Hazel Heald

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Hazel Heald c.1932 Hazel Heald WS3210.jpg
Hazel Heald c.1932

Hazel Heald (1896–1961) was a pulp fiction writer, who lived in Somerville, Massachusetts. She is perhaps best known for collaborating with American horror fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft.

Contents

Biography

Heald was born the daughter of William W. and Oraetta J. Drake in 1896. [1]

Collaborations

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References