Henry III, Duke of Brabant

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Henry III
Duke of Brabant
Duke of Lothier
Imperial Vicar
Heinricus III of Brabant.jpg
Effigy of Henry on his seal
Born1230
Died28 February 1261
Leuven
Noble family House of Reginar
Spouse(s) Adelaide of Burgundy
Issue
Father Henry II, Duke of Brabant
Mother Marie of Hohenstaufen
Religion Roman Catholicism

Henry III of Brabant (c. 1230 February 28, 1261, Leuven) was Duke of Brabant between 1248 and his death. He was the son of Henry II of Brabant and Marie of Hohenstaufen. [1]

Contents

The disputed territory of Lothier, the former Duchy of Lower Lorraine, was assigned to him by the German King Alfonso X of Castile. Alfonso also appointed him Imperial Vicar to advance his claims on the Holy Roman Empire.

In 1251, he married Adelaide of Burgundy (c. 1233 October 23, 1273), [1] daughter of Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy and Yolande de Dreux, by whom he had four children:

  1. Henry IV, Duke of Brabant (c. 1251 aft. 1272) [1] Mentally handicapped, and made to abdicate in favor of his brother John on 24 May 1267.
  2. John I, Duke of Brabant (12531294) [1] Married first to Marguerite of France, daughter of King Louis IX of France (Saint Louis) and his wife Margaret of Provence, and later to Margaret of Flanders, daughter of Guy, Count of Flanders and his first wife Mathilda of Béthune. [2] [3]
  3. Godfrey of Brabant, Lord of Aarschot (d. July 11, 1302, Kortrijk), [1] killed at the Battle of the Golden Spurs, married 1277 Jeanne Isabeau de Vierzon (d. aft. 1296)
  4. Maria of Brabant (1256, Leuven January 12, 1321, Murel), married at Vincennes on August 27, 1274 to King Philip III of France. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dunbabin 2011, p. xiv.
  2. Iohannis de Thielrode Genealogia Comitum Flandriæ MGH SS IX, p. 335.
  3. Oude Kronik van Brabant, p. 68.

Sources

Regnal titles
Preceded by
Henry II
Duke of Brabant and Lothier
12481261
Succeeded by
Henry IV