Henry & June

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Henry & June
Henry&June.jpeg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Philip Kaufman
Written by
Produced byPeter Kaufman
Starring
Cinematography Philippe Rousselot
Edited by
  • Dede Allen
  • Vivien Hillgrove Gilliam
  • William S. Scharf
Music byMark Adler
Production
company
Walrus & Associates
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date
  • October 5, 1990 (1990-10-05)
Running time
136 minutes [1]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Box office$23.5 million [2]

Henry & June is a 1990 American biographical drama film directed by Philip Kaufman, and starring Fred Ward, Uma Thurman, and Maria de Medeiros. It is loosely based on the posthumously published 1986 Anaïs Nin book of the same name, and tells the story of Nin's relationship with Henry Miller and his wife, June.

Contents

The film was nominated for Best Cinematography at the 63rd Academy Awards.

It was the first film to be given an NC-17 rating by the MPAA. [3]

Plot

In 1931 in Paris, France, Anaïs Nin is in a stable relationship with her husband Hugo, but longs for more out of life. When Nin first meets Henry Miller, he is working on his first novel. Nin is drawn to Miller and his wife June, as well as their bohemian lifestyle. Nin becomes involved in the couple's tormented relationship, having an affair with Miller and also pursuing June. Ultimately, Nin helps Miller to publish his novel Tropic of Cancer , but catalyzes the Millers' separation, while she returns to Hugo.

Cast

Soundtrack

The soundtrack was arranged by Mark Adler, consisting of period popular songs.

  1. Jean Lenoir, "Parlez-moi d'amour" (Lucienne Boyer)
  2. Claude Debussy, Six épigraphes antiques : Pour l'égyptienne (Ensemble Musical de Paris)
  3. Francis Poulenc, "Les chemins de l'amour" (Ransom Wilson and Christopher O'Riley)
  4. Debussy, Petite Suite : "Ballet" (Aloys and Alfons Kontarsky)
  5. Harry Warren, "I Found a Million Dollar Baby" (Bing Crosby)
  6. Erik Satie, "Gnossienne No. 3" (Pascal Rogé)
  7. Satie, "Je te veux" (Jean-Pierre Armengaud)
  8. Debussy, "Sonata for Violin and Piano" (first movement) (Kyung-wha Chung and Radu Lupu)
  9. Frédéric Chopin, Nocturne No. 1 in C Major [sic] (Paul Crossley)
  10. Georges Auric, "Sous les toits de Paris" (Rene Nazels)
  11. Jacques Larmanjat, lyrics by Francis Carco, "Le doux caboulot" (Annie Fratellini)
  12. Debussy, "La plus que lente" (Josef Suk)
  13. "Je m'ennuie" (Mark Adler)
  14. "Coralia" (Mark Adler)
  15. Irving Mills, "St. James Infirmary Blues" (Mark Adler)
  16. Francisco Tárrega, "Gran Vals" (Francisco Tárrega)
  17. Joaquin Nin-Culmell, "Basque Song" (Joaquin Nin-Culmell)
  18. Vincent Scotto, lyrics by George Koger and H. Vama, "J'ai deux amours" (Josephine Baker)

Reception

Box office

Henry & June grossed $11,567,449 in the domestic market and $11,905,000 internationally for a worldwide total of $23,472,449. [2]

Critical reception

The film received mixed reviews from critics. Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly gave the film a B−, but felt that, "Kaufman, trying to deepen the erotic explorations of Unbearable Lightness, ends up with a triangle movie that’s watchable but also arty and rather stilted. The biggest disappointment of the film is that, after all the ratings brouhaha, it’s not very sexy." [4] Janet Maslin of The New York Times noted the film's efforts to present sex in a more artistic, highbrow manner, remarking, "The film's sex scenes, photographed delicately by Philippe Rousselot and directed with great intensity by Mr. Kaufman, are particularly lofty. These sequences, often tinged with symbolism (a hand playing a guitar juxtaposed with a hand on a woman's breast), tend to be self-consciously bold," but felt the film lacked daring. [5]

The film has a 63% approval rating on review aggregate Rotten Tomatoes based on 24 reviews, with an average rating of 6.1/10. The site's consensus reads, "Henry & June celebrates sensuality and passion, though the portentous filmmaking drags it down by a large degree". [3]

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Henry and June: From the Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin is a 1986 book that is based upon material excerpted from the unpublished diaries of Anaïs Nin. It corresponds temporally to the first volume of Nin's published diaries, written between October 1931 and October 1932, yet is radically different, in that that book begins with a description of the landscape of and around her home and never mentions her husband, whereas Henry and June begins with discussion of Nin's sex life and is full of her struggles and passionate relationship with husband Hugo, and then, as the novel/memoir progresses, other lovers.

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References

  1. "HENRY & JUNE (18)". British Board of Film Classification . September 28, 1990. Retrieved January 29, 2013.
  2. 1 2 "Henry & June (1990) – Box Office Mojo". Amazon.com . Box Office Mojo . Retrieved January 29, 2013.
  3. 1 2 "Henry & June". Rotten Tomatoes . October 5, 1990.
  4. Gleiberman, Owen (October 12, 1990). "Henry & June". Entertainment Weekly . Retrieved May 13, 2018.
  5. Maslin, Janet (October 5, 1990). "A Writer's Awakening to the Erotic". The New York Times . Retrieved May 13, 2018.