Haugesund

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Haugesund kommune
Haugesund.jpg
View of Smedasundet and parts of central Haugesund
Haugesund komm.svg
Coat of arms
Norway Counties Rogaland Position.svg
Rogaland within
Norway
NO 1106 Haugesund.svg
Haugesund within Rogaland
Coordinates: 59°26′47″N05°17′54″E / 59.44639°N 5.29833°E / 59.44639; 5.29833 Coordinates: 59°26′47″N05°17′54″E / 59.44639°N 5.29833°E / 59.44639; 5.29833
Country Norway
County Rogaland
District Haugaland
Administrative centreHaugesund
Government
  Mayor (2015)Arne Christian Mohn (Ap)
Area
  Total72.67 km2 (28.06 sq mi)
  Land68.36 km2 (26.39 sq mi)
  Water4.31 km2 (1.66 sq mi)
Area rank#396 in Norway
Population
(2017)
  Total37,167
  Rank#23 in Norway
  Density543.7/km2 (1,408/sq mi)
  Change (10 years)
15.1%
Demonym(s) Haugesundar
Haugesunder [1]
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 code NO-1106
Official language form Bokmål
Website www.haugesund.kommune.no

Loudspeaker.svg Haugesund   (HGSD) is a city and municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. The town is the main population centre of the Haugaland region in northern Rogaland. The majority of the population of Haugesund lives in the main urban area surrounding the city centre, with the northwestern part of the municipality being fairly rural. [2]

City Large and permanent human settlement

A city is a large human settlement. Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process.

Rogaland County (fylke) of Norway

Rogaland[²ruːɡɑlɑn](listen) is a county in Western Norway, bordering Hordaland, Telemark, Aust-Agder, and Vest-Agder counties. Rogaland is the center of the Norwegian petroleum industry. In 2016, Rogaland had an unemployment rate of 4.9%, one of the highest in Norway. In 2015, Rogaland had a fertility rate of 1.78 children per woman, which is the highest in the country.

Counties of Norway administrative regions that form the primary first-level subdivisions of Norway

Norway is divided into 18 administrative regions, called counties ; until 1918, they were known as amter. The counties form the first-level subdivisions of Norway and are further divided into 422 municipalities. The island territories of Svalbard and Jan Mayen are outside the county division and ruled directly at the national level. The capital Oslo is considered both a county and a municipality.

Contents

Location

The town is situated on a strategically important sound, the Karmsundet, through which ships could pass without traversing heavy seas. In the early years, the coastal waters off Haugesund were a huge source of herring, and the town grew accordingly. Despite being barely a village back then, King Harald Fairhair lived at Avaldsnes, very close to the modern town of Haugesund. In the last decades, the town, like its neighbours, has been turning towards the petroleum industry, with the herring being long gone.

Sound (geography) A long, relatively wide body of water, connecting two larger bodies of water

In geography, a sound is a large sea or ocean inlet, deeper than a bight and wider than a fjord; or a narrow sea or ocean channel between two bodies of land.

Karmsund

Karmsund is a strait located in Rogaland county, Norway. The 30-kilometre (19 mi) long strait divides the island of Karmøy on the west and the mainland of Norway and island of Vestre Bokn in the east. The strait runs through the municipalities of Haugesund, Karmøy, and Bokn. The town of Haugesund lies at the northern end of the strait and the town of Kopervik lies in the central part of the strait, and the village of Skudeneshavn lies near the southern end where the strait flows into the Boknafjorden. The Karmsund Bridge, a part of the European route E134 highway, links Karmøy to the mainland. The bridge was completed in 1955. The small islands of Vibrandsøy, Risøy, and Hasseløy lie in the strait at the northern end, just off shore from the town of Haugesund.

Herring forage fish, mostly belonging to the family Clupeidae

Herring are forage fish, mostly belonging to the family Clupeidae.

Population

The 73-square-kilometre (28 sq mi) municipality is the 396th largest by area out of the 422 municipalities in Norway, making it one of the smallest in Norway. Haugesund is the 23rd most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 37,166. The municipality's population density is 543.7 inhabitants per square kilometre (1,408/sq mi) and its population has increased by 15.1% over the last decade. [3] The "urban area" of the town of Haugesund, which actually crosses over slightly into the neighboring municipality of Karmøy, has a total of about 40,152 (of that 5,425 people live in Karmøy) people. This leaves about 2,000 residents of Haugesund that live outside the town of Haugesund in the rural portion of the municipality. [4]

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

Karmøy Municipality in Rogaland, Norway

Karmøy is a municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. It is southwest of the city of Haugesund in the traditional district of Haugaland. The administrative centre of the municipality is the town of Kopervik.

The Haugesund Region, a statistical metropolitan area, which consists of the municipalities Karmøy, Haugesund, Tysvær, Sveio and Bokn, has a population of approximately 100,000 people (as of 2009).

Metropolitan regions of Norway

There are 16 statistical metropolitan areas in Norway, of which six count as "Greater City Regions" (Storbyregioner) and ten as "City Regions" (Byregioner). The classification comes from Storbymeldingen from the Norwegian Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development. This report was composed in 2002–2003 to create a coherent policy for the development of metropolitan areas within Norwegian society. It was presented by then Minister of Local Government and Regional Development Erna Solberg on 12 March 2003. The Greater City Regions contain cities with numbers of inhabitants ranging from around 60,000 to 1.4 million, while the City Regions range from around 45 to 175 thousand. This is out of a national population of around 5.2 million citizens.

Tysvær Municipality in Rogaland, Norway

Tysvær is a municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. It is part of the Haugalandet region. The municipality is located on the Haugalandet peninsula on the northern side of the Boknafjorden, just east of the towns of Kopervik and Haugesund. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Aksdal. Other villages in the municipality include Dueland, Førre, Grinde, Hervik, Hindaråvåg, Nedstrand, Skjoldastraumen, Susort, Tysvær, and Yrke.

Sveio Municipality in Hordaland, Norway

Sveio is a municipality in Hordaland county, Norway. Sveio is a border district that is sometimes considered to be located in the traditional district of Haugalandet since it is located on the Haugalandet peninsula, but it is also considered to be in the traditional district of Sunnhordland since it is located in southern Hordaland county. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Sveio. Other villages in the municipality include Auklandshamn, Førde, Våga, and Valevåg.

History

Haraldshaugen Haraldshaugen.JPG
Haraldshaugen

Despite being a fairly young town, the areas around Haugesund were lands of power during the Viking Age. Harald Fairhair, the first king of Norway, had his home at Avaldsnes, very close to the present town. Fairhair was buried at Haraldshaugen, a burial mound adjacent to the Karmsundet strait. This site is the namesake of the town and municipality of Haugesund. The national monument at Haraldshaugen was raised in 1872, to commemorate the 1000th anniversary of the Battle of Hafrsfjord in 872. The Battle of Hafrsfjord has traditionally been regarded as when western Norway was unified under a single monarch for the first time. [5]

Viking Age Period of European history from the 8th to the 11th century dealing with the Scandinavian expansion

The Viking Age is a period in European history, especially Northern European and Scandinavian history, following the Germanic Iron Age. It is the period of history when Scandinavian Norsemen explored Europe by its seas and rivers for trade, raids, colonization, and conquest. In this period, the Norsemen settled in Norse Greenland, Newfoundland, and present-day Faroe Islands, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Normandy, Scotland, England, Wales, Ireland, Isle of Man, the Netherlands, Germany, Ukraine, Russia, Turkey and Italy.

Harald Fairhair Legendary first King of Norway

Harald Fairhair is portrayed by medieval Icelandic historians as the first King of Norway. According to traditions current in Norway and Iceland in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, he reigned from c. 872 to 930. Supposedly, two of his sons, Eric Bloodaxe and Haakon the Good, succeeded Harald to become kings after his death.

Avaldsnes Village in Western Norway, Norway

Avaldsnes is a village in Karmøy municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. The village is located on the northeastern part of the island of Karmøy, along the Karmsundet strait, just south of the town of Haugesund. The village was an ancient centre of power on the west coast of Norway and is the site of one of Norway’s more important areas of cultural history. The trading port of Notow and the Avaldsnes Church are two notable historic sites in Avaldsnes.

Karmoy pastures and St. Olav's church at Avaldsnes Karmoya-stolav.jpg
Karmøy pastures and St. Olav's church at Avaldsnes

The urban village area of Haugesund (population: 1,066) was declared to be a "town" and it was separated from the municipality of Torvastad on 1 February 1855 to become a separate municipality of its own. On 1 January 1911, a small urban area of Skåre (population: 3,847) that directly abutted the town of Haugesund was transferred to Haugesund. On 1 January 1958, the remainder of the municipality of Skåre was merged with the town of Haugesund, creating a larger Haugesund municipality. On 1 January 1965, the island of Vibrandsøy (population: 70) was transferred from Torvastad municipality to Haugesund. [6]

Torvastad Former Municipality in Western Norway, Norway

Torvastad is a former municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. The municipality existed from 1838 until 1965. The administrative centre was the village of Haugesund, and after that it was the village of Torvastad on the island of Karmøy. Today, the area of Torvastad refers to the northern part of the municipality of Karmøy.

Skåre, Norway Former Municipality in Western Norway, Norway

Skåre is a former municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. The 68-square-kilometre (26 sq mi) municipality existed from 1881 until 1958 when it was merged into the neighboring town of Haugesund. Originally, it encompassed the far northwestern corner of Rogaland county, plus several islands off the western coast. Today, Skåre refers to the northern part of the town of Haugesund.

Vibrandsøy

Vibrandsøy or Vibrandsøya is an island in Haugesund municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. The island lies west of the densely built-up island of Hasseløy and northwest of the island of Risøy in the town of Haugesund. The island is now used as a recreational area. The island was part of the Torvastad municipality until 1965, and is the only part of the former municipality which was not incorporated into Karmøy. As such, the island is the newest part of the Haugesund municipality.

Haugesund has a strong historical bond to the sea and especially the herring. In the earlier years, the coastal waters of Haugesund were a huge source for fishing herring, and the town grew accordingly. The protective straits of Smedasund and Karmsund gave the town potential to grow in both fishing and shipping. Even to this day, Karmsund is one of Norway's busiest waterways. The town is still growing geographically even though the population has increased only moderately the last decade. Today the herring is long gone, and the town is turning more and more towards the petroleum industry, like its neighbouring town to the south, Stavanger.

Etymology

The town is named after the Haugesundet strait. The first element (Hauge) goes back to the genitive plural of the Old Norse word haugr meaning hill or mound. The last element is sund meaning strait or sound. [2]

Coat of arms

The coat-of-arms for Haugesund was granted on 5 March 1930. They were designed by Hallvard Trætteberg. The arms are blue with three silver/white seagulls lined up vertically. The seagulls and blue color were chosen to represent the importance of the sea. These arms replaced the old coat-of-arms that were granted on 29 December 1862. The old arms showed three herring barrels, an anchor, and three seagulls. The old arms showed the importance of herring fishing and processing in the town. The three barrels also represented the three parts of the municipality: the mainland and the islands of Hasseløy and Risøy. The new arms from 1930 removed the herring barrels due to the decline in the importance of that industry. [7]

Geography

Urban area of Haugesund (2005) Haugesund tettsted 2005.jpg
Urban area of Haugesund (2005)

Haugesund has a coastline with the North Sea, however, the island of Karmøy and the archipelago of Røvær shelter most of the city from the rough waters of the ocean. The Karmsundet strait, located between Karmøy and Haugesund used to be very strategically important, since ships could pass without having to sail through heavy sea. Haugesund's city centre has a distinctive street layout, similar to those found in Kristiansand and Oslo. Haugesund has a typical maritime climate with mild winters, cool but pleasant springs, and mild summers lasting until the end of September. Monthly 24-hr average range from 1.1 °C (34.0 °F) in February to 14 °C (57 °F) in August. Mean annual precipitation is 1,520 millimetres (60 in), with September to December as the wettest period. [8]

The municipality includes several islands. Risøy and Hasseløy are densely built, and connected to the mainland by bridges. Røvær which lies further out and consists of a number of islands, is also populated and connected to the mainland by ferry. Vibrandsøy and its neighboring islands are now mainly a recreational area. Røværsholmen Lighthouse sits just off the coast of the main Røvær island. The lakes Vigdarvatnet and Stakkastadvatnet are located in the municipality.

Cityscape

Haugesund from the Risoy bridge Haugesund2.jpg
Haugesund from the Risøy bridge
The city hall, designed by Gudolf Blakstad and Herman Munthe-Kaas Rathaus Haugesund.jpg
The city hall, designed by Gudolf Blakstad and Herman Munthe-Kaas
Common street in Haugesund Haugesundsgate.JPG
Common street in Haugesund

Haugesund's town hall was built in 1931, celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2006. [9] The pink city hall, designed by Gudolf Blakstad and Herman Munthe-Kaas, [10] is one of the finest neo-classical buildings in Norway, and has been elected the most beautiful building in Haugesund. [11] It is also included in the new Norwegian edition of monopoly after it was successful in a national vote. The building may not be altered in any way without permission from the national preservation agency. It overlooks the town square and a park which was inaugurated on 28 August 1949. [11]

The town has during the last 20 years established its position as the main trading centre for the Haugaland region and southern parts of Hordaland county. It has several relatively large shopping centres, considering the size of the town. However, this has led to a decline of the trade and shopping activity in the town centre. [12]

Risoybrua seen from Risoy. Photo: Knut Arne Gjertsen Risoybrua sett fra Risoy.jpg
Risøybrua seen from Risøy. Photo: Knut Arne Gjertsen
Haugesund docks, with bridge to Risoy Haugesund1.jpg
Haugesund docks, with bridge to Risøy

Transport

MS Draupner, one of the catamaran ferries on the former route Bergen - Haugesund - Stavanger MS Draupner(1999).jpg
MS Draupner, one of the catamaran ferries on the former route Bergen – Haugesund – Stavanger

Haugesund Airport, located on the island of Karmøy to the southwest of Haugesund in Karmøy municipality, has year-round flights to Oslo and Gdańsk in addition to some seasonal and charter destinations. [13] The Norwegian airline Coast Air was based at Haugesund airport, but filed for bankruptcy on 23 January 2008. [14]

The European Route E39 bypasses Haugesund to the east, passing through Aksdal. The European Route E134 leads eastwords to Drammen outside Oslo.

The bus station in Haugesund is located at Flotmyr on the east side of the downtown area. Long distance bus services are available to Stavanger, Bergen, and Oslo. The local bus transport is operated by Tide Buss, on a contract with Kolumbus lasting to 2017. [15]

The town is connected to the island of Utsira by car ferry, and to the islands of Røvær and Feøy by passenger ferry. Until 2008, the Newcastle–Bergen–Stavanger ferry operated here as well.

Government

Part of central Haugesund Haugesund, Norway - panoramio.jpg
Part of central Haugesund

All municipalities in Norway, including Haugesund, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elect a mayor.

Municipal council

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Haugesund is made up of 49 representatives that are elected every four years. For 2015–2019, the party breakdown is as follows: [16]

Haugesund Kommunestyre 2015–2019
Party NameName in NorwegianNumber of
representatives
  Labour Party Arbeiderpartiet19
  Progress Party Fremskrittspartiet7
  Conservative Party Høyre11
  Christian Democratic Party Kristelig Folkeparti3
  Green Party Miljøpartiet De Grønne2
  Pensioners' Party Pensjonistpartiet2
  Centre Party Senterpartiet1
  Socialist Left Party Sosialistisk Venstreparti2
  Liberal Party Venstre2
Total number of members:49

Culture

Haugesund is the main cultural centre for its region, and is home to several festivals, the largest being the Norwegian International Film Festival and Sildajazz, an international jazz festival with approximately 70 bands and close to 200 concerts. Every August, The Norwegian Trad-jazz festival, the Sildajazz is held. Both local and international musicians are presented at the Sildajazz. [17]

In the summer of 2004, the annual rock festival, ""RockFest"" started. It attracted local, national and international pop and rock bands, such as Elton John, Madcon, DumDum Boys and Kaizers Orchestra. The festival started as a part of the celebration of Haugesund's 150 year anniversary. In 2009, the last Rockfest was held, and got replaced by a new concept in 2010; Haugesund Live. Haugesund Live is a series of individual concerts, and has featured bands such as The Baseballs, Kim Larsen and Mötley Crüe.

The soccer team from Haugesund, FK Haugesund is playing in the Norway's highest league, Tippeligaen.

The Norwegian International Film Festival has since 1973 been held in Haugesund, premiering and showing international and Norwegian films. The Amanda Award, Norway's variation of the Oscars, has been held in Haugesund since 1985 [18] in concurrence with the film festival.

Haugesunds Avis is a daily newspaper published in Haugesund, but with branches in Bømlo, Kopervik, Odda, Sauda and Stord. Founded in 1895, it is today owned by the investment group Mecom Group, and is as such part of the media group Edda Media. In 2006, Haugesunds Avis had a circulation of 33 448. [19] As of 2007, the executive editor is Tonny Nundal. The newspaper owns the local radio channel Radio 102.

Churches

The Church of Norway has three parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Haugesund. It is part of the Haugaland deanery in the Diocese of Stavanger.

Churches in Haugesund
Parish (Sokn)Church NameLocation of the ChurchYear Built
Rossabø Rossabø Church Rossabø 1972
Skåre Skåre Church Haugesund1858
Udland Church Haugesund2002
Vår Frelser Vår Frelsers Church Haugesund1901

Education

The main campus of Stord/Haugesund University College is located in Haugesund. Established in 1994, it is the result of the merger between Haugesund Nursing College, Stord Teachers College, and Stord Nursing College. [20] The university college has approximately 2700 students and 260 employees, [20] thus making it one of the smallest university colleges in Norway.

Sports

International relations

Twin towns – sister cities

Haugesund has sister city agreements with the following places:

Each of the sister cities (with exception of Emden) has given its name to a street in Haugesund. The streets are located in the same area near the border to the neighbouring municipality. [22]

Marilyn Monroe sculpture at Haugesund Marilyn Monroe sculpture, Haugesund.jpg
Marilyn Monroe sculpture at Haugesund

Notable people

See also

Related Research Articles

Bokn Municipality in Rogaland, Norway

Bokn is a municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Haugaland. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Føresvik, the only urban area in Bokn. Other villages in Bokn include Arsvågen, Trosnavåg, and Loten. The island municipality is mostly located on the three islands of Ognøya, Vestre Bokn, and Austre Bokn. All three main islands are connected to the mainland via a network of bridges.

Vindafjord Municipality in Rogaland, Norway

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Fitjar Municipality in Hordaland, Norway

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Austevoll Municipality in Hordaland, Norway

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Haugaland District in Rogaland and Hordaland, Norway

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Kopervik Former Municipality

Kopervik is the largest town on the island of Karmøy in Rogaland county, Norway. It is also the administrative centre of the municipality of Karmøy. It is part of the traditional district of Haugaland. The 4.85-square-kilometre (1,200-acre) town has a population (2014) of 8,215; giving the town a population density of 1,694 inhabitants per square kilometre (4,390/sq mi). The municipality of Karmøy has about 42,000 inhabitants, so this means Kopervik is home to about 20% of the municipal population.

Skudeneshavn Town in Western Norway, Norway

Skudeneshavn  is a town in Karmøy municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. It is located on the southernmost tip of the island of Karmøy at the entrance to the Boknafjorden and Karmsundet strait. The town is part of the traditional district of Haugaland.

Åkrehamn town in Western Norway, Norway

Åkrehamn  or Åkrahamn is a small town in Karmøy municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. The town is located on the west side of the island of Karmøy in the traditional district of Haugaland. The town sits about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) west of the town of Kopervik, about 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) north of the town of Skudeneshavn, and about 25 kilometres (16 mi) southwest of the town of Haugesund. The village of Veavågen lies immediately to the northeast of Åkrehamn.

Vormedal Village in Western Norway, Norway

Vormedal is a village in Karmøy municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. The village is located about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) south of the city of Haugesund in Western Norway. It sits on the mainland along the Karmsundet strait, directly across the strait from the village of Avaldsnes on the island of Karmøy. The 1.28-square-kilometre (320-acre) village has a population (2014) of 2738, giving the village a population density of 2,139 inhabitants per square kilometre (5,540/sq mi).

Stangaland Former Municipality in Western Norway, Norway

Stangaland is a former municipality in Rogaland county, Norway. It was part of the traditional district of Haugaland. Stangaland existed from 1909 until 1965 when it was merged into Karmøy. The 28-square-kilometre (11 sq mi) municipality encompassed the rural areas surrounding the coastal city of Kopervik on the island of Karmøy. Today, the area is part of the town of Kopervik.

Åkra Former Municipality in Western Norway, Norway

Åkra is a former municipality in the traditional district of Haugaland in Rogaland county, Norway. The 33-square-kilometre (13 sq mi) municipality existed from 1892 until 1965 and it encompassed the central part of the western coast of the island of Karmøy. The administrative centre was the village of Åkrahamn.

Auklandshamn Village in Western Norway, Norway

Auklandshamn or Økland is a village in Sveio municipality in Hordaland county, Norway. The village is located in the northern part of the traditional district of Haugaland, along the southern shore of the Bømlafjorden. Historically, the area was part of the municipality of Finnås, but it was transferred to the municipality of Valestrand in 1870. In 1964, it was transferred to the municipality of Sveio.

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