Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford

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A 1638 painting of Henry Grey by Cornelis Janssens van Ceulen Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford.jpg
A 1638 painting of Henry Grey by Cornelis Janssens van Ceulen
Arms of Grey: Barry of six argent and azure in chief three torteaux Coat of Arms of Grey.svg
Arms of Grey: Barry of six argent and azure in chief three torteaux

Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford (c. 1599 21 August 1673), known as the Lord Grey of Groby from 1614 to 1628, was an English nobleman and military leader. [1] He was the eldest son of Sir John Grey and Elizabeth Nevill. His mother was probably a daughter of Edward Nevill, 8th Baron Bergavenny (died 1622) and his wife Rachel Lennard.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Edward Nevill, de facto 8th Baron Bergavenny was an English Peer.

Contents

Henry succeeded his paternal grandfather, Henry Grey, 1st Baron Grey of Groby, as second Baron Grey of Groby in July 1614. His paternal grandmother was Anne Windsor, youngest daughter of William Windsor, 2nd Baron Windsor and his first wife Margaret Sambourne.

Henry Grey, 1st Baron Grey of Groby English peer, courtier and MP

Henry Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Groby was an English courtier, administrator and local politician.

His great-grandfather Lord John Grey of Pirgo was son of Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset and younger brother of Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk.

Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset English peer and soldier

Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset was an English peer, courtier, soldier, and landowner.

Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk English Duke

Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk, 3rd Marquess of Dorset, was an English courtier and nobleman of the Tudor period. He was the father of Lady Jane Grey, known as "the Nine Days' Queen".

Life and career

Contemporary engraving of Henry Gray by Wenceslas Hollar Wenceslas Hollar - Henry Gray, Earl of Stamford.jpg
Contemporary engraving of Henry Gray by Wenceslas Hollar

Henry Grey matriculated at Trinity College, Cambridge in 1615, and was granted an M.A. that year, during the visit of King James I of England. [2] He married Lady Anne Cecil, daughter of William Cecil, 2nd Earl of Exeter by his second wife, Elizabeth Drury. Lady Anne Cecil was the heiress of the borough and manor of Stamford. In March 1628, Henry was created Earl of Stamford . Just before the outbreak of the English Civil War, he was included as one of the opponents of King Charles I of England, and was made lord lieutenant of Leicestershire. [1] After some operations around Leicester, he occupied Hereford, and when compelled to abandon the city, marched to Cornwall. [1]

Trinity College, Cambridge constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England

Trinity College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in England. With around 600 undergraduates, 300 graduates, and over 180 fellows, it is the largest college in either of the Oxbridge universities by number of undergraduates. In terms of total student numbers, it is second only to Homerton College, Cambridge.

William Cecil, 2nd Earl of Exeter English politician and Earl

William Cecil, 2nd Earl of Exeter,, known as the third Lord Burghley from 1605 to 1623, was an English nobleman, politician, and peer.

Earl of Stamford title in the Peerage of England

Earl of Stamford was a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1628 for Henry Grey, 2nd Baron Grey of Groby. This Grey family descended through Lord John Grey, of Pirgo, Essex, younger son of Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset, and younger brother of Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk ; Suffolk was executed for treason in 1554 forfeiting his titles.

At the Battle of Stratton, on 16 May 1643, his troops were beaten by the Royalists; driven into Exeter, the Earl of Stamford was forced to surrender the city after a siege of three months. [1] He was certainly no general, and was charged with cowardice. [1] He took no further part in the military operations of the war, [1] although once or twice he was employed on other businesses. The ravages of the Royalists had reduced him to poverty, and distrusted by the House of Commons, he had great difficulty in getting any compensation from Parliament. [1] After a period of retirement, he declared for King Charles II of England during a rising in August 1659, and was arrested but soon released. [1] Henry Grey died on 21 August 1673; his earldom passed to his grandson, Thomas Grey, 2nd Earl of Stamford. [1]

Battle of Stratton battle

The Battle of Stratton was a battle of the south-western campaign of the First English Civil War. Fought on 16 May 1643, the resulting victory for Hopton confirmed Royalist control of Cornwall and destroyed Parliament's field army in Devon.

Cavalier royalist supporter during and following the English Civil War

Cavalier was first used by Roundheads as a term of abuse for the wealthier Royalist supporters of King Charles I and his son Charles II of England during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration. It was later adopted by the Royalists themselves. Although it referred originally to political and social attitudes and behaviour, of which clothing was a very small part, it has subsequently become strongly identified with the fashionable clothing of the court at the time. Prince Rupert, commander of much of Charles I's cavalry, is often considered to be an archetypal Cavalier.

Exeter City in the south west of England

Exeter is a cathedral city in Devon, England, with a population of 129,800. The city is located on the River Exe approximately 36 miles (58 km) northeast of Plymouth and 65 miles (105 km) southwest of Bristol. It is the county town of Devon, and the base of Devon County Council. Also situated in Exeter, are two campuses of the University of Exeter, Streatham Campus and St Luke's Campus.

Children

Henry had at least nine children with Lady Anne Cecil, they were:

George Booth, 1st Baron Delamer English peer

George Booth, 1st Baron Delamer, styledSir George Booth, 2nd Bt, from 1652 to 1661, until his elevation to the House of Lords as an English peer.

Henry Booth, 1st Earl of Warrington English politician and Earl

Henry Booth, 1st Earl of Warrington was a Member of Parliament, Privy Councillor, Protestant protagonist in the Revolution of 1688, Mayor of Chester and author.

Thomas Grey, Lord Grey of Groby Member of the English Long Parliament and regicide

Thomas Grey, Lord Grey of Groby, was an elected Member of Parliament for Leicester during the English Long Parliament, an active member of the Parliamentary party and a regicide. He was the eldest son of Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford, using his father's as his own courtesy title, and Anne Cecil, daughter of William Cecil, 2nd Earl of Exeter.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Wikisource-logo.svg Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Stamford, Henry Grey, 1st Earl of"  . Encyclopædia Britannica . 25 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 769.
  2. "Gray, Henry (GRY615H)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.

Ancestry

Peerage of England
New creation Earl of Stamford
1628–1673
Succeeded by
Thomas Grey
Preceded by
Henry Grey
Baron Grey of Groby
1614–1673