Harry Vallence

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Harry Vallence
Personal information
Full name Henry Francis Vallence
Nickname(s) Soapy
Date of birth 4 June 1905
Place of birth Bacchus Marsh, Victoria
Date of death 25 July 1991(1991-07-25) (aged 86)
Original team(s) Bacchus Marsh (BFL)
Height 183 cm (6 ft 0 in)
Weight 80 kg (176 lb)
Position(s) Full forward
Playing career1
YearsClubGames (Goals)
1926–1938 Carlton 204 (722)
Representative team honours
YearsTeamGames (Goals)
Victoria 4 (17)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1938.
Career highlights
  • Carlton premiership player (1938)
  • VFL leading goalkicker 1931
  • Carlton leading goalkicker 1929, 1931–1933, 1935–1938
  • Carlton Hall of Fame (1987)
  • Carlton Team of the 20th Century
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com

Henry Francis "Soapy" Vallence (4 June 1905 – 25 July 1991) was a champion Australian rules footballer in the Victorian Football League (VFL) and the Victorian Football Association (VFA). He played at full forward for the VFL's Carlton Football Club in the 1930s, and in the 1940s for the VFA's Williamstown and Brighton Football Clubs.

Contents

Family

The son of Michael Vallence, and Mary Ann Vallence, née Pattinson, [1] Henry Francis Vallence was born in Bacchus Marsh, Victoria on 4 June 1905.

He married Lorna Josephine Bliss (1915-1996) on 17 June 1940. [2]

Football

Carlton (VFL)

Originally from Bacchus Marsh, in 1926 he came to Carlton as a half-forward. He soon moved to full forward where he became known for his safe hands and mighty kick. He kicked 11 goals in a match on four occasions – twice in finals.

Williamstown (VFA)

In 1937 he left Carlton to play with Williamstown Football Club in the Victorian Football Association as captain-coach. His dispute with Carlton arising when he returned from representing Victoria in an interstate match to find himself selected at centre halfback in the seconds grade.

Carlton (VFL)

He was lured back to Carlton for the 1938 season, helping to secure the Blues first premiership in 23 years.

Williamstown (VFA)

Vallence returned again to Williamstown in 1939, this time playing under the Association's throw-pass rules adopted in 1938. In 1939, Vallence kicked 133 goals, and helped Williamstown to a premiership, and kicked another 111 goals in 1940. On 24 May 1941, Vallence achieved two significant milestones: he kicked a career-high twenty goals against Sandringham, and brought up his 1000th career goal across both the League and Association. [3] His career with Williamstown ended after 1941, when the competition went into recess during World War II.

Carlton (VFL)

He was captain-coach of the Carlton Reserves for three seasons (1942-1944). [4]

Brighton (VFA)

Vallence resumed playing after World War II as the captain-coach at Brighton, where he played his last game in 1946 (kicking 11 goals). [5] [6]

Vallence played 204 games and kicked 722 goals for Carlton in his career; the latter was a club record until broken by Stephen Kernahan in 1997. He scored a further 337 goals for Williamstown, 88 for Brighton, and 19 in representative games for Victoria, for a career total of 1166 goals.

Death

He died on 25 July 1991 of Alzheimer's disease in Geelong Hospital.

Recognition

In 1996 Vallence was inducted into the Australian Football Hall of Fame.

Footnotes

  1. Myrniong, The Bacchus Marsh Express, (Saturday, 17 November 1900), p.3.
  2. Brides To Say "I Will", The Williamstown Chronicle, (Saturday, 15 June 1940), p.2.
  3. "Twenty goals to Vallence". Williamstown Chronicle. Williamstown, VIC. 30 May 1941. pp. 1, 10.
  4. Carlton Makes a "Raid", The Williamstown Chronicle, (Friday, 7 August 1942), p.2.
  5. Ross, John (1999). The Australian Football Hall of Fame. Australia: HarperCollinsPublishers. p. 131. ISBN   0-7322-6426-X.
  6. Devaney, J., Biographies T-U-V Archived 7 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine , Retrieved 30 October 2010.

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