Hauraki-Waikato

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Hauraki-Waikato electorate boundaries used since the 2008 election Hauraki-Waikato electorate, 2014.svg
Hauraki-Waikato electorate boundaries used since the 2008 election

Hauraki-Waikato is a New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorate first established for the 2008 election. It largely replaced the Tainui electorate. Nanaia Mahuta of the Labour Party, formerly the MP for Tainui, became MP for Hauraki-Waikato in the 2008 general election and was re-elected in 2011, 2014 and 2017.

Contents

Population centres

The electorate includes the following population centres:

Downtown Hamilton Hlz victoriast.jpg
Downtown Hamilton

Within Auckland Region
Waiheke Island, Papakura, Pukekohe, Waiuku, Clarks Beach, Ramarama, Bombay, Pokeno

Within Waikato Region
Meremere, Huntly, Whitianga, Whangamata, Thames, Paeroa, Waihi, Hamilton, Ngaruawahia, Morrinsville, Matamata, Cambridge, Te Awamutu, Raglan, Kawhia

In the 2007 boundary redistribution, the Tainui electorate was reduced in size by transferring the tribal area of Ngāti Maniapoto to the Te Tai Hauāuru electorate, and in the process, the electorate was renamed as Hauraki-Waikato. [1] There was no further boundary adjustment undertaken in the 2013/14 redistribution. [2]

Tribal areas

The electorate includes the following tribal areas:

History

The electorate was originally proposed by Elections New Zealand as "Pare Hauraki-Pare Waikato"1 to even out the numbers on the voting roll in Tainui and Te Tai Hauauru. [3] Labour's Nanaia Mahuta won the 2008 election against Angeline Greensill of the Māori Party. [4] In the 2011 election, Mahuta defeated Greensill with a greatly increased margin of 35.5% of the candidate vote. [5] Mahuta won the 2014 election with another decisive majority. [6]

1Translation: [7] Tainui tribes of Hauraki - Tainui tribes of Waikato

Members of Parliament

Key

  Labour   

ElectionWinner
2008 election Nanaia Mahuta
2011 election
2014 election
2017 election

Election results

2017 election

2017 general election: Hauraki-Waikato [8]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Nanaia Mahuta 15,30614,27961.5
Māori Stanley Rahui Papa6,0832,63511.3
NZ First  1,936
National  1,594
Green  1,193
Opportunities  582
Legalise Cannabis  240
Mana  230
People's Party  31
Ban 1080  29
ACT  20
Conservative  18
Outdoors  13
United Future  6
Democrats  4
Internet  4
Informal votes843402
Total Valid votes22,23223,216
Labour holdMajority9,223

2014 election

2014 general election: Hauraki-Waikato [9]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Nanaia Mahuta 12,19161.56+3.199,72446.50+0.39
Māori Susan Cullen4,49622.70+5.352,50411.97-1.09
Mana Angeline Greensill 3,11615.73-7.11
NZ First  2,79613.37+3.54
Green  2,0439.77+0.64
Internet Mana  1,6898.08-3.14
National  1,5837.57-0.76
Legalise Cannabis  3061.46+0.02
Conservative  1590.76+0.34
ACT  430.21+0.00
Ban 1080  340.16+0.16
United Future  140.07-0.11
Focus  100.05+0.05
Democrats  50.02+0.01
Civilian  30.01+0.01
Independent Coalition  10.005+0.005
Informal votes742302
Total Valid votes20,54521,216
Labour holdMajority7,69538.86+3.33

2011 election

2011 general election: Hauraki-Waikato [5]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Nanaia Mahuta 9,75158.38+5.888,25046.11-6.45
Mana Angeline Greensill 3,81622.84+22.842,00711.22+11.22
Māori Tau Bruce Mataki2,89917.36-30.152,33713.06-14.62
Nga Iwi Te Ariki Karamaene2381.42+1.42
NZ First  1,7589.83+4.36
Green  1,6349.13+5.90
National  1,4918.33+1.12
Legalise Cannabis  2581.44+0.18
Conservative  760.42+0.42
ACT  370.21-0.40
United Future  330.18+0.01
Libertarianz  80.04+0.01
Alliance  20.01±0.00
Democrats  20.01±0.00
Informal votes1,078436
Total Valid votes16,70417,893
Labour holdMajority5,93535.53+30.54

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 33,215 [10]

2008 election

2008 general election: Hauraki-Waikato [4]
Notes:

Blue background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member, or other incumbent.
A Green check.svgY or Red x.svgN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

PartyCandidateVotes%±%Party votes%±%
Labour Green check.svgY Nanaia Mahuta 9,34952.499,81952.55
Māori Angeline Greensill 8,46147.515,17227.68
National  1,3477.21
NZ First  1,0225.47
Green  6033.23
Legalise Cannabis  2361.26
Family Party  1380.74
ACT  1130.60
Bill and Ben  980.52
Progressive  410.22
Kiwi  330.18
United Future  330.18
Libertarianz  70.04
Workers Party  60.03
Pacific  50.03
RONZ  40.02
RAM  30.02
Alliance  20.01
Democrats  20.01
Informal votes697358
Total Valid votes17,81018,684
Turnout 19,45460.89
Labour win new seatMajority8884.99

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References

  1. Report of the Representation Commission 2007 (PDF). Representation Commission. 14 September 2007. p. 11. ISBN   978-0-477-10061-8. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 January 2019. Retrieved 1 October 2014.
  2. Report of the Representation Commission 2014 (PDF). Representation Commission. 4 April 2014. p. 11. ISBN   978-0-477-10414-2. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 October 2014. Retrieved 1 October 2014.
  3. "Proposed Electorate Boundaries - Pare Hauraki-Pare Waikato". Elections New Zealand. Archived from the original on 14 May 2010. Retrieved 10 April 2010.
  4. 1 2 "Official Count Results -- Hauraki-Waikato, 2008". Chief Electoral Office. 22 November 2008. Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  5. 1 2 "Official Count Results -- Hauraki-Waikato, 2011". Electoral Commission. 10 December 2011. Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  6. "Nanaia Mahuta and Kelvin Davis consider what lies ahead for Māori Labour MPs". Māori Television . 21 September 2014. Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  7. "Māori Dictionary - "Pare"". Archived from the original on 23 May 2013. Retrieved 13 January 2012.
  8. "Official Count Results -- Hauraki-Waikato". Wellington: New Zealand Electoral Commission. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  9. "Official Count Results -- Hauraki-Waikato, 2014". Electoral Commission. 10 October 2014. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  10. "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Archived from the original on 10 November 2011. Retrieved 28 November 2011.