Fame (1989)
  • SIU Edwardsville Athletics Hall of Fame (2005)
  • MIAA Hall of Fame (2010)
  • IHSA Basketball Hall of Fame (2014)
  • SIU Salukis Hall of Fame (2015)
Career BAA / NBA statistics
Points 8,843 (13.0 ppg)
Rebounds 6,684 (11.9 rpg)
Assists 1,208 (1.8 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com
Basketball Hall of Fame as player
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

Harry Junior "The Horse" Gallatin (April 26, 1927 – October 7, 2015) was an American professional basketball player and coach. Gallatin played nine seasons for the New York Knicks in the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1948 to 1957, as well as one season with the Detroit Pistons in the 1957–58 season. Gallatin led the NBA in rebounding and was named to the All-NBA First Team in 1954. The following year, he was named to the All-NBA Second Team. For his career, Gallatin played in seven NBA All-Star Games. A member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, he is also a member of the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame, the SIU Edwardsville Athletics Hall of Fame, the Truman State University Athletics Hall of Fame, the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame, two Illinois Basketball Halls of Fame, the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA) Hall of Fame, the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) Hall of Fame, and the SIU Salukis Hall of Fame. [1]

Basketball team sport played on a court with baskets on either end

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one or more one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

New York Knicks professional basketball team based in New York City, New York.

The New York Knickerbockers, more commonly referred to as the Knicks, are an American professional basketball team based in the borough of Manhattan, in New York City. The Knicks compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference. The team plays its home games at Madison Square Garden, an arena they share with the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League (NHL). They are one of two NBA teams located in New York City; the other is the Brooklyn Nets. Alongside the Boston Celtics, the Knicks are one of two original NBA teams still located in its original city.

The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a men's professional basketball league in North America; composed of 30 teams. It is widely considered to be the premier men's professional basketball league in the world. The NBA is an active member of USA Basketball (USAB), which is recognized by FIBA as the national governing body for basketball in the United States. The NBA is one of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. NBA players are the world's best paid athletes by average annual salary per player.

Contents

High school career

Growing up in Roxana, Illinois, Gallatin had taken interest in all sports and has been quoted as saying, "Competition has always been my cup of tea." [2] His drive for competition was amplified during his first year in high school as he attended Wood River High School from 1940–41. Since Roxana and some other outlying communities like Bethalto had no high school of their own at the time, all the athletes in the area attended Wood River, thus increasing the level of competition among them for varsity positions. The following year, however, Roxana got its own high school. He graduated from Roxana High School in 1944, and was granted a basketball scholarship by Northeast Missouri State Teachers' College (now known as Truman State University). But after graduating from Roxana High School, he enlisted in the United States Navy and served until the end of World War II. [3]

Roxana, Illinois Village in Illinois, United States

Roxana is a village in Madison County, Illinois, United States. The population was 1,542 at the 2010 census.

Bethalto, Illinois Village in Illinois, United States

Bethalto is a village located in Madison County, Illinois, United States. Bethalto, like the rest of Madison County, is part of the Illinois Metro East portion of the Greater St. Louis metropolitan area. The population of Bethalto was 9,521 at the 2010 census.

Roxana High School is a secondary school in Roxana, Illinois, United States. The school's mascot is the shell, named for the former Shell Oil refinery also located in the town. The school district encompasses all of Roxana, South Roxana, and parts of Wood River, Edwardsville and Rosewood Heights.

College career

At Northeast Missouri, he averaged 12.9 points per game and lead his team to a 59–4 record and two appearances in the NAIA tournament. [1] He earned his bachelor's degree from Northeast Missouri in only two years and would later receive his master's degree in physical education from the University of Iowa in 1954. [4]

University of Iowa public research university in Iowa City, Iowa, United States

The University of Iowa is a public research university in Iowa City, Iowa. Founded in 1847, it is the oldest and the second largest university in the state. The University of Iowa is organized into 11 colleges offering more than 200 areas of study and seven professional degrees.

Professional career

The New York Knicks selected Gallatin in the 1948 BAA draft. "It was a dream come true. I really didn't know what to expect; it was my first plane ride, from St. Louis to New York. Here I am a boy from Wood River, a country boy, and going to the Big Apple", Gallatin explained. "All I knew was that I loved to play basketball, and the Knicks had taken me with their number one choice. So I knew that they thought I had the kind of abilities they were looking for." [2]

The 1948 BAA draft was the second annual draft of the Basketball Association of America (BAA), which later became the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on May 10, 1948, before to the 1948–49 season. In this draft, eight BAA teams along with four teams who moved from the National Basketball League, took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players.

In his third year in the NBA, Gallatin was selected for the first NBA All-Star Game in 1951, and from 1951 to 1957 was chosen for seven consecutive NBA All-Star games. It was in the NBA where he earned the nickname "The Horse". He played his entire career as an undersized center at 6'6" and 215 lbs., but made up for it with tremendous physical strength. He played nine seasons for the New York Knicks, from 1948 to 1957. His best statistical year was in 1954, when he led the NBA in rebounding, averaging 15.3 rebounds per game. That same year, he was also named to the All-NBA First Team. His most dominating single-game performance was on the last regular season game of the 1952–53 season. That night, against the Fort Wayne Pistons, Gallatin pulled down 33 rebounds, a Knicks record which still stands today. [2] In the six seasons he played when rebounds were recorded, he was among the leaders in the league in rebounds per game. [5] For his career, he averaged 11.9 rebounds per game. Gallatin still holds the Knick team record of consecutive games played, with 610. [6]

The 1951 NBA All-Star Game was an exhibition basketball game played on March 2, 1951, at Boston Garden in Boston, Massachusetts, home of the Boston Celtics. The game was the first edition of the National Basketball Association (NBA) All-Star Game and was played during the 1950–51 NBA season. The idea of holding an All-Star Game was conceived during a meeting between NBA President Maurice Podoloff, NBA publicity director Haskell Cohen and Boston Celtics owner Walter A. Brown. At that time, the basketball world had just been stunned by the college basketball point-shaving scandal. In order to regain public attention to the league, Cohen suggested the league to host an exhibition game featuring the league's best players, similar to the Major League Baseball's All-Star Game. Although most people, including Podoloff, were pessimistic about the idea, Brown remained confident that it would be a success. He even offered to host the game and to cover all the expenses or potential losses incurred from the game. The Eastern All-Stars team defeated the Western All-Stars team 111–94. Boston Celtics' Ed Macauley was named as the first NBA All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Award. The game became a success, drawing an attendance of 10,094, much higher than that season's average attendance of 3,500.

The All-NBA Team is an annual National Basketball Association (NBA) honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. The voting is conducted by a panel of sportswriters and broadcasters throughout the United States and Canada. The team has been selected in every season of the league's existence, dating back to its inaugural season in 1946. The All-NBA Team originally had two teams, but since 1988 it is typically composed of three five-man lineups—a first, second, and third team.

After nine strong years with the Knicks, Gallatin was traded to the Detroit Pistons with Richard Atha and Nathaniel Clifton for Mel Hutchins and Charlie Tyra on April 3, 1957. [5] He played only one season for the Pistons before retiring as one of the most dominating post players of his era. [7]

Detroit Pistons professional basketball team in the National Basketball Association

The Detroit Pistons are an American professional basketball team based in Detroit, Michigan. The Pistons compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA) as a member of the league's Eastern Conference Central Division and plays its home games at Little Caesars Arena. The team was founded in Fort Wayne, Indiana as the Fort Wayne (Zollner) Pistons in 1941, a member of the National Basketball League (NBL) where it won two NBL championships: in 1944 and 1945. The Pistons later joined the Basketball Association of America (BAA) in 1948. The NBL and BAA merged to become the NBA in 1949, and the Pistons became part of the merged league. Since moving to Detroit in 1957, the Pistons have won three NBA championships: in 1989, 1990 and 2004.

Nathaniel Clifton American basketball player-coach

Nathaniel "Sweetwater" Clifton was an American multi-sport athlete best known as one of the first African Americans to play in the National Basketball Association (NBA).

Baseball career

In addition to basketball, Gallatin also played baseball. He played two seasons of varsity baseball at Northeast Missouri. [1] During the off-seasons between his first three seasons in the NBA, he played for the Class B Decatur, Illinois Cubs/Commodores of the Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League, which was an affiliate of the Chicago Cubs in 1949 and the Cincinnati Reds in 1950. He appeared in 46 games in those two seasons, winning 7, losing 9 and batting .227 in 75 at-bats. After the 1950 baseball season, however, he made basketball his only professional sport. [2] [8]

Post-playing life

After his retirement from playing in 1958, Gallatin became the head coach of the Southern Illinois University Salukis. In four seasons there, he led his teams to a 69–35 record and post-season tournament appearances every year. The 1961–62 team made it to the NCAA Small College (now Division II) Tournament semifinals before barely losing to eventual champion Mount St. Mary's College 58–57, then took third place by beating Nebraska Wesleyan University 98–81. [9]

He returned to the NBA in 1962 as coach of the St. Louis Hawks. In his first season, he led the Hawks to the division finals and was named NBA Coach of the Year. The 1963–64 season saw the Hawks again advance to the division finals, but halfway through 1964–65 he returned to New York to coach the Knicks while Richie Guerin replaced him as coach of the Hawks. The Knicks were developing into a championship team, but the pieces were not yet all in place and Gallatin left the Knicks and the NBA midway through the 1965–66 season. [10]

He became Assistant Dean of Students at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville in 1966, then the first athletic director and basketball coach in 1967. He remained at SIUE until his retirement in 1992, where he also taught in the physical education department and was the SIUE Cougars's men's golf coach for 24 years, leading that team to NCAA Division II championships 19 times and finishing in the top 10 six times. [11]

After his retirement from coaching, Gallatin remained active and enthusiastic, while continuing to live in Edwardsville, Illinois. [2] He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1991, [12] and was also named to nine other Halls of Fame. In 2011, the New York Knicks honored him in their second "Legends Night Awards" along with other former Knicks stars Dick Barnett, Earl Monroe, Mark Jackson, John Starks and Allan Houston, [13] and in May 2015, the Knicks added him to Madison Square Garden's Walk of Fame. [14]

On June 24, 2013, Gallatin took part as the SIUE athletics department broke ground for a new golf training facility. Following approval by the SIU Board of Trustees, it was officially named the Harry Gallatin Golf Training Facility. [15]

Harry Gallatin died on October 7, 2015 following surgery. He was survived by Beverly Hull Gallatin, his wife since 1949; their sons, Steve, Jim, and Bill; his sister, Eileen Palmer; eight grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. [16]

BAA/NBA career statistics

Legend
  GP Games played MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field-goal percentage FT%  Free-throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game APG  Assists per game
 PPG  Points per game Bold  Career high
*Led the league

Regular season

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG
1948–49 New York 52 .328 .710 1.2 8.3
1949–50 New York 68 .396 .757 0.8 11.8
1950–51 New York 66 .416 .732 12.1 2.7 12.8
1951–52 New York 66 29.3 .442 .806 10.0 3.4 11.2
1952–53 New York 70 33.3 .444 .700 13.1 1.8 12.4
1953–54 New York 7237.4 .404 .784 15.3* 2.1 13.2
1954–55 New York 72 35.4 .384 .814 13.8 2.4 14.6
1955–56 New York 72 33.0 .386 .787 10.3 2.3 13.9
1956–57 New York 72 27.0 .406 .800 10.1 1.2 15.0
1957–58 Detroit 72 27.6 .379 .787 10.4 1.2 14.9
Career 682 31.9 .398 .773 11.9 1.8 13.0

Playoffs

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG
1949 New York 6 .357 .821 1.7 12.0
1950 New York 5 .385 .781 1.2 13.0
1951 New York 14 .350 .770 11.6 1.9 11.8
1952 New York 14 33.6 .410 .773 9.6 1.4 10.8
1953 New York 11 27.5 .419 .746 10.9 1.4 10.5
1954 New York 4 37.8.457 .710 15.3 1.5 13.5
1955 New York 3 36.0 .452 .773 14.7 2.318.3
1958 Detroit 7 26.0 .368 .703 10.0 1.6 12.9
Career 64 31.2 .390 .761 11.2 1.6 12.0


Head coaching record

NBA

Legend
Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %
Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %
TeamYear G W L WL%Finish PG PW PL PWL% Result
St. Louis Hawks 1962–63 804832.6002nd in West1165.545Lost in Division Finals
St. Louis Hawks 1963–64 804634.5752nd in West1266.500Lost in Division Finals
St. Louis Hawks 1964–65 331716.515------
New York Knicks 1964–65 421923.452------
New York Knicks 1965–66 21615.286
Career total256136120.531231211.511

College

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Southern Illinois Salukis (Interstate Intercollegiate Athletic Conference)(1958–1962)
1958–59 Southern Illinois 17–10 9–3 2nd NCAA College Division Regional Third Place
1959–60 Southern Illinois 20–9 9–3 T–1st NAIA First Round
1960–61 Southern Illinois 21–6 12–0 1st NCAA College Division Regional Runner-up
1961–62 Southern Illinois 21–10 9–3 1st NCAA College Division Third Place
Southern Illinois: 79–35 39–9
SIU Edwardsville Cougars (NCAA College Division independent)(1967–1970)
1967–68 SIU Edwardsville 5–5
1968–69 SIU Edwardsville 7–10
1969–70 SIU Edwardsville 7–16
SIU Edwardsville: 19–31
Total: 58–40

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

See also

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References

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  3. Roseberry, Bill (January 9, 2015). "Gallatin is a local legend". Advantage News. Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  4. "Harry Gallatin, Hall of Fame NBA basketball player, dies at 88". The Washington Post. October 7, 2015. Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  5. 1 2 "Basketball-Reference.com: Harry Gallatin". Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved February 24, 2008.
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  7. KNICKS: #11 Harry Gallatin Archived October 15, 2011, at the Wayback Machine .
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  9. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/silu/sports/m-baskbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/prospectus/prospectus.pdf
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  15. "SIUE". SIUE. Retrieved October 8, 2015.
  16. "Harry Gallatin, Rugged and Durable Hall of Famer With the Knicks, Dies at 88". The New York Times. October 7, 2015. Retrieved October 8, 2015.