Hashimiya District

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Hashimiya District

Arabic: قضاء الهاشمية
Country Flag of Iraq.svg  Iraq
Governorates Babil Governorate
Seat Al Hashimiyah
Time zone UTC+3 (AST)
Map of Babil Governorate showing districts Map of Babil Governorate by Districts.png
Map of Babil Governorate showing districts

Hashimiya District is a district of the Babil Governorate, Iraq. The seat of the district is Al Hashimiyah.

Babil Governorate Governorate in Hillah, Iraq

Babil Governorate or Babylon Province is a governorate in central Iraq. It has an area of 5,119 square kilometres (1,976 sq mi), with an estimated population of 2,065,042 people in 2018. The provincial capital is the city of Hillah, which lies opposite the ancient city of Babylon (بابل), on the Euphrates river.

Iraq Republic in Western Asia

Iraq, officially the Republic of Iraq, is a country in Western Asia, bordered by Turkey to the north, Iran to the east, Kuwait to the southeast, Saudi Arabia to the south, Jordan to the southwest and Syria to the west. The capital, and largest city, is Baghdad. Iraq is home to diverse ethnic groups including Arabs, Kurds, Chaldeans, Assyrians, Turkmen, Shabakis, Yazidis, Armenians, Mandeans, Circassians and Kawliya. Around 95% of the country's 37 million citizens are Muslims, with Christianity, Yarsan, Yezidism and Mandeanism also present. The official languages of Iraq are Arabic and Kurdish.

Al Hashimiyah Place in Babil, Iraq

Al Hashimiyah is a town in Babil Governorate, Iraq. It is located 130 kilometres (81 mi) south of Baghdad.

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