Henry IV, Duke of Limburg

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Henry IV (1195 25 February 1247) was the duke of Limburg and count of Berg from 1226 to his death. He was the son of Waleran III, count of Luxembourg and duke of Limburg, [1] and Cunigunda, daughter of Frederick I, Duke of Lorraine.

A duke (male) or duchess (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of royalty or nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank, and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province.

Duchy of Limburg duchy in Western Europe between 1065-1795

The Duchy of Limburg or Limbourg was a state of the Holy Roman Empire. Its main territory including the capital Limbourg is today located within the Belgian province of Liège, with a small part in the neighbouring province of Belgian Limburg, within the east of Voeren.

Count (Male), or Countess (Female), is a historical title of nobility in certain European countries, varying in relative status, generally of middling rank in the hierarchy of nobility. The etymologically related English term, "county" denoted the land owned by a count. Equivalents of the rank of count exist or have existed in the nobility structures of some non-European countries, such as hakushaku during the Japanese Imperial era.

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Originally lord of Montjoie, [1] he married Irmgard of Berg, heiress of the County of Berg, a daughter of the count Adolf VI, [2] who died at the Siege of Damietta in 1218. Irmgard and Henry could not immediately inherit the county, as it was held by Engelbert I, Archbishop of Cologne. Engelbert being the principal adviser of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor, he was confirmed in the county for life, paying a rent to Henry and Ermengard.

Monschau Place in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Monschau is a small resort town in the Eifel region of western Germany, located in the district Aachen, North Rhine-Westphalia.

Irmgard of Berg, heiress of Berg, was the child of Adolf VI count of Berg (1185–1218) and Berta von Sayn.

Engelbert II of Berg Archbishop of Cologne

Count Engelbert II of Berg, also known as Saint Engelbert, Engelbert of Cologne, Engelbert I, Archbishop of Cologne or Engelbert I of Berg, Archbishop of Cologne was archbishop of Cologne and a saint; he was notoriously murdered by a member of his own family.

Engelbert was assassinated on 7 November 1225 and Henry inherited Berg, inheriting Limburg a little while later. He then entrusted Montjoie to his brother Waleran, who already held Faulquemont. He then fought count Frederick of Isenberg, his brother-in-law, who was suspected of the assassination of Engelbert. In 1228, took part in the Sixth Crusade to the Holy Land. Upon returning to Germany, he made war on the archbishop of Cologne, Konrad von Hochstaden between 1238 and 1241. He was counted among the partisans of the Hohenstaufen.

Faulquemont Commune in Grand Est, France

Faulquemont is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Count Frederick of Isenberg was a German noble, the younger son of Count Arnold of Altena. His family castle was the Isenburg near Hattingen, Germany.

Sixth Crusade 13th-century crusade

The Sixth Crusade started in 1228 as an attempt to regain Jerusalem. It began seven years after the failure of the Fifth Crusade and involved very little actual fighting. The diplomatic maneuvering of the Holy Roman Emperor and King of Sicily, Frederick II, resulted in the Kingdom of Jerusalem regaining some control over Jerusalem for much of the ensuing fifteen years as well as over other areas of the Holy Land.

He and Irmgard of Berg had 2 sons :

Adolf VII of Berg was the eldest son of Henry IV, Duke of Limburg and Irmgard of Berg.

Ancestry

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Duchy of Berg former German state and dukedom

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Battle of Worringen middle ages battle

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Henry II was the duke of Limburg from 1139 and count of Arlon from 1147 to his death. He was the son of Waleran, Duke of Lower Lorraine, and Jutta of Guelders, daughter of Gerard I of Guelders. He succeeded his father in Limburg with the title of duke, but Conrad III refused to grant him Lower Lorraine. He continued to style himself as duke nevertheless.

Henry III, Duke of Limburg Duke of Limburg and Count of Arlon

Henry III was the Duke of Limburg and Count of Arlon from 1165 to his death. He was the son and successor of Henry II and Matilda of Saffenberg.

Waleran III, Duke of Limburg Duke of Limburg and Count of Arlon

Waleran III was initially lord of Montjoie, then count of Luxembourg from 1214. He became count of Arlon and duke of Limburg on his father's death in 1221. He was the son of Henry III of Limburg and Sophia of Saarbrücken.

Adolf VI, Count of Berg Ruler of County of Berg

Count Adolf VI of Berg ruled the County of Berg from 1197 until 1218.

WaleranI, called Udon, was the count of Arlon from AD 1052 and Limburg from 1065. He was the son of Waleran, Count of Arlon. He was also the advocate of the abbey of Sint-Truiden.

House of La Marck historical German noble family

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House of Limburg-Stirum noble family

The house of Limburg Stirum, which adopted its name in the 12th century from the sovereign county of Limburg an der Lenne in what is now Germany, is one of the oldest families in Europe. It is the eldest and only surviving branch of the House of Berg, which was among the most powerful dynasties in the region of the lower Rhine during the Middle Ages. Some historians link them to an even older dynasty, the Ezzonen, going back to the 9th century.

Theobald I was the count of Bar from 1190 until his death, and a count of Luxemburg from 1197 until his death. He was the son of Reginald II of Bar and his wife Agnès de Champagne. He became count when his brother, Henry, was killed in the Siege of Acre.

Engelbert II of the Mark was Count of the Mark and through marriage, Count of Arenberg.

Adolf VIII of Berg was the eldest son of Count Adolf VII of Berg and Margaret of Hochstaden.

War of the Limburg Succession conflict

The War of the Limburg Succession, was a series of conflicts between 1283 and 1289 for the succession in the Duchy of Limburg.

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Preceded by
Waleran III
Duke of Limburg
12261247
Succeeded by
Waleran IV
Preceded by
Engelbert II
Count of Berg
12251247
Succeeded by
Adolf VII