Henricus Regius

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Henricus Regius portrayed in his Philosophia naturalis, 1661 Regius, Henricus - Philosophia naturalis, 1661 - BEIC 3881650.jpg
Henricus Regius portrayed in his Philosophia naturalis, 1661

Henricus Regius ( /ˈriəs/ ; July 29, 1598 – February 19, 1679) was a Dutch philosopher, physician, and professor of medicine at the University of Utrecht from 1638. [1]

Contents

Biography

Regius was born in Utrecht, and was also known by his birth name, Hendrik de Roy, or by its French rendering, Henri Le Roy. He studied liberal arts at the University of Franeker and medicine at Groningen University, Leiden University, and subsequently at the Universities of Montpellier and Padua.

University of Franeker university

The University of Franeker (1585–1811) was a university in Franeker, Friesland, the Netherlands. It was the second oldest university of the Netherlands, founded shortly after Leiden University.

Leiden University university in the Netherlands

Leiden University, founded in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands. The university was founded in 1575 by William, Prince of Orange, leader of the Dutch Revolt in the Eighty Years' War. The Dutch Royal Family and Leiden University have a close association: Queen Juliana, Queen Beatrix and King Willem-Alexander are former students. The university came into particular prominence during the Dutch Golden Age, when scholars from around Europe were attracted to the Dutch Republic due to its climate of intellectual tolerance and Leiden's international reputation. During this time Leiden was home to such figures as René Descartes, Rembrandt, Christiaan Huygens, Hugo Grotius, Baruch Spinoza and Baron d'Holbach.

University of Montpellier university in Montpellier, France

The University of Montpellier is a French public research university in Montpellier in south-east of France. Established in 1289, the University of Montpellier is one of the oldest universities in the world.

He was a vocal proponent of Cartesianism, and corresponded frequently with René Descartes. [2] He was the author of a textbook of natural philosophy, Fundamenta Physices.

Cartesianism philosophical and scientific system of René Descartes

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René Descartes 17th-century French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist

René Descartes was a French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist. A native of the Kingdom of France, he spent about 20 years (1629–1649) of his life in the Dutch Republic after serving for a while in the Dutch States Army of Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange and the Stadtholder of the United Provinces. He is generally considered one of the most notable intellectual figures of the Dutch Golden Age.

He died in Utrecht.

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References

  1. Hockey, Thomas (2009). The Biographical Encyclopedia of Astronomers. Springer Publishing. ISBN   978-0-387-31022-0 . Retrieved August 22, 2012.
  2. Copleston, Frederick Charles (2003). A history of philosophy, Volume 4. Continuum International. p. 174. ISBN   978-0-8264-6898-7.

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