Henry Belasyse, 2nd Earl Fauconberg

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The Earl Fauconberg
Henry Belasyse, 2nd Earl of Fauconberg.jpg
Personal details
Born(1742-04-13)13 April 1742
Died23 March 1802(1802-03-23) (aged 59)
NationalityBritish
Political party Whig
Spouse(s)Charlotte Lamb Jane Cheshyre

Henry Belasyse, 2nd Earl Fauconberg (13 April 1742 – 23 March 1802) was a British politician and peer.

Contents

Family

Fauconberg was the son of Thomas Belasyse, 1st Earl Fauconberg and Catherine Betham. [1]

Thomas Belasyse, 1st Earl Fauconberg was a British peer.

Career

He served as the Member of Parliament for Peterborough between 1768 and 1774, sitting for the Whig party. Following his succession to his father's title in 1774, Fauconberg assumed his seat in the House of Lords. He was a Lord of the Bedchamber from 1777 until his death in 1802, and was Custos Rotulorum and Lord Lieutenant of the North Riding of Yorkshire over the same period. [2]

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The Whigs were a political faction and then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Between the 1680s and 1850s, they contested power with their rivals, the Tories. The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic. The Whigs took full control of the government in 1715 and remained totally dominant until King George III, coming to the throne in 1760, allowed Tories back in. The Whig Supremacy (1715–1760) was enabled by the Hanoverian succession of George I in 1714 and the failed Jacobite rising of 1715 by Tory rebels. The Whigs thoroughly purged the Tories from all major positions in government, the army, the Church of England, the legal profession and local offices. The Party's hold on power was so strong and durable, historians call the period from roughly 1714 to 1783 the age of the Whig Oligarchy. The first great leader of the Whigs was Robert Walpole, who maintained control of the government through the period 1721–1742 and whose protégé Henry Pelham led from 1743 to 1754.

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Marriages and issue

On 29 May 1766, he married the Hon. Charlotte Lamb, the daughter of Sir Matthew Lamb, 1st Baronet and sister of Peniston Lamb, 1st Viscount Melbourne. Together they had four daughters:

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On 5 January 1791 he married Jane Cheshyre, daughter of John Cheshyre, Esq., of Bennington co. Hertford. She died 4 April 1820 and they had no children. [3]

As Fauconberg had no sons, his earldom became extinct upon his death. He was succeeded by his cousin, Rowland Belasyse, in his viscountcy and barony. [4] Through his wife he was the uncle of the Whig Prime Minister William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne.

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References

  1. Arthur Collins, The peerage of England (1779), 364.
  2. Arthur Collins, The peerage of England (1779), 364.
  3. "Fauconberg, Earl (GB, 1756 - 1802)". Cracroft's Peerage: The Complete Guide to the British Peerage & Baronetage. Retrieved 13 May 2018.
  4. Cracroft's Peerage: The Complete Guide to the British Peerage & Baronetage - 'Fauconberg, Earl (GB, 1756 - 1802)' http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/fauconberg1774.htm
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Sir Matthew Lamb, Bt
Matthew Wyldbore
Member of Parliament for Peterborough
1768 1774
With: Matthew Wyldbore
Succeeded by
Richard Benyon
Matthew Wyldbore
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Thomas Belasyse
Earl Fauconberg
2nd creation
1774–1802
Extinct
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Thomas Belasyse
Viscount Fauconberg
1st creation
1774–1802
Succeeded by
Rowland Belasyse