Haywards Heath

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Haywards Heath
Haywards Heath Town Hall.jpg
Haywards Heath Town Hall
West Sussex UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Haywards Heath
Location within West Sussex
Area9.75 km2 (3.76 sq mi)  [1]
Population22,800  [1] (2001 Census)
33,845 [2] (2011 Census)
  Density 2,338/km2 (6,060/sq mi)
OS grid reference TQ335245
  London 34 miles (55 km) N
Civil parish
  • Haywards Heath
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town HAYWARDS HEATH
Postcode district RH16, RH17
Dialling code 01444
Police Sussex
Fire West Sussex
Ambulance South East Coast
UK Parliament
Website Haywards Heath Town Council
List of places
UK
England
West Sussex
51°00′17″N0°05′52″W / 51.0048°N 0.0979°W / 51.0048; -0.0979 Coordinates: 51°00′17″N0°05′52″W / 51.0048°N 0.0979°W / 51.0048; -0.0979
Princess Royal Hospital & Hurstwood Park Neurological Centre Princess Royal Hospital.jpg
Princess Royal Hospital & Hurstwood Park Neurological Centre

Haywards Heath is a town and civil parish in the Mid Sussex District of West Sussex, within the historic county of Sussex, England.

Contents

It lies 36 miles (58 km) south of London, 14 miles (23 km) north of Brighton, 13 miles (21 km) south of Gatwick Airport and 31 miles (50 km) east-northeast of the county town of Chichester. Nearby towns include Burgess Hill to the southwest, Horsham to the northwest, Crawley north-northwest and East Grinstead north-northeast. Being a commuter town with only a relatively small number of jobs available in the immediate vicinity, mostly in the agricultural or service sector, many of the residents commute daily via road or rail to London, Brighton, Crawley or Gatwick Airport for work. [3]

Etymology

The first element of the place-name Haywards Heath is derived from the Old English hege + worð, meaning hedge enclosure, with the later addition of hǣð. The place-name was first recorded in 1261 as Heyworth, then in 1359 as Hayworthe, in 1544 as Haywards Hoth (i.e. 'heath by the enclosure with a hedge'), and in 1607 as Hayworths Hethe. [4] [5]

There is a local legend that the name comes from a highwayman who went under the name of Jack Hayward. [6] [7]

History

Haywards Heath's Muster Green was the site of the Battle of Muster Green, a minor battle that took place in early December 1642 during the First English Civil War between a Royalist army under Edward Ford, High Sheriff of Sussex, and a smaller (but more disciplined) Parliamentarian army under Herbert Morley. Due to the fact that neither side possessed field guns, hand-to-hand combat ensued and after roughly an hour of fighting and 200 Royalists killed or wounded, the Parliamentarians emerged victorious and routed the Royalist army. [8]

Haywards Heath is located in the east of the ancient parish of Cuckfield. A separate civil parish and urban district of Haywards Heath was created in 1894. From 1934 to 1974 Cuckfield, Haywards Heath and Lindfield were combined to form Cuckfield Urban District, [9] but since 1974 the three settlements have had separate councils again.

Haywards Heath as a settlement is a relatively modern development. Following the arrival of the London & Brighton Railway in 1841, its size has increased considerably. Haywards Heath railway station opened on 12 July 1841 and served as the southern terminus of the line until the completion of Brighton station on 21 September. The position of Haywards Heath, and its place on both this railway and near the main road (A23) between London and Brighton, enables it to function as a commuter town, with many residents working in London, Brighton, Crawley and Gatwick Airport. [3]

South Road in Haywards Heath SouthRoadHaywardsHeath.jpg
South Road in Haywards Heath

Other noted historical events in the town's history include:

In the 1960s and 1970s, two light industrial estates were built. Office development has lately resulted in the town being a regional or national centre for a number of national companies and government agencies.

The population has risen from 200 in the early 1850s to 22,800 (2001 census), making it one of the larger towns in West Sussex. The area of the civil parish is 974.99 hectares (2,409.3 acres).

The parish church, dedicated to St Wilfrid, and the Roman Catholic church of St Paul are among the churches and chapels in Haywards Heath. Other places of worship include the Methodist church in Perrymount Road and two Baptist churches, St Richards (C of E), the Church of the Presentation (C of E) and the Ascension Church (C of E).

The Priory of Our Lady of Good Counsel on Franklynn Road was built in 1886 and is Grade II listed. [10] In 1978 it was converted to a restaurant and offices. [11]

Former Priory Former Priory of Our Lady of Good Counsel, Haywards Heath.jpg
Former Priory

Haywards Heath was in East Sussex, but a change to the county boundary in 1974 brought it under the jurisdiction of West Sussex.

Bolnore Village

Housing in Haywards Heath expanded significantly in the first decade of the 21st century due to the creation of Bolnore Village, located to the southwest of the existing town. Planning permission was first granted in the late 1990s for 780 new homes on a greenfield site. The first house was completed in October 2002. Since then, phases 1, 2, 3, 4a and 5 have been built by the house builders Crest Nicholson in conjunction with several other developers. Housing was followed by the construction of various commercial units currently occupied by the Co-operative Supermarket and the country's first self-governing parent-promoted primary school in September 2010.

The decision to grant planning permission for Bolnore Village was somewhat controversial, since the Ashenground and Catts Woods on that site formed a Site of Nature Conservation Interest (SNCI).

As a condition for planning permission, the developers were required to build a relief road for the town, often referred to as Haywards Heath by-pass, which has rerouted the A272 to the south side of the town. Construction work on the relief road commenced in 2012; on its completion in August 2014, the previous A272 route through Haywards Heath was renumbered the B2272.

In 2008, local residents won a bid to set up and run their own primary school for the village. [12] The new school opened in September 2008.

Future

As Bolnore village's construction has nearly finished the majority of new housing for Haywards Heath has been on the southern side of the A272, the site is commonly referred to as Sandrocks after the house that was previously there. This area has 6 main development areas, of which 2 have been completed as of Summer 2018.

New housing developments have also appeared on the northern side of the town. Both of them allow approx 400 new dwellings to be built. The first one is on the northern end of Penland Road and south of Hanlye Lane and started development in 2017. The other one is between Lindfield and Walstead. This started in 2015 and was due to be completed by the end of 2019.

Haywards Heath with surrounding villages and large housing developments in 2018 HaywardsHeathMap2018.png
Haywards Heath with surrounding villages and large housing developments in 2018

There are also plans that the land around Hurstwood Farm will be built on, with the provision of a new primary school, Country Park and allotments included in the master plan which has received planning permission. [13]

Geography

Haywards Heath railway station Haywards Heath Train Station Feb18.jpg
Haywards Heath railway station

Rail

Haywards Heath railway station is a major station on the Brighton Main Line. Some of the train services divide at Haywards Heath before continuing their journey to the south, or join other services before continuing north.

Haywards Heath has trains terminating at: London Victoria, Bedford, Cambridge, Brighton, Eastbourne & Littlehampton

Road

Haywards Heath is primarily served by the A272 road, which runs around the south side of the town. This is the new Haywards Heath by-pass, which was opened (ahead of schedule) in August 2014. It diverts town centre traffic south of the town, just south of Bolnore Village, Ashenground and the Princess Royal Hospital. The old A272 through the town centre is now the B2272. Following the A272 to the west, it joins the A23 trunk road which runs both to Brighton to the south and London to the north via the M23.

The town is also connected to Burgess Hill to the south via the A273, B2036 & B2112

Local attractions, culture and facilities

The library in Haywards Heath Library, Haywards Heath.jpg
The library in Haywards Heath

Education

State schools

Oathall Community College is a secondary school for the town and surrounding area. Facilities include a school farm. There are also several primary schools, for example St Joseph's.

There is also a new Chichester College campus opening September 2020, which will be called Haywards Heath College. The college will use the old Central Sussex College Haywards Heath campus on Harlands Road which closed in Summer 2017. [14] The new principal will be the current Worthing College principal. [15]

Haywards Heath is also home to a number of local primary schools, one of which is St Joseph's Catholic Primary School, located on Hazelgrove Road near the centre of the town.

Private schools

Twin towns

Haywards Heath is twinned with:

The section of the A272 that runs south beside Bolnore Village has been named Traunstein Way and there is a German postbox outside the Town Hall to commemorate the link.

Sport and leisure

Haywards Heath has two Non-League football clubs, Haywards Heath Town F.C. who play at Hanbury Park and St Francis Rangers F.C. who play at The Colwell Ground.

Haywards Heath also has a rugby union team.

The area has two hockey clubs nearby: St Francis Hockey Club and Mid Sussex Hockey Club. They both play their home games at The Triangle leisure centre in Burgess Hill, and have a shared clubhouse based in Haywards Heath. [16] [17]

Notable people

See also

Related Research Articles

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Mid Sussex District Non-metropolitan district in England

Mid Sussex is a local government district in the English non-metropolitan county of West Sussex, within the historic county of Sussex. It contains the towns of East Grinstead, Haywards Heath and Burgess Hill.

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Cuckfield Human settlement in England

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Horley Human settlement in England

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Bolney Human settlement in England

Bolney is a village and civil parish in the Mid Sussex district of West Sussex, England. It lies 36 miles (58 km) south of London, 11 miles (18 km) north of Brighton, and 27 miles (43 km) east northeast of the county town of Chichester, near the junction of the A23 road with the A272 road. The parish has a land area of 1479.41 hectares (3654 acres). In the 2001 census there were 1209 people living in 455 households of whom 576 were economically active. At the 2011 Census the population had increased to 1,366. Nearby towns include Burgess Hill to the southeast and Haywards Heath to the east.

Lindfield, West Sussex Human settlement in England

Lindfield is a village and civil parish in the Mid Sussex District of West Sussex, England. The parish lies 1 mile (2 km) to the north-east of Haywards Heath, of which the village is a part of the built-up area. It stands on the upper reaches of the River Ouse. The name 'Lindfield' means 'open land with lime trees.'

Ansty, West Sussex Human settlement in England

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Ouse Valley Railway

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St Wilfrids Church, Haywards Heath Church in West Sussex, England

St Wilfrid's Church is an Anglican church in the town of Haywards Heath in the district of Mid Sussex, one of seven local government districts in the English county of West Sussex. It is Haywards Heath's parish church, and is the mother church to two of the town's four other Anglican churches. Designed in the Decorated Gothic style by George Frederick Bodley, it was built between 1863 and 1865 as the town began to grow rapidly, and stands in a prominent position on the highest ground in the area. English Heritage has listed it at Grade II* for its architectural and historical importance.

St Richards Church, Haywards Heath Church in West Sussex , United Kingdom

St Richard's Church is an Anglican church in the town of Haywards Heath in the district of Mid Sussex, one of seven local government districts in the English county of West Sussex. The present reinforced concrete and brick structure replaced a temporary building which was a daughter church to Haywards Heath's parish church, St Wilfrid's; the new church soon became parished in its own right to reflect the rapid population growth in the northern part of the town. English Heritage has listed the 1930s building at Grade II for its architectural and historical importance.

Battle of Muster Green Battle of the First English Civil War

The Battle of Muster Green was a minor battle of major significance that took place during the first week of December 1642 on and around the then much larger Muster Green in Haywards Heath during the first year of the First English Civil War. A Royalist army under Colonel Edward Ford, High Sheriff of Sussex, marching from Chichester to seize Lewes for the King encountered a smaller but more disciplined Parliamentarian army under Colonel Herbert Morley waiting for them on Muster Green.

References

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  2. "Town population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Archived from the original on 21 October 2016. Retrieved 30 September 2016.
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  4. Glover, Judith (1975). The Place-Names of Sussex. London: B.T. Batsford Ltd. ISBN   0713452374.
  5. Mills, A.D. (1998). A Guide to English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN   0192800744.
  6. Haywards Heath Master Plan Supplementary Planning Document (PDF) (Report). June 2007. p. 13. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 May 2012. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  7. Page, Sarah (2 January 2018). "Notorious highwayman rides again". Mid Sussex Times . Archived from the original on 2 January 2018. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
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  11. "BBC – Domesday Reloaded: The Priory of Our Lady". domesday. Archived from the original on 6 January 2016. Retrieved 21 December 2019.
  12. Curtis, Polly (12 June 2008). "Parents win right to set up eco-school in village woodlands". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 3 April 2015. Retrieved 4 May 2010.
  13. "Plans for 375 homes in Haywards Heath and downgrading of Hurstwood Lane approved". www.midsussextimes.co.uk. Archived from the original on 13 May 2019. Retrieved 2 October 2019.
  14. "Opening date set for Haywards Heath sixth form college". www.midsussextimes.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2 July 2019. Retrieved 2 July 2019.
  15. "Chichester College Group announces opening of Haywards Heath College". Worthing College | Home. Archived from the original on 2 July 2019. Retrieved 2 July 2019.
  16. "Location – St Francis Hockey Club". Pitchero.com. 29 April 2013. Archived from the original on 4 November 2013. Retrieved 3 November 2013.
  17. "Mid Sussex Hockey Club". Mshc.co.uk. Archived from the original on 20 May 2013. Retrieved 3 November 2013.
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