Harry Street (rugby league)

Last updated

Harry Street
Personal information
Full nameHarry Street
Born(1927-09-05)5 September 1927 [1]
Castleford, England
Died29 September 2002(2002-09-29) (aged 75) [1]
Huddersfield, England
Playing information
Position Centre, Loose forward
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1945(guest)Castleford 1
1945–49 St. Helens 323009
1949–51 Dewsbury
1951–55 Wigan 163320096
≤1957–≥57 Leeds
1958 Featherstone Rovers 120000
Total2083500105
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≥1949–≤58 Yorkshire 4
1950–53 England 61003
1950 Great Britain 40000
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
195864 Castleford 269137812451
196567 Keighley 0000
197172 Bradford Northern 0000
Total269137812451
Source: [2] [3] [4]

Harry Street (5 September 1927 – 29 September 2002) was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s, and coached in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford (World War II guest), St. Helens, Dewsbury, Wigan, Leeds and Featherstone Rovers (Heritage № 391), as a centre or loose forward, i.e. number 3 or 4, or 13, during the era of contested scrums, [2] [5] and coached at club level for Castleford and Bradford Northern, [6] [7] [8]

Contents

Background

Harry Street was born in Castleford, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, and he died aged 75 in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England.

Playing career

International honours

Harry Street won caps for England while at Dewsbury in 1950 against Wales (2 matches), and France, while at Wigan in 1951 against France, in 1952 against Wales, in 1953 against France, [3] and won caps for Great Britain while at Dewsbury in 1950 against Australia (3 matches), and New Zealand. [4]

Only five players have played test matches for Great Britain as both a back, and a forward, they are; Colin Dixon, Frank Gallagher, Laurie Gilfedder, Billy Jarman, and Harry Street. [9]

Championship Final appearances

Harry Street played loose forward, in Wigan's 13-6 victory over Bradford Northern in the Championship Final during the 1951–52 season at Leeds Road, Huddersfield on Saturday 10 May 1952. [10]

County League appearances

Harry Street played in Wigan's victory in the Lancashire County League during the 1951–52 season . [11]

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Harry Street played loose forward, in Leeds' 9-7 victory over Barrow in the 1956–57 Challenge Cup Final during the 1956–57 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 11 May 1957, in front of a crowd of 76,318. [12]

County Cup Final appearances

Harry Street played loose forward, in Wigan's 14-6 victory over Leigh in the 1951–52 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1951–52 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 27 October 1951, [13] and played loose forward, and scored a try in the 8-16 defeat by St. Helens in the 1953–54 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1953–54 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 24 October 1953.

Notable tour matches

Harry Street played loose forward, and scored a try in Wigan's 8-15 defeat by New Zealand at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 3 November 1951, [14] and scored a try in the 13–23 defeat by Australia at Central Park, Wigan on Wednesday 24 September 1952. [15]

Club career

St. Helens spotted Harry Street as an 18-year-old playing rugby union whilst stationed with the Army in Chepstow, and signed him as a centre, which was his regular position until an accident at work at one of the town's many glassworks broke his foot and deprived him of some of his pace. On Thursday 20 January 1949, Harry Street was transferred from St. Helens to Dewsbury for £1,000 (based on increases in average earnings, this would be approximately £81,430 in 2013) [16] along with Leonard Constance who was sold for £2,000, the £3,000 raised, contributed to the £4,000 St. Helens paid to Belle Vue Rangers for Stan McCormick, Harry Street made his début for Featherstone Rovers on Saturday 8 February 1958.

Coaching career

Club career

Harry Street was the coach of Castleford, his first game in charge was on Saturday 16 August 1958, and his last game in charge was on Monday 28 December 1964. [8]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Gus Risman
1964-1971
Coach
Bullscolours.svg
Bradford Northern

1971-1972
Succeeded by
Ian Brooke
1973-1975
Preceded by
Gordon Brown
196?
Coach
Cougscolours.svg
Keighley

1965-1967
Succeeded by
Donald Metcalfe
1967
Preceded by
William Rhodes
1957–1958
Coach
Castleford colours.svg
Castleford

1958-1964
Succeeded by
George Clinton
1964-1966

Genealogical information

Harry Street was the younger brother of the rugby league loose forward for Dewsbury and Doncaster; Arthur Street (birth registered during fourth ¼ 1922 in Pontefract district).

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References

  1. 1 2 Hadfield, Dave (21 October 2002). "Obituary: Harry Street ; Influential rugby league player, and coach who turned struggling Castleford into 'Classy Cas'". The Independent. London. p. 16. ProQuest   312126202.
  2. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. 1 2 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  5. David Smart & Andrew Howard (1 July 2000). "Images of Sport – Castleford Rugby League – A Twentieth Century History". The History Press Ltd. ISBN   978-0752418957
  6. "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  7. "Death of former Castleford coach". pontefractandcastlefordexpress.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  8. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at thecastlefordtigers.co.uk". 31 December 2014. Archived from the original on 13 August 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  9. Williams, Graham; Lush, Peter; Farrar, David (2009). The British Rugby League Records Book. London League. p. 160. ISBN   978-1-903659-49-6.
  10. "1951–1952 Championship Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  11. "Statistics at wigan.rlfans.com". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  12. "On This Day – 11 May". therhinos.co.uk. 31 December 2012. Archived from the original on 3 February 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  13. "1951–1952 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  14. "1951 Tour match: Wigan 8 New Zealand 15". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  15. "1952 Tour match: Wigan 13 Australia 23". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  16. "Measuring Worth – Relative Value of UK Pounds". Measuring Worth. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.