Henry Thynne, 3rd Marquess of Bath

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Arms of Thynne: Quarterly: 1st and 4th: Barry of ten or and sable (Boteville); 2nd and 3rd: Argent, a lion rampant with tail nowed and erected gules (Thynne) Thynne-Botteville arms.svg
Arms of Thynne: Quarterly: 1st and 4th: Barry of ten or and sable (Boteville); 2nd and 3rd: Argent, a lion rampant with tail nowed and erected gules (Thynne)

Henry Frederick Thynne, 3rd Marquess of Bath (24 May 1797 – 24 June 1837), styled Lord Henry Thynne until January 1837 and Viscount Weymouth between January and March 1837, was a British naval commander and politician. [1]

Contents

Background

Thynne was the second son of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath, whom he succeeded in March 1837 (his unmarried elder brother Thomas had predeceased their father by two months). He inherited land in County Monaghan, Shropshire, Somerset and Wiltshire.

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath British politician

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath KG, styled Viscount Weymouth from 1789 until 1796, was a British peer.

Military and political careers

He was educated at Eton College. He then served in the Royal Navy and rose to the rank of Captain in 1822 after which he transferred to the Signals Corps and did not return to sea. From 1824 to 1826 and 1828 to 1832, he was MP (Tory) for Weobley, Herefordshire.

Eton College British independent boarding school located in Eton

Eton College is an English 13–18 independent boarding school and sixth form for boys in the parish of Eton, near Windsor in Berkshire. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as Kynge's College of Our Ladye of Eton besyde Windesore , as a sister institution to King's College, Cambridge, making it the 18th-oldest Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference school.

Royal Navy Maritime warfare branch of the United Kingdoms military

The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service.

Weobley was a parliamentary borough in Herefordshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons in 1295 and from 1628 until 1832, when the borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Family

Lord Bath married the Honourable Harriet Baring, daughter of Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton, on 19 April 1830. They had four children:

Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton British politician

Alexander Baring, 1st Baron Ashburton PC was a British politician and financier, and a member of the Baring family. Baring was the second son of Sir Francis Baring, 1st Baronet, and of Harriet, daughter of William Herring. His grandfather, John Baring (1697–1748), emigrated from Germany and established the family in England.

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Edward Seymour, 12th Duke of Somerset British aristocrat and Whig politician

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Death

Lord Bath died suddenly in 1837, having been Marquess for only three months, and was buried on 1 July 1837 at Longbridge Deverill, near his home, Longleat House in Wiltshire. He was succeeded by his eldest son John.

Longbridge Deverill village in United Kingdom

Longbridge Deverill is a village and civil parish about 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south of Warminster in Wiltshire, England. It is on the A350 primary route which connects the M4 motorway and west Wiltshire with Poole, Dorset.

Longleat stately home in Wiltshire, England, UK

Longleat is an English stately home and the seat of the Marquesses of Bath. It is a leading and early example of the Elizabethan prodigy house. It is adjacent to the village of Horningsham and near the towns of Warminster and Westbury in Wiltshire and Frome in Somerset. It is noted for its Elizabethan country house, maze, landscaped parkland and safari park. The house is set in 1,000 acres (400 ha) of parkland landscaped by Capability Brown, with 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of let farmland and 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of woodland, which includes a Center Parcs holiday village. It was the first stately home to open to the public, and the Longleat estate includes the first safari park outside Africa.

Wiltshire County of England

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References

  1. "THYNNE, Lord Henry Frederick (1797-1837), of 6 Grovesnor Square, Mdx". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  2. Burke, Sir Bernard, (1938 ed) Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Shaw, London. p. 243
  3. 1 2 3 Woodfall, H. (1768). The Peerage of England; Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of that Kingdom Etc. Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected, and Continued to the Present Time, Volume 6. p. 258.
  4. 1 2 Lee, Sidney; Edwards, A. S. G. (revised) (2004). "Thynne, William (d. 1546)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27426.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  5. Girouard, Mark, Thynne, Sir John (1515–1580), estate manager and builder of Longleat in Oxford Dictionary of Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)
  6. Booth, Muriel. "Thynne, John (?1550–1604), of Longleat, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  7. Lancaster, Henry; Thrush, Andrew. "Thynne, Charles (c.1568–1652), of Cheddar, Som". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  8. Pugh, R. B.; Crittall, Elizabeth, eds. (1957). "Parliamentary history: 1529–1629". A History of the County of Wiltshire: Volume 5. British History Online. London: Victoria County History.
  9. Ferris, John P. "Thynne, Sir James (c.1605-70), of Longbridge Deverill, Wilts". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  10. Helms, M. W.; Ferris, John P. "Thynne, Sir Thomas (c.1610–c.69), of Richmond, Surr". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  11. Marshall, Alan (2008) [2004]. "Thynne, Thomas [nicknamed Tom of Ten Thousand] (1647/8–1682)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27423.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  12. Heath-Caldwell, J. J. "Thomas Thynne, 1st Marquess of Bath, 3rd Viscount Weymouth". JJ Heath-Caldwell. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  13. Hayton, D. W. "Thynne, Hon. Henry (1675-1708)". The History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  14. Dunaway, Stewart (2013). Lord John Carteret, Earl Granville: His Life History and the Granville Grants. Lulu. p. 33. ISBN   9781300878070.
  15. "Bath, Thomas Thynne". Encyclopedia Britannica 1911. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  16. Thorne, Roland. "Carteret [formerly Thynne], Henry Frederick". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  17. "Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath (1765–1837)". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  18. Escott, Margaret. "Thynne, Lord Henry Frederick (1797-1837), of 6 Grovesnor Square, Mdx". History of Parliament. The History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
  19. "John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath (1831-1896), Diplomat and landowner". National Portrait Gallery. Retrieved 2 January 2016.
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Sir George Cockburn, Bt
Lord Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck
Member of Parliament for Weobley
1824 1826
With: Sir George Cockburn, Bt
Succeeded by
Sir George Cockburn, Bt
Lord William Thynne
Preceded by
Sir George Cockburn, Bt
Lord William Thynne
Member of Parliament for Weobley
1828 1832
With: Lord William Thynne to 1831
Lord Edward Thynne from 1831
borough disenfrachised
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Thomas Thynne
Marquess of Bath
March–June 1837
Succeeded by
John Thynne