Harry Jacunski

Last updated

Harry Jacunski
Position: End
Personal information
Born:October 20, 1915
New Britain, Connecticut
Died:February 20, 2003(2003-02-20) (aged 87)
Wallingford, Connecticut
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:200 lb (91 kg)
Career information
College: Fordham
Undrafted: 1939
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Hieronym Anthony “Harry” Jacunski (October 20, 1915 – February 20, 2003) was a National Football League (NFL) player and college football coach for over 40 years.

Jacunski was an All-state center on the New Britain High School 1934 basketball team and played football with Vince Lombardi at Fordham University, where Jacunski was one of Fordham's "Seven Blocks of Granite". In 1938 he was co-captain of the Fordham football team where he started as end.

He played in the NFL for six seasons (19391944) as defensive end for the Green Bay Packers, who were NFL champions in 1939 and 1944.

In 1945 he started a 35-year coaching career: one year at University of Notre Dame, two years at Harvard University, and the last 33 years at Yale University. Jacunski was inducted into both the Fordham and Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame.

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