Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret

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Henry Frederick Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (1735-1826), detail from his mural monument in Kilkhampton Church, Cornwall HenryThynne BaronCarteret KilkhamptonChurch Cornwall.PNG
Henry Frederick Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (1735–1826), detail from his mural monument in Kilkhampton Church, Cornwall
Quartered arms of Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (1735-1826): 1st & 4th grand quarters: 1st & 4th Gules, four fusils conjoined in fess argent (Carteret); 2nd & 3rd: Gules, three clarions or (Granville); 2nd & 3rd grand quarters: 1st & 4th: Barry of ten or and sable (Botteville); 2nd & 3rd: Argent, a lion rampant with tail nowed and erect gules (Thynne) Baron Carteret coa.png
Quartered arms of Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (1735–1826): 1st & 4th grand quarters: 1st & 4th Gules, four fusils conjoined in fess argent (Carteret); 2nd & 3rd: Gules, three clarions or (Granville); 2nd & 3rd grand quarters: 1st & 4th: Barry of ten or and sable (Botteville); 2nd & 3rd: Argent, a lion rampant with tail nowed and erect gules (Thynne)
Mural monument in Kilkhampton Church, Cornwall, to Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (1735-1826), inscribed: "Henry Frederick Thynne. Born November 1735. Privy Counsellor, Bailiff of Jersey, Baron Carteret of Hawnes. Died June 1826". An identical monument survives in Haynes Church HenryThynne 1stBaronCarteret KilkhamptonChurch Cornwall.PNG
Mural monument in Kilkhampton Church, Cornwall, to Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret (1735–1826), inscribed: "Henry Frederick Thynne. Born November 1735. Privy Counsellor, Bailiff of Jersey, Baron Carteret of Hawnes. Died June 1826". An identical monument survives in Haynes Church

Henry Frederick Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret PC (1735–1826), of Haynes, Bedfordshire (known until 1776 as the Honourable Henry Frederick Thynne), was Member of Parliament for Staffordshire (1757–1761), for Weobley in Herefordshire (1761–1770) and was Master of the Household to King George III 1768–1771. He was hereditary Bailiff of Jersey 1776–1826.

Haynes, Bedfordshire farm village in the United Kingdom

Haynes is a small village, civil parish and former manor, located in Bedfordshire, England, about seven miles (11 km) south of Bedford. It includes the small hamlet of Haynes Church End. It used to be known as Hawnes. North from Haynes is a hamlet named Silver End, then further up is Herrings Green, Cotton End and Shortstown.The name 'Haynes' is derived from an Old English word meaning "enclosures". It was mentioned in Domesday Book. There is a pub, "The Greyhound", a shop, a post office, a village hall and a Lower School.

Staffordshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Members of Parliament until 1832.

Weobley was a parliamentary borough in Herefordshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons in 1295 and from 1628 until 1832, when the borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Contents

Origins

He was the second son of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth (1710–1751), by his second wife Louisa Carteret, daughter of John Carteret, 2nd Baron Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville (1690–1763). He was thus the younger brother of Thomas Thynne, 3rd Viscount Weymouth, later created Marquess of Bath. [2]

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth English Viscount

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth of Longleat House in Wiltshire was an English peer, descended from Sir John Thynne (c.1515-1580) builder of Longleat.

John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville British statesman

John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville, 7th Seigneur of Sark,, commonly known by his earlier title Lord Carteret, was a British statesman and Lord President of the Council from 1751 to 1763; he worked extremely closely with the Prime Minister of the country, Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington, in order to manage the various factions of the Government. He was Seigneur of Sark from 1715 to 1720 when he sold the fief. He held the office of Bailiff of Jersey from 1715 to 1763.

Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath 18th-century English noble

Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, KG, PC, of Longleat in Wiltshire, was a British politician who held office under King George III. He served as Southern Secretary, Northern Secretary and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Between 1751 and 1789, he was known as the 3rd Viscount Weymouth. He is possibly best known for his role in the Falklands Crisis of 1770.

Education

He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge, graduating BA, and in 1753 proceeded MA. In 1769 he was awarded the degree of Doctor of Civil Laws. [3]

St Johns College, Cambridge college of the University of Cambridge

St John's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge founded by the Tudor matriarch Lady Margaret Beaufort. In constitutional terms, the college is a charitable corporation established by a charter dated 9 April 1511. The aims of the college, as specified by its statutes, are the promotion of education, religion, learning and research. It is one of the larger Oxbridge colleges in terms of student numbers. For 2018, St. John’s was ranked 9th of 29 colleges in the Tompkins Table with over 30% of its students earning First-class honours.

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

Career

In 1757 he was encouraged by his friend and 3rd cousin (both were descended from daughters and eventual co-heiresses of John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath (1628–1701)) Granville Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Gower (1721–1803), to enter Parliament for Staffordshire, when that seat had become vacant following the death of Gower's uncle, Hon. William Leveson-Gower (died 1756). In 1761 he was elected for the Herefordshire borough of Weobley, which he represented until 1770. [4]

John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath English Royalist soldier and politician

John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath PC, of Stowe in the parish of Kilkhampton in Cornwall, was an English Royalist soldier and statesman during the Civil War who played a major role in the 1660 Restoration of the Monarchy and was later appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He was the first in his family to adopt the modernised spelling as Granville of their ancient surname Grenville, which emphasised their supposed ancient 11th-century origin from the Normandy manor of Granville, Manche.

Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Marquess of Stafford British politician

Granville Leveson-Gower, 1st Marquess of Stafford, PC, known as Viscount Trentham from 1746 to 1754 and as The Earl Gower from 1754 to 1786, was a British politician from the Leveson-Gower family.

William Leveson Gower was a British Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons for 36 years from 1720 to 1756.

In 1762 his brother sought an office for him, leading to his appointment as Clerk Comptroller of the Green Cloth (worth £1000 per year). [5] He lost this office when the Grenville government fell in 1765, and entered into opposition. After his brother returned to office as Secretary of State in 1767, [6] Thynne returned to the Royal household as Master of the Household, a post worth over £900 which he held until 1771. [7]

Clerk of the Green Cloth

The Clerk of the Green Cloth was a position in the British Royal Household. The clerk acted as secretary of the Board of Green Cloth, and was therefore responsible for organising royal journeys and assisting in the administration of the Royal Household. From the Restoration, there were four clerks. Two additional clerks comptrollers were added in 1761, but one of these was redesignated a clerk in 1762.

The Master of the Household is the operational head of the "below stairs" elements of the Royal Households of the United Kingdom. The role has charge of the domestic staff, from the Royal Kitchens, the pages and footmen, to the housekeeper and their staff.

He was made a member of the Privy Council in 1770. In 1771 (after his brother had left office), he was given the office of joint Postmaster General, which he held until 1789. This was worth £3000 per year, and he thereupon retired from the House of Commons. [6] He gave up the postmastership in 1789, when his brother was created Marquess of Bath. [6]

Postmaster General of the United Kingdom

The Postmaster General of the United Kingdom was a Cabinet-level ministerial position in HM Government. Aside from maintaining the postal system, the Telegraph Act of 1868 established the Postmaster General's right to exclusively maintain electric telegraphs. This would subsequently extend to telecommunications and broadcasting.

Marquess of Bath title in the Peerage of Great Britain

Marquess of Bath is a title in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was created in 1789 for Thomas Thynne, Viscount Weymouth. The Marquess holds the subsidiary titles Baron Thynne, of Warminster in the County of Wiltshire , and Viscount Weymouth, both created in 1682 in the Peerage of England. He is also a baronet in the Baronetage of England.

Inheritance and peerage

In 1776, by Act of Parliament, [8] he changed his name and arms to Carteret, in compliance with his inheritance from his childless uncle Robert Carteret, 3rd Baron Carteret, 3rd Earl Granville (1721–1776) (under the terms of the will of the latter's father John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville (1690–1763), [9] of his estates including Hawnes Park (now Haynes Park), in Bedfordshire and Kilkhampton in Cornwall (the ancient seat of the Granvilles, Earls of Bath). He also succeeded him as Bailiff of Jersey, a post (for life) long held by heads of the Carteret family. In 1784 he was created Baron Carteret, of Hawnes, thus reviving his uncle's second title.

Rebuilds Hawnes Park

Haynes Park (formerly known as "Hawnes") in 2001. South front as rebuilt in about 1785-1790 by Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret. Hawnes, Haynes Church End (geograph 3340940).jpg
Haynes Park (formerly known as "Hawnes") in 2001. South front as rebuilt in about 1785–1790 by Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret.

Hawnes Park was modernised and partly rebuilt by Henry Carteret, 1st Baron Carteret, and in 1813 consisted of two quadrangles. [11] He rebuilt the south front in about 1785–1790, probably to the designs of James Lewis. [10] In 1813 Lysons reported that it contained portraits of Margaret, Countess of Lennox; the mother of Rembrandt; Sir George and Lady Carteret; John, Earl Granville, and at the foot of the staircase "an ancient view" of Longleat, seat of the Thynne family. [12]

Marriage

In 1810 he married his mistress of many years, Eleanor Smart, but there were no children.

Death and succession

He died in 1826 and was succeeded as 2nd Baron by his younger nephew Lord George Thynne (1770–1838) in accordance with a special remainder in the patent when he was created baron. [6] His simple white marble mural monument with bust survives in Kilkhampton Church, Cornwall, inscribed:

"Henry Frederick Thynne. Born November 1735. Privy Counsellor, Bailiff of Jersey, Baron Carteret of Hawnes. Died June 1826"

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References

  1. Burke's Peerage (1939 edn), s.v. Bath, Marquess.
  2. "Thynne, The Hon. Henry Frederick (THN752HF)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.
  3. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs
  4. 'The household below stairs: Clerks of the Green Cloth 1660-1782', Office-Holders in Modern Britain: Volume 11 (revised): Court Officers, 1660-1837 (2006), pp. 403–40. British History online, accessed 9 August 2008.
  5. 1 2 3 4 Roland Thorne, ‘Carteret , Henry Frederick, first Baron Carteret of Hawnes (1735–1826)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, Jan 2008), accessed 9 Aug 2008
  6. British History online, accessed 9 August 2008.
  7. The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, Volume 96, Part 2, August 1826, p. 174, Obituary
  8. Victoria County History, Bedford, Volume 2, William Page (editor), 1908, pp. 338–344, Parishes: Hawnes or Haynes
  9. 1 2 Listed building text
  10. Lysons, Daniel & Samuel, Magna Britannia, Vol.I, Part I, Bedfordshire, London, 1813, p. 93
  11. Lysons, 1813.
  12. Burke, Sir Bernard, (1938 ed) Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Shaw, London. p. 243
  13. 1 2 3 Woodfall, H. (1768). The Peerage of England; Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of that Kingdom Etc. Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected, and Continued to the Present Time, Volume 6. p. 258.
  14. 1 2 Lee, Sidney; Edwards, A. S. G. (revised) (2004). "Thynne, William (d. 1546)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27426.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  15. Girouard, Mark, Thynne, Sir John (1515–1580), estate manager and builder of Longleat in Oxford Dictionary of Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  16. Booth, Muriel. "Thynne, John (?1550–1604), of Longleat, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  17. Lancaster, Henry; Thrush, Andrew. "Thynne, Charles (c.1568–1652), of Cheddar, Som". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  18. Pugh, R. B.; Crittall, Elizabeth, eds. (1957). "Parliamentary history: 1529–1629". A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 5. British History Online. London: Victoria County History.
  19. Ferris, John P. "Thynne, Sir James (c.1605-70), of Longbridge Deverill, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  20. Helms, M. W.; Ferris, John P. "Thynne, Sir Thomas (c.1610–c.69), of Richmond, Surr". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  21. Marshall, Alan (2008) [2004]. "Thynne, Thomas [nicknamed Tom of Ten Thousand] (1647/8–1682)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27423.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  22. Heath-Caldwell, J. J. "Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, 3rd Viscount Weymouth". JJ Heath-Caldwell. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  23. Hayton, D. W. "Thynne, Hon. Henry (1675-1708)". The History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  24. Dunaway, Stewart (2013). Lord John Carteret, Earl Granville: His Life History and the Granville Grants. Lulu. p. 33. ISBN   9781300878070.
  25. "Bath, Thomas Thynne". Encyclopedia Britannica 1911. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  26. Thorne, Roland. "Carteret [formerly Thynne], Henry Frederick". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  27. "Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath (1765–1837)". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  28. Escott, Margaret. "Thynne, Lord Henry Frederick (1797-1837), of 6 Grovesnor Square, Mdx". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  29. "John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath (1831-1896), Diplomat and landowner". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Hon. William Leveson-Gower
William Bagot
Member of Parliament for Staffordshire
1756–1761
With: William Bagot
Succeeded by
Lord Grey
William Bagot
Preceded by
George Venables-Vernon
John Craster
Member of Parliament for Weobley
1761–1770
With: Marquess of Titchfield 1761–1762
William Lynch 1762–1768
The Lord Irnham 1768–1770
Succeeded by
Bamber Gascoyne
The Lord Irnham
Court offices
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John Harris
Master of the Household
1768–1771
Succeeded by
Sir Francis Drake
Government offices
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The Earl of Sandwich
Unknown
Postmaster General of the United Kingdom
1771–1789
With: The Lord le Despencer 1771–1782
The Viscount Barrington 1782
The Earl of Tankerville 1782–1783, 1784–1786
The Lord Foley 1783–1784
The Earl of Clarendon 1786
The Lord Walsingham 1787–1789
Succeeded by
The Lord Walsingham
The Earl of Westmorland
Legal offices
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The Earl Granville
Bailiff of Jersey
1776–1826
Succeeded by
Thomas Le Breton
Honorary titles
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Lord Charles Spencer
Senior Privy Counsellor
1820–1826
Succeeded by
Lord Robert Spencer
Peerage of Great Britain
New creation Baron Carteret
1784–1826
Succeeded by
George Thynne