Harry S. Webb

Last updated

Harry S. Webb
Born(1892-10-15)October 15, 1892
DiedJuly 4, 1959(1959-07-04) (aged 66)
Hollywood
OccupationFilm producer
Film director
Screenwriter
Years active1924–1940
Spouse Rose Gordon

Harry S. Webb (October 15, 1892 July 4, 1959) was an American film producer, director and screenwriter. He produced 100 films between 1924 and 1940. He also directed 55 films between 1924 and 1940. He was the brother of "B"-film producer and director Ira S. Webb and the husband of screenwriter Rose Gordon, who wrote many of his films.

Contents

In 1933 Webb and Bernard B. Ray created Reliable Pictures Corporation with a studio at Beachwood and Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood. Reliable produced and released many Westerns, starting with Girl Trouble (1933), until the company closed in 1937. Its final release was The Silver Trail. [1]

Webb and Ray then started Metropolitan Pictures Corporation in 1938, which produced and released several films until 1940, its last being Pinto Canyon. [1] Webb then produced Westerns for Monogram Pictures.

He was born in Pennsylvania and died in Hollywood, from a heart attack.

Selected filmography

Poster for North of Arizona, a 1935 film directed by Webb North of Arizona.jpg
Poster for North of Arizona, a 1935 film directed by Webb

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tom London</span> American actor (1889–1963)

Tom London was an American actor who played frequently in B-Westerns. According to The Guinness Book of Movie Records, London is credited with appearing in the most films in the history of Hollywood, according to the 2001 book Film Facts, which says that the performer who played in the most films was "Tom London, who made his first of over 2,000 appearances in The Great Train Robbery, 1903. He used his birth name in films until 1924.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Johnny Mack Brown</span> American football player and actor (1904-1974)

John Brown was an American college football player and film actor billed as John Mack Brown at the height of his screen career. He acted and starred mainly in Western films.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ken Maynard</span> American actor

Kenneth Olin Maynard was an American actor and producer. He was mostly active from the 1920s to the 1940s and considered one of the biggest Western stars in Hollywood.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tom Tyler</span> American actor (1903–1954)

Tom Tyler was an American actor known for his leading roles in low-budget Western films in the silent and sound eras, and for his portrayal of superhero Captain Marvel in the 1941 serial film The Adventures of Captain Marvel. Tyler also played Kharis in 1940's The Mummy's Hand, a popular Universal Studios monster film.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jack Perrin</span> American actor (1896–1967)

Jack Perrin was an American actor specializing in Westerns.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Guinn "Big Boy" Williams</span> American actor (1899–1962)

Guinn Terrell Williams Jr. was an American actor who appeared in memorable westerns such as Dodge City (1939), Santa Fe Trail (1940), and The Comancheros (1961). He was nicknamed "Big Boy" as he was 6' 2" and had a muscular build from years of working on ranches and playing semi-pro and professional baseball, and at the height of his movie career was frequently billed above the title simply as Big Boy Williams or as "Big Boy" Guinn Williams on posters and in the film itself.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Raymond Hatton</span> American actor

Raymond William Hatton was an American film actor who appeared in almost 500 motion pictures.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jay Wilsey</span> American actor

Jay Wilsey was an American film actor. He appeared in nearly 100 films between 1924 and 1944. He starred in a series of very low-budget westerns in the 1920s and 1930s, billed as Buffalo Bill Jr.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lafe McKee</span> American actor

Lafayette S. "Lafe" McKee was an American actor who appeared in more than 400 films from 1912 to 1948. Part of his career was spent with Art Mix Productions. McKee also worked as a stage actor from 1910 until at least 1932, and began working in show business in 1893.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bud Osborne</span> American actor

Leonard Miles "Bud" Osborne was an American film actor. He appeared in more than 600 films and television programs between 1912 and 1963. He also was known as Lenny Osborne.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Slim Whitaker</span> American actor (1893–1960)

Charles Orbie "Slim" Whitaker was an American film actor. He appeared in more than 340 films between 1914 and 1949. He was born in Kansas City, Missouri, and died in Los Angeles, California, from a heart attack.

Ernie Adams (actor) American actor

Ernie Adams was an American vaudevillian performer, stage and screen actor and writer.

Reliable Pictures was an American film production and distribution company which operated from 1933 until 1937. Established by Harry S. Webb and Bernard B. Ray, it was a low-budget Poverty Row outfit that primarily specialized in Westerns. After its demise, the company's studios were taken over by Monogram Pictures.

Clarence Oliver Drake was an American film/television director, screenwriter, producer and actor who was most active in the Western genre. Though Drake began his career as an actor, he is best known as a prolific screenwriter and director of low-budget Western films. Drake was most active in the 1930s and 1940s, although he continued writing and directing films until 1974.

Benjamin Harrison Kline was an American cinematographer and film director. He was the father of Richard H. Kline.

Tremlet C. Carr was an American film producer, closely associated with the low-budget filmmaking of Poverty Row. In 1931 he co-founded Monogram Pictures, which developed into one of the leading specialist producers of B pictures in Hollywood.

Bernard B. Ray was a Russian-born American film producer and director. He is closely associated with the production of low-budget B films of Poverty Row, involved with companies such as Reliable Pictures during the 1930s.

Fred Bain (1895–1965) was an American film editor. A prolific worker, he edited over a hundred and seventy films, mainly westerns and action films, and also directed three. He worked at a variety of low-budget studios including Reliable Pictures, Grand National and Monogram Pictures. He was sometimes credited as Frederick Bain.

Raymond K. Johnson (1901–1999) was an American cinematographer and film director. He directed more than twenty films, mainly low budget westerns, for Poverty Row studios such as Monogram Pictures.

Carl Krusada (1879–1951) was an Austrian-born American screenwriter. He began his career in the silent era, sometimes using the name Val Cleveland. During the 1930s he worked prolifically writing screenplays for B Westerns produced by a variety of Poverty Row companies.

References