Helena Suková

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Helena Suková
Helena Sukova (Wimbledon 2009).jpg
Country (sports)Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia (1983–1992)
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic (1993–1998)
ResidencePrague, Czech Republic
Born (1965-02-23) 23 February 1965 (age 55)
Prague, Czechoslovakia
(now Czech Republic)
Height1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)
Turned pro1983
Retired1998
PlaysRight-handed (one-handed backhand)
Prize money US$ 6,391,245
Int. Tennis HoF 2018 (member page)
Singles
Career record614–307
Career titles10 WTA
Highest rankingNo. 4 (18 March 1985)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open F (1984, 1989)
French Open SF (1986)
Wimbledon QF (1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1993)
US Open F (1986, 1993)
Doubles
Career record752–220
Career titles69 WTA
Highest ranking No. 1 (5 February 1990)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open W (1990, 1992)
French Open W (1990)
Wimbledon W (1987, 1989, 1990, 1996)
US Open W (1985, 1993)
Other doubles tournaments
Tour Finals W (1992)
Mixed doubles
Career titles5
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Australian Open F (1994, 1998)
French Open W (1991)
Wimbledon W (1994, 1996, 1997)
US Open W (1993)
Team competitions
Fed Cup W (1983, 1984, 1985, 1988)
Hopman Cup W (1989)

Helena Suková (Czech pronunciation: [ˈɦɛlɛna ˈsukovaː] ) (born 23 February 1965) is a former professional tennis player from the Czech Republic. During her career, she won 14 Grand Slam doubles titles, 9 of them in women's doubles and 5 of them in mixed doubles. She also was a four-time Grand Slam singles runner-up and won 10 singles titles and 69 doubles titles.

Contents

Personal life

Suková comes from a prominent Czech tennis family. Her mother, Věra Pužejová Suková, was a women's singles finalist at Wimbledon in 1962. Her father, Cyril Suk II, was president of the Czechoslovak Tennis Federation. [1]

Her brother, Cyril Suk III, is a former professional player on the men's tour who teamed with Suková to win three Grand Slam mixed doubles titles, at the French Open in 1991 and at Wimbledon in 1996 and 1997.

Career

Suková turned professional in 1981. Her career-high world rankings were fourth in singles and first in women's doubles.

Suková was a singles runner-up at the Australian Open twice (in 1984 and 1989) and at the US Open twice (in 1986 and 1993). Suková's most memorable Grand Slam singles win was against Martina Navratilova in a semifinal of the 1984 Australian Open, where she ended Navratilova's 74-match winning streak and her chance at winning a calendar year Grand Slam. Chris Evert defeated her in the final.

In 1987, she became the fourth player to defeat Navratilova and Evert in the same tournament at Eastbourne and she also stopped Navratilova's 69 grass-win streak.

Suková was very successful as a doubles player. She had a career Grand Slam in women's doubles, winning four titles at Wimbledon, two at the US Open, one at the Australian Open, and one at the French Open.

She won three mixed doubles titles at Wimbledon, one at the US Open, and one at the French Open. She also was a women's doubles silver medalist at the Olympic Games in 1988 and 1996 (both times partnering Jana Novotná). [2]

Suková helped Czechoslovakia win the Fed Cup four times, in 1983, 1984, 1985, and 1988. She also teamed with Miloslav Mečíř to win the inaugural Hopman Cup for Czechoslovakia in 1989.

Over the course of her career, Suková won 10 singles titles and 69 doubles titles.

Despite retiring from the professional tour in 1998, she was given a wild card into the 2006 Wimbledon mixed doubles tournament with her brother Cyril Suk. They lost their first round match.

Post-retirement activity

In 1999, Suková helped re-establish the International Lawn Tennis Club of the Czech Republic and became its president.

From January 2001 until June 2008, she was a co-opted member of the executive committee of the Council of the International Clubs. From February 2001 until November 2008, she served on the presidium of the Czech Olympians' Club. In June 2007, Suková was appointed by The Czech Olympic Committee to the presidium of the Czech Fair Play Club. She is also a co-founder of the Kids and Junior Tennis Advancement Organization in the Czech Republic.

Helena Sukova is also a member of the ‘Champions for Peace’ club, a group of 90 famous athletes committed to serving peace in the world through sport, [3] created by Peace and Sport, a Monaco-based international organization. [4]

Helena Sukova got her university doctorate degree in psychology, and since February 2011, has served as a vice president of the Association of Sport Psychologists in the Czech Republic, and served on the working group of the Task Force on Sport Psychology of the European Federation of Psychologists' Associations. She works as a psychologist on a regular basis with her clientele, who range from non-sporting circles to former or current professional athletes.

Hall of Fame induction

On January 24, 2018, Helena Sukova was elected into the Tennis Hall of Fame. [1]

Grand Slam performance timeline

Key
W F SFQF#RRRQ#ANH
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (NH) not held. SR=strike rate (events won/competed)

Singles

Tournament198119821983198419851986198719881989199019911992199319941995199619971998W–L
Australian Open 3R 1R 3R F QF NH 4R QF F SF 3R 3R A 3R 2R 3R 1R 1R 38–16
French OpenA 2R 4R 1R 2R SF 4R QF 2R A 2R AA 3R 1R 1R 2R A21–13
WimbledonA 1R 1R 4R QF QF QF QF 4R 4R 1R 3R QF 4R 2R 2R 4R 1R 39–17
US OpenA 1R 3R QF QF F SF 4R QF 4R 3R 4R F A 2R 3R 1R A45–15
Year-end ranking7425177957881417121722292780NR

Doubles

Tournament 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 SRW–L
Australian Open 2R A F F NH SF A SF W 3R W A 3R QF 1R SF 1R 2 / 1339–11
French Open 3R 1R 3R F SF SF F SF W SF AA 1R 1R QF QF SF 1 / 1546–14
Wimbledon 2R 3R 1R SF 2R W A W W QF SF QF 2R QF W SF QF 4 / 1653–12
US Open 3R A 1R W QF QF 3R 3R F 3R SF W A SF SF 3R A2 / 1445–12
Win–Loss6–42–26–419–38–316–37–216–323–111–414–29–13–310–413–313–47–39 / 58183–49
Year-End Championships
Tour Championships AAA F F F SF SF QF SF W SF A QF QF SF A1 / 1214–1
Career statistics
Year-end rankingN/AN/A833642181223961042

Mixed doubles

Tournament198219831984198519861987198819891990199119921993199419951996199719981999–
2005
2006W–L
Australian OpenNHNHNHNHNHAAAA1RAAFSFQF2RFAA14–6
French OpenAAAQFA1RA3RAWAASF2R2RSF3RAA16–8
Wimbledon1RAAQFAAAA1R3R3R1RW2RWW1RA1R25–9
US Open2RAAAAAAAA2RFWAAQF2RAAA14–5

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References

  1. 1 2 "Michael Stich and Helena Sukova elected into Tennis Hall of Fame". Tennis.com. Retrieved 22 February 2018.
  2. Dunn, Carrie (6 September 2017). "Sukova nominated for Hall of Fame induction". WTA Tennis. Retrieved 23 February 2018.
  3. "Peace and Sport | Our champions for peace". www.peace-sport.org. Retrieved 23 February 2018.
  4. "PEACE AND SPORT AND IIHF BRING THE UNIFIED KOREAN WOMEN'S ICE HOCKEY TEAM FOR A HISTORICAL #WHITECARD PHOTO". www.peace-sport.org. Retrieved 23 February 2018.